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Les IF indiqués ont été collectés par le Web of Sciences en Juin 2020

18/08/2020 | Cell Rep   IF 8.1
Specific Hippocampal Interneurons Shape Consolidation of Recognition Memory.
Oliveira da Cruz JF, Busquets-Garcia A, Zhao Z, Varilh M, Lavanco G, Bellocchio L, Robin L, Cannich A, Julio-Kalajzic F, Leste-Lasserre T, Maitre M, Drago F, Marsicano G, Soria-Gomez E

Abstract:
A complex array of inhibitory interneurons tightly controls hippocampal activity, but how such diversity specifically affects memory processes is not well understood. We find that a small subclass of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R)-expressing hippocampal interneurons determines episodic-like memory consolidation by linking dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) signaling to GABAergic transmission. Mice lacking CB1Rs in D1-positive cells (D1-CB1-KO) display impairment in long-term, but not short-term, novel object recognition memory (NOR). Re-expression of CB1Rs in hippocampal D1R-positive cells rescues this NOR deficit. Learning induces an enhancement of in vivo hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), which is absent in mutant mice. CB1R-mediated NOR and the associated LTP facilitation involve local control of GABAergic inhibition in a D1-dependent manner. This study reveals that hippocampal CB1R-/D1R-expressing interneurons control NOR memory, identifying a mechanism linking the diversity of hippocampal interneurons to specific behavioral outcomes.





06/2020 | hepatol commun
ASS1 Overexpression: A Hallmark of Sonic Hedgehog Hepatocellular Adenomas; Recommendations for Clinical Practice.
Sala M, Gonzales D, Leste-Lasserre T, Dugot-Senant N, Paradis V, Di Tommaso S, Dupuy JW, Pitard V, Dourthe C, Sciarra A, Sempoux C, Ferrell LD, Clouston AD, Miller G, Yeh MM, Thung S, Gouw ASH, Quaglia A, Han J, Huan J, Fan C, Crawford J, Nakanuma Y, Harada K, le Bail B, Castain C, Frulio N, Trillaud H, Possenti L, Blanc JF, Chiche L, Laurent C, Balabaud C, Bioulac-Sage P, Raymond AA, Saltel F

Abstract:
Until recently, 10% of hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs) remained unclassified (UHCA). Among the UHCAs, the sonic hedgehog HCA (shHCA) was defined by focal deletions that fuse the promoter of Inhibin beta E chain with GLI1. Prostaglandin D2 synthase was proposed as immunomarker. In parallel, our previous work using proteomic analysis showed that most UHCAs constitute a homogeneous subtype associated with overexpression of argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1). To clarify the use of ASS1 in the HCA classification and avoid misinterpretations of the immunohistochemical staining, the aims of this work were to study (1) the link between shHCA and ASS1 overexpression and (2) the clinical relevance of ASS1 overexpression for diagnosis. Molecular, proteomic, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in UHCA cases of the Bordeaux series. The clinico-pathological features, including ASS1 immunohistochemical labeling, were analyzed on a large international series of 67 cases. ASS1 overexpression and the shHCA subgroup were superimposed in 15 cases studied by molecular analysis, establishing ASS1 overexpression as a hallmark of shHCA. Moreover, the ASS1 immunomarker was better than prostaglandin D2 synthase and only found positive in 7 of 22 shHCAs. Of the 67 UHCA cases, 58 (85.3%) overexpressed ASS1, four cases were ASS1 negative, and in five cases ASS1 was noncontributory. Proteomic analysis performed in the case of doubtful interpretation of ASS1 overexpression, especially on biopsies, can be a support to interpret such cases. ASS1 overexpression is a specific hallmark of shHCA known to be at high risk of bleeding. Therefore, ASS1 is an additional tool for HCA classification and clinical diagnosis.





05/2020 | sci adv   IF 13.1
Identification of distinct pathological signatures induced by patient-derived alpha-synuclein structures in nonhuman primates.
Bourdenx M, Nioche A, Dovero S, Arotcarena ML, Camus S, Porras G, Thiolat ML, Rougier NP, Prigent A, Aubert P, Bohic S, Sandt C, Laferriere F, Doudnikoff E, Kruse N, Mollenhauer B, Novello S, Morari M, Leste-Lasserre T, Damas IT, Goillandeau M, Perier C, Estrada C, Garcia-Carrillo N, Recasens A, Vaikath NN, El-Agnaf OMA, Herrero MT, Derkinderen P, Vila M, Obeso JA, Dehay B, Bezard E

Abstract:
Dopaminergic neuronal cell death, associated with intracellular alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn)-rich protein aggregates [termed 'Lewy bodies' (LBs)], is a well-established characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD). Much evidence, accumulated from multiple experimental models, has suggested that alpha-syn plays a role in PD pathogenesis, not only as a trigger of pathology but also as a mediator of disease progression through pathological spreading. Here, we have used a machine learning-based approach to identify unique signatures of neurodegeneration in monkeys induced by distinct alpha-syn pathogenic structures derived from patients with PD. Unexpectedly, our results show that, in nonhuman primates, a small amount of singular alpha-syn aggregates is as toxic as larger amyloid fibrils present in the LBs, thus reinforcing the need for preclinical research in this species. Furthermore, our results provide evidence supporting the true multifactorial nature of PD, as multiple causes can induce a similar outcome regarding dopaminergic neurodegeneration.





20/12/2018 | j neuroinflammation   IF 5.2
Sequential alteration of microglia and astrocytes in the rat thalamus following spinal nerve ligation.
Blaszczyk L, Maitre M, Leste-Lasserre T, Clark S, Cota D, Oliet SHR, Fenelon VS

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Spinal reactive astrocytes and microglia are known to participate to the initiation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. However, whether reactive astrocytes and microglia in thalamic nuclei that process sensory-discriminative aspects of pain play a role in pain behavior remains poorly investigated. Therefore, the present study evaluated whether the presence of reactive glia (hypertrophy, increased number and upregulation of glial markers) in the ventral posterolateral thalamic nucleus (VPL) correlates with pain symptoms, 14 and 28 days after unilateral L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats. METHODS: Mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia (von Frey filament stimulation) as well as ambulatory pain (dynamic weight bearing apparatus) were assessed. Levels of nine glial transcripts were determined by quantitative real-time PCR on laser microdissected thalamic nuclei, and levels of proteins were assessed by Western blot. We also studied by immunohistofluorescence the expression of glial markers that label processes (GFