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Hottopic
19/12/2018 10h00
Ignacio FERNANDEZ MONCADA from Marsicano's lab will give a presentation entitled "A cannabinoid link between astroglial bioenergetics and brain function?"
2018-12-19 10:00:00 2018-12-19 10:30:00 Europe/Paris Ignacio FERNANDEZ MONCADA 0

Hottopic
19/12/2018 10h30
Sebastien DELCASSO from Beyeler's lab will give a presentation entitled "Anatomical and functional organization of valence circuits in the insular cortex."
2018-12-19 10:30:00 2018-12-19 11:00:00 Europe/Paris Sebastien DELCASSO 0

General informations
14/12/2018
Demo PrestoCHILL/FlashFREEZE Microm
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This system allows a quick freezing and/or coating of the samples without isopentane and nitrogen, this dmo will take place on Friday 14/12 from 9h30 to 11h30 on the first tage in front of the caftria.




PhD/HDR defense
14/12/2018 14h00
Geoffrey TERRAL - Roles of cannabinoid type-1 receptors in the anterior piriform cortex

- Roles of cannabinoid type-1 receptors in the anterior piriform cortex

Being involved in many behavioral functions, olfaction has powerful influence in guiding our actions. Odors communicate with the central nervous system via specialized receptors in the nose olfactory epithelium that generate neuronal signals, which in turn are eventually distributed and processed in many brain regions. In particular, the anterior piriform cortex (aPC) is an important olfactory area involved in perception and integration of odors. Given the extended role of the main cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor in sensory and memory brain functions, we hypothesized that CB1 receptors could modulate odor processing in the aPC. To this aim, using a combination of anatomical, electrophysiological, and pharmacological approaches, we first characterized the distribution of CB1 receptors and their ability to regulate aPC circuits. We found that CB1 receptors are mainly expressed in GABAergic interneurons where their activation regulates inhibitory transmission and plasticity. Then, we evaluated the role and the impact of CB1 receptor modulation on odor-related aPC processing. In vivo calcium imaging revealed that odor-evoked aPC activity is affected by alteration of CB1 receptor signaling. Additionally, we demonstrated that physiological aPC-CB1 receptors functioning is necessary for retrieve appetitive but not aversive olfactory memory, likely through modulation of local inhibitory circuits. Overall, this work contribute to a better understanding of how CB1 receptors modulate olfactory processes in the aPC.

Date de la soutenance: 14/12/2018 - 14h00
Lieu: Neurocentre Magendie Seminar room

Pour plus de détails: http://www.bordeaux-neurocampus.fr/fr/formation-doctorale/archives-des-theses/theses-2018/geoffrey-terral.html


Seminars
13/12/2018 10h00
Olfaction Symposium - organized by Guillaume Ferreira, Lisa Roux & Giovanni Marsicano
   Show the web article Link

Lieu: Neurocentre Magendie Seminar Room

Olfaction has long been considered as a « secondary » sensory modality but recent discoveries highlighted its central role in brain functions. During the first session of this symposium, the neurobiological bases of olfactory learning from the early stages of life (Coureaud, Sullivan) to adulthood (Busquets-Garcia, Nicole) will be illustrated. The second session will primarily focus on the physiology of the first relays of olfactory information processing, namely the olfactory bulb and the piriform cortex (or homologous structures in Drosophila), as well as their strong interactions (Nissant, Plaçais, Martin and Wilson)


Pour plus de détails: http://www.bordeaux-neurocampus.fr/fr/manifestations-scientifiques/seminaires-2018/symposium-olfaction.html


General informations
10/12/2018
Promotion !

Congratulations Claire Leger (Oliet team) who is promoted to the TS grade at the University of Bordeaux.




PhD/HDR defense
07/12/2018 14h00
Vernon Garcia-Rivas from Deroche's lab will defend his PhD thesis entitled "Psychobiological correlates of individual variations in the control of nicotine seeking by nicotine and nicotine-associated cues".

from Deroche's lab will defend his PhD thesis entitled "Psychobiological correlates of individual variations in the control of nicotine seeking by nicotine and nicotine-associated cues".
Date de la soutenance: 07/12/2018 - 14h00
Lieu: Neurocentre Magendie Seminar room


PhD/HDR defense
06/12/2018 14h00
Marie LODS Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the long-term stabilization of spatial memory

Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the long-term stabilization of spatial memory
Date de la soutenance: 06/12/2018 - 14h00
Lieu: Neurocentre Magendie Seminar room


Seminars
05/12/2018 10h00
Vladimir Ivosev, invited by Anna Beyeler
   Show the web article Link

Lieu: Neurocentre Magendie Seminar room

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PhD/HDR defense
30/11/2018 13h30
Laurie ROBIN - Roles of astroglial type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) in memory and synaptic plasticity

- Roles of astroglial type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) in memory and synaptic plasticity

The endocannabinoid system is an important modulator of physiological functions. It is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous lipid ligands (the endocannabinoids) and the enzymatic machinery for endocannabinoid synthesis and degradation. The type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) are expressed in different cell types of the brain and are known to be involved in memory processes. Endocannabinoids are mobilized in an activity-dependent manner in brain areas involved in the modulation of memory such as the hippocampus. In this brain region, CB1 receptors are mainly expressed at neuronal pre-synaptic terminals where their stimulation inhibits the release of neurotransmitters, thereby modulating several forms of synaptic activity.
Besides their expression in neurons, CB1 receptors are also expressed in astrocytes. Along with the pre- and post-synaptic neurons, astrocytes are part of the “tripartite synapse”, where they participate in synaptic plasticity and associated memory processes. Interestingly, modulation of astroglial CB1 receptors has been proposed to facilitate glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus. In this brain area, astrocytes regulate the activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) through the control of the synaptic levels of their co-agonist D-serine, thereby mediating long-term synaptic plasticity. However, the mechanisms inducing D-serine release by astrocytes are still not identified. Interestingly, our laboratory showed that the negative effect of exogenous cannabinoids on spatial working memory is mediated by astroglial CB1 receptors through a NMDAR-dependent mechanism in the hippocampus, but the physiological role of astroglial CB1 remains unknown.
One of the forms of memory involving CB1 receptors is novel object recognition memory (NOR). The exogenous stimulation of hippocampal CB1 receptors inhibits the consolidation of long-term NOR formation. Constitutive global deletion of CB1 receptors in mice leaves NOR intact, suggesting that endogenous CB1 receptor signaling is not necessary for long-term NOR. However, recent studies pointed-out that, likely due to compensatory mechanisms, the global deletion of the CB1 gene might mask cell typespecific roles of CB1 receptors, indicating that more sophisticated tools are required to fully understand the physiological roles of the endocannabinoid system in complex
behavioral functions.
In this work, we investigated the physiological role of the astroglial CB1 receptors on NOR formation and synaptic plasticity. By using a combination of genetic, behavioral, electrophysiological, imaging and biochemical techniques, we showed that endogenous activation of astroglial CB1 receptors is necessary for the consolidation of long-term NOR memory, through a mechanism involving the supply of D-serine to enhance synaptic NMDARs-dependent plasticity in the dorsal hippocampus. This study uncovers an unforeseen mechanism underlying D-serine release, triggering NMDARs activity and long-term memory formation.

Date de la soutenance: 30/11/2018 - 13h30
Lieu: module 2.1 (au dessus du RU)

Pour plus de détails: http://www.bordeaux-neurocampus.fr/fr/formation-doctorale/archives-des-theses/theses-2018/laurie-robin.html