Neurocentre Magendie

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IF du Neurocentre
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728 publications

* equal contribution
Les IF indiqués ont été collectés par le Web of Sciences en Juillet 2017



23/06/2017 | hepatology
Argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1): A marker of unclassified hepatocellular adenoma and high bleeding risk.
Henriet E, Hammoud AA, Dupuy JW, Dartigues B, Ezzoukry Z, Dugot-Senant N, Leste-Lasserre T, Pallares-Lupon N, Nikolski M, Le Bail B, Blanc JF, Balabaud C, Bioulac-Sage P, Raymond AA, Saltel F

Abstract:
Hepatocellular adenomas (HCA) are rare benign tumors divided into three main subgroups defined by patho-molecular features, HNF1A (H-HCA), mutated beta-catenin (b-HCA) and inflammatory (IHCA). In the case of unclassified HCA (UHCA), which are currently identified by default, a high risk of bleeding remains a clinical issue. The objective of this study was to explore UHCA proteome with the aim to identify specific biomarkers. Following dissection of the tumoral (T) and non-tumoral (NT) tissue on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) from HCA tissue sections using laser capture methodology, we performed mass spectrometry analysis to compare T and NT protein expression levels in HCA, H-HCA, IHCA, b-HCA, UHCA and focal nodular hyperplasia. Using this methodology, we searched for proteins, which are specifically deregulated in UHCA. We demonstrate that proteomic profiles allow discriminating known HCA subtypes through the identification of classical biomarkers in each HCA subgroup. We observed specific upregulation of the arginine synthesis pathway associated with overexpression of argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) and arginosuccinate lyase (ASL) in UHCA. ASS1 immunohistochemistry identified all the UHCA, of which 64.7% presented clinical bleeding manifestations. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the significance of ASS1 was not restricted to UHCA but also encompassed certain hemorrhagic cases in other HCA subtypes, particularly inflammatory HCA. CONCLUSION: ASS1+ HCA combined with a typical hematoxylin and eosin stain aspect defined a new HCA subgroup at a high risk of bleeding. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.





12/06/2017 | Trends Neurosci   IF 11.1
Astroglial versus Neuronal D-Serine: Fact Checking.
Papouin T, Henneberger C, Rusakov DA, Oliet SHR

Abstract:
The activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is conditioned by the binding of a co-agonist to a dedicated receptor binding site. It is now largely accepted that D-serine plays this role at many central synapses in the hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and in prefrontal, visual, and somatosensory cortices. D-Serine has been found to be synthesized, stored, and released by astrocytes (Figure 1). However, several immunolabeling studies and experiments in genetically modified animals have recently led to a suggestion that neurons are primarily responsible for the synthesis and release of D-serine [1]. Here we argue that such conclusions could have resulted from the erroneous interpretation of experimental data and that they are at odds with a substantial amount of published work.





09/06/2017 | elife
Co-agonists differentially tune GluN2B-NMDA receptor trafficking at hippocampal synapses.
Ferreira JS, Papouin T, Ladepeche L, Yao A, Langlais VC, Bouchet D, Dulong J, Mothet JP, Sacchi S, Pollegioni L, Paoletti P, Oliet SHR, Groc L

Abstract:
The subunit composition of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDAR), such as the relative content of GluN2A- and GluN2B-containing receptors, greatly influences the glutamate synaptic transmission. Receptor co-agonists, glycine and D-serine, have intriguingly emerged as potential regulators of the receptor trafficking in addition to their requirement for its activation. Using a combination of single-molecule imaging, biochemistry and electrophysiology, we show that glycine and D-serine relative availability at rat hippocampal glutamatergic synapses regulate the trafficking and synaptic content of NMDAR subtypes. Acute manipulations of co-agonist levels, both ex vivo and in vitro, unveil that D-serine alter the membrane dynamics and content of GluN2B-NMDAR, but not GluN2A-NMDAR, at synapses through a process requiring PDZ binding scaffold partners. In addition, using FRET-based FLIM approach, we demonstrate that D-serine rapidly induces a conformational change of the GluN1 subunit intracellular C-terminus domain. Together our data fuels the view that the extracellular microenvironment regulates synaptic NMDAR signaling.





07/06/2017 | autism res
Behavioral abnormalities in the Fmr1-KO2 mouse model of fragile X syndrome: The relevance of early life phases.
Gaudissard J*, Ginger M*, Premoli M, Memo M, Frick A*, Pietropaolo S*

