News & Events






General informations
          Show the web article Link     Afficher le PDF

Venue: Bordeaux School of Neuroscience

The normal aging process is associated with reduced performance on cognitive tasks that require one to quickly process or transform information to make a decision, including measures of speed of processing, executive cognitive function, working and relational memories. Structural and functional alterations in the brain correlate with these age-related cognitive changes, such as loss of synapses, and dysfunction of neuronal networks. It is crucial to develop new approaches that consider the whole neuroanatomical, endocrine, immunological, vascular and cellular changes impacting on cognition.

This 3-week course will cover the fundamentals of cognitive aging -including inter-individual differences, cognitive and brain reserve and risk factors- and highlight the newest functional imaging methods to study human brain function. The Faculty will share the state-of-the-art molecular, optical, computational, electrophysiological, behavioural and epidemiological approaches available for studying the aging brain in diverse model systems. The Students will learn the potential and limitations of these methods, through practical experience in a combination of lectures addressing aging in both humans and animal models and hands-on-projects. They will acquire sufficient practical experience to model, design and interpret experiments and brainstorm on novel technologies and hypotheses to explore the aging of the brain using more integrative and creative approaches.

Keynote speakers:
Hélène Amieva - University of Bordeaux
Adam Antebi - MPI for Biology of Ageing
Carol Barnes - University of Arizona
LucBuée-Centrede Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert
Gwenaëlle Catheline - University of Bordeaux
Maria Llorens-Martin - Centro de Biologia
Molecular Severo Ochoa
Aline Marighetto - University of Bordeaux
Lars Nyberg - Umeå University
Laure Rondi-Reig - Sorbonne University
Yaakov Stern - Columbia University
Tony Wyss-Coray - Stanford University

Course director: Luísa Lopes
Co-directors: Cheryl Grady and Nora Abrous

Application deadline: 25 May 2020
Stipends are available

Registration
Fee : 3.500 € (includes tuition fee, accommodation and meals)

The CAJAL programme offers 4 stipends per course (waived registration fee, not including travel expenses). Please apply through the course online application form. In order to identify candidates in real need of a stipend, any grant applicant is encouraged to first request funds from their lab, institution or government.

Kindly note that if you benefited from a Cajal stipend in the past, you are no longer eligible to receive this kind of funding. However other types of funding (such as partial travel grants from sponsors) might be made available after the participants selection process, depending on the course.

For enquiries, please contact: info@cajal-training.org




Seminars
07/04/2021 09h00
Steve DOS SANTOS CARVALHO, 3rd Bordeaux Cell Biology Gathering
2021-04-07 09:00:00 2021-04-07 18:00:00 Europe/Paris Steve DOS SANTOS CARVALHO, 3rd Bordeaux Cell Biology Gathering 0    Show the web article Link

Lieu: Agora du Haut Carré, Talence

Join us and participate in the third BCBG meeting occuring at Talence (Agora Du Haut Carré) on April the 7th of 2020.

Program available here


Pour plus de détails: https://neurocentre-magendie.fr/NCM_Downloads_open/BCBG2020Programme.pdf


Hottopic
30/09/2020 10h00
Marianne AINCY from Herry's lab will give a presentation entitled 'Long-range projecting prefrontal inhibitory neurons control fear expression'
2020-09-30 10:00:00 2020-09-30 10:30:00 Europe/Paris Marianne AINCY 0

Hottopic
30/09/2020 10h30
Céline NICOLAS from Beyeler's lab will give a presentation entitled "Role of insular cortex circuits in a model of alcohol use disorder"
2020-09-30 10:30:00 2020-09-30 11:00:00 Europe/Paris Céline NICOLAS 0


Luigi Bellocchio (Marsicano team) and al. in eLife

Cannabis is the most common illicit drug of abuse in the US and globally. In addition, many states in the US, as well as several countries in the world, have legalized the medical and/or recreational use of cannabis. In this rapidly expanding landscape of cannabis use, huge efforts are made to find innovative interventions reducing potential cannabis-evoked harms. Here, we investigated the possible relation between cannabinoids and autophagy, the process of programmed cell “self-digestion”, and asked whether it could be related to the control of motor coordination behavior, one of the best established neurobiological processes impacted by cannabinoids.

We showed that Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the major psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, impairs autophagy and accumulates P62 protein in neurons of the striatum, a brain area that plays a key role in the control of motor coordination. Second, we demonstrate that boosting autophagy, either by pharmacological manipulation (with the FDA-approved mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor temsirolimus) or by dietary intervention (with the natural, non-toxic disaccharide trehalose), rescues the Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced impairment of striatal autophagy and motor coordination in mice. Furthermore, we provide evidence that cannabinoid CB1 receptors located on neurons of the striatal direct (stratonigral) pathway, by coupling to mammalian target of rapamycin activation and autophagy inhibition, are indispensable for the motor dyscoordinating activity of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mice.

Last but not least, using viral mediated genetic manipulation of striatonigral neurons we confirmed that disrupting mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, as well as boosting P62 accumulation in these cells, completely prevents Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced impairment of striatal autophagy and motor dyscoordination in mice.

Taken together, these findings identify impairment of autophagy as an unprecedented mechanistic link between cannabinoids and motor dyscoordination, and suggest that activators of autophagy might be considered as promising therapeutic tools to treat certain cannabinoid-evoked behavioral alterations.

Article

Inhibition of striatonigral autophagy as a link between cannabinoid intoxication and impairment of motor coordination. Cristina Blázquez, Andrea Ruiz-Calvo, Raquel Bajo-Grañeras, Jérôme M Baufreton, Eva Resel, Marjorie Varilh, Antonio C Pagano Zottola, Yamuna Mariani, Astrid Cannich, José A Rodríguez-Navarro, Giovanni Marsicano, Ismael Galve-Roperh, Luigi Bellocchio, Manuel Guzmán ; eLife 2020;9:e56811 doi: 10.7554/eLife.56811

https://elifesciences.org/articles/56811





Andreas Frick (Neurocentre Magendie) has received a Research Award from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI).

His project:
Atypical sensory experience is a core feature of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and may be strongly determinant of other core symptoms of the disorder. Atypical sensory information processing, and associated behavioral symptoms related to the perception of touch, are very common in ASD and exert a strong negative influence on day-to-day life. Nonetheless, there is a surprising paucity of neurobiological studies addressing this aspect of ASD pathology, or specifically attempting to target this symptom for therapeutic rescue. In collaboration with Prof. S. Heinemann (Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena), they are exploring a novel therapeutic strategy for treating sensory symptoms in ASD.