Abstract:
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a developmental disorder caused by a mutation in the X-linked FMR1 gene, coding for the FMRP protein which is largely involved in synaptic function. FXS patients present several behavioral abnormalities, including hyperactivity, anxiety, sensory hyper-responsiveness, and cognitive deficits. Autistic symptoms, e.g., altered social interaction and communication, are also often observed: FXS is indeed the most common monogenic cause of autism. Mouse models of FXS are therefore of great interest for research on both FXS and autistic pathologies. The Fmr1-KO2 mouse line is the most recent FXS model, widely used for brain studies; surprisingly, little is known about the face validity of this model, i.e., its FXS-like behavioral phenotype. Furthermore, no data are available for the age-related expression of the pathological phenotypes in this mouse line, a critical issue for modelling neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we performed an extensive behavioral characterization of the KO2 model at infancy, adolescent and adult ages. Hyperactivity, altered emotionality, sensory hyper-responsiveness and memory deficits were already present in KO mice at adolescence and remained evident at adulthood. Alterations in social behaviors were instead observed only in young KO animals: during the first 2 weeks of life, KOs emitted longer ultrasonic vocalizations compared to their WT littermates and as adolescents they displayed more aggressive behaviors towards a conspecific. These results strongly support the face validity of the KO2 mouse as a model for FXS, at the same time demonstrating that its ability to recapitulate social autistic-relevant phenotypes depends on early testing ages. Autism Res 2017. (c) 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.





03/06/2017 | Neuroscience   IF 3.3
The embryonic development of hindbrain respiratory networks is unaffected by mutation of the planar polarity protein Scribble.
Chevalier M, Cardoit L, Moreau M, Sans N, Montcouquiol M, Simmers J, Thoby-Brisson M

Abstract:
The central command for breathing arises mainly from two interconnected rhythmogenic hindbrain networks, the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG or epF at embryonic stages) and the preBotzinger complex (preBotC), which are comprised of a limited number of neurons located in confined regions of the ventral medulla. In rodents, both networks become active toward the end of gestation but little is known about the signaling pathways involved in their anatomical and functional establishment during embryogenesis. During embryonic development, epF and preBotC neurons migrate from their territories of origin to their final positions in ventral brainstem areas. Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling, including the molecule Scrib, is known to control the developmental migration of several hindbrain neuronal groups. Accordingly, a homozygous mutation of Scrib leads to severe disruption of hindbrain anatomy and function. Here, we aimed to determine whether Scrib is also involved in the prenatal development of the hindbrain nuclei controlling breathing. We combined immunostaining, calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings of neuronal activity in isolated in vitro preparations. In the Scrib mutant, despite severe neural tube defects, epF and preBotC neurons settled at their expected hindbrain positions. Furthermore, both networks remained capable of generating rhythmically organized, respiratory-related activities and exhibited normal sensitivity to pharmacological agents known to modify respiratory circuit function. Thus Scrib is not required for the proper migration of epF and preBotC neurons during mouse embryogenesis. Our findings thus further illustrate the robustness and specificity of the developmental processes involved in the establishment of hindbrain respiratory circuits.





01/06/2017 | Neuropharmacology   IF 5
Endocannabinoid modulation of homeostatic and non-homeostatic feeding circuits.
Lau BK, Cota D, Cristino L, Borgland SL

Abstract:
The endocannabinoid system has emerged as a key player in the control of eating. Endocannabinoids, including 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA), modulate neuronal activity via cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) in multiple nuclei of the hypothalamus to induce or inhibit food intake depending on nutritional and hormonal status, suggesting that endocannabinoids may act in the hypothalamus to integrate different types of signals informing about the animal's energy needs. In the mesocorticolimbic system, (endo)cannabinoids modulate synaptic transmission to promote dopamine release in response to palatable food. In addition, (endo)cannabinoids act within the nucleus accumbens to increase food's hedonic impact; although this effect depends on activation of CB1Rs at excitatory, but not inhibitory inputs in the nucleus accumbens. While hyperactivation of the endocannabinoid system is typically associated with overeating and obesity, much evidence has emerged in recent years suggesting a more complicated system than first thought - endocannabinoids promote or suppress feeding depending on cell and input type, or modulation by various neuronal or hormonal signals. This review presents our latest knowledge of the endocannabinoid system in non-homeostatic and homeostatic feeding circuits. In particular, we discuss the functional role and cellular mechanism of action by endocannabinoids within the hypothalamus and mesocorticolimbic system, and how these are modulated by neuropeptide signals related to feeding. In light of recent advances and complexity in the field, we review cannabinoid-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity and how peripheral restriction of CB1R antagonists may provide a different mechanism of weight loss without the central adverse effects.





06/2017 | Nat Neurosci   IF 17.8
Amygdala inputs to prefrontal cortex guide behavior amid conflicting cues of reward and punishment.
Burgos-Robles A, Kimchi EY, Izadmehr EM, Porzenheim MJ, Ramos-Guasp WA, Nieh EH, Felix-Ortiz AC, Namburi P, Leppla CA, Presbrey KN, Anandalingam KK, Pagan-Rivera PA, Anahtar M, Beyeler A, Tye KM

Abstract:
Orchestrating appropriate behavioral responses in the face of competing signals that predict either rewards or threats in the environment is crucial for survival. The basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) and prelimbic (PL) medial prefrontal cortex have been implicated in reward-seeking and fear-related responses, but how information flows between these reciprocally connected structures to coordinate behavior is unknown. We recorded neuronal activity from the BLA and PL while rats performed a task wherein competing shock- and sucrose-predictive cues were simultaneously presented. The correlated firing primarily displayed a BLA-->PL directionality during the shock-associated cue. Furthermore, BLA neurons optogenetically identified as projecting to PL more accurately predicted behavioral responses during competition than unidentified BLA neurons. Finally photostimulation of the BLA-->PL projection increased freezing, whereas both chemogenetic and optogenetic inhibition reduced freezing. Therefore, the BLA-->PL circuit is critical in governing the selection of behavioral responses in the face of competing signals.





09/05/2017 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 15
Inducing a long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus is sufficient to produce rapid antidepressant-like effects.
Kanzari A, Bourcier-Lucas C, Freyssin A, Abrous DN, Haddjeri N, Lucas G

Abstract:
Recent hypotheses propose that one prerequisite to obtain a rapid antidepressant (AD) effect would reside in processes of synaptic reinforcement occurring within the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus independently from neurogenesis. However, to date no relationship has been established between an increased DG synaptic plasticity, and rapid AD-like action. To the best of our knowledge, this study shows for the first time that inducing a long-term potentiation (LTP) within the DG by stimulating the perforant pathway (PP) is sufficient to induce such effects. Thus, Sprague-Dawley rats having undergone a successful LTP displayed a significant reduction of immobility when passed acutely 3 days thereafter in the forced swimming test (FST). Further, in a longitudinal paradigm using the pseudo-depressed Wistar-Kyoto rat strain, LTP elicited a decrease of FST immobility after only 2 days, whereas the AD desipramine was not effective before 16 days. In both models, the influence of LTP was transient, as it was no more observed after 8-9 days. No effects were observed on the locomotor activity or on anxiety-related behavior. Theta-burst stimulation of a brain region anatomically adjacent to the PP remained ineffective in the FST. Immunoreactivity of DG cells for phosphorylated histone H3 and doublecortin were not modified three days after LTP, indicating a lack of effect on both cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Finally, depleting brain serotonin contents reduced the success rate of LTP but did not affect its subsequent AD-like effects. These results confirm the 'plastic DG' theory of rapid AD efficacy. Beyond, they point out stimulations of the entorhinal cortex, from which the PP originates, as putative new approaches in AD research.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 9 May 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.94.





05/2017 | Eur J Neurosci   IF 2.9
Species-specific diversity in the anatomical and physiological organisation of the BNST-VTA pathway.
Kaufling J, Girard D, Maitre M, Leste-Lasserre T, Georges F

Abstract:
The anteromedial part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (amBNST) is a limbic structure innervating the ventral tegmental area (VTA) that is remarkably constant across species. The amBNST modulates fear and anxiety, and activation of VTA dopamine (DA) neurons by amBNST afferents seems to be the way by which stress controls motivational states associated with reward or aversion. Because fear learning and anxiety states can be expressed differently between rats and mice, we compared the functional connectivity between amBNST and the VTA-DA neurons in both species using consistent methodological approaches. Using a combination of in vivo electrophysiological, neuroanatomical tracing and laser capture approaches we explored the BNST influences on VTA-DA neuron activity. First, we characterised in rats the molecular phenotype of the amBNST neurons projecting to the VTA. We found that this projection is complex, including both GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Then, VTA injections of a conventional retrograde tracer, the beta-sub-unit of the cholera toxin (CTB), revealed a stronger BNST-VTA projection in mice than in rats. Finally, electrical stimulations of the BNST during VTA-DA neuron recording demonstrated a more potent excitatory influence of the amBNST on VTA-DA neuron activity in rats than in mice. These data illustrate anatomically, but also functionally, a significant difference between rats and mice in the amBNST-VTA pathway. More generally, together with previous findings, our research highlights the importance of species differences for the interpretation and the generalisation of research data.





10/04/2017 | Nat Neurosci   IF 17.8
Abnormal wiring of CCK+ basket cells disrupts spatial information coding.
Del Pino I, Brotons-Mas JR, Marques-Smith A, Marighetto A, Frick A, Marin O, Rico B

Abstract:
The function of cortical GABAergic interneurons is largely determined by their integration into specific neural circuits, but the mechanisms controlling the wiring of these cells remain largely unknown. This is particularly true for a major population of basket cells that express the neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK). Here we found that the tyrosine kinase receptor ErbB4 was required for the normal integration into cortical circuits of basket cells expressing CCK and vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGlut3). The number of inhibitory synapses made by CCK+VGlut3+ basket cells and the inhibitory drive they exerted on pyramidal cells were reduced in conditional mice lacking ErbB4. Developmental disruption of the connectivity of these cells diminished the power of theta oscillations during exploratory behavior, disrupted spatial coding by place cells, and caused selective alterations in spatial learning and memory in adult mice. These results suggest that normal integration of CCK+ basket cells in cortical networks is key to support spatial coding in the hippocampus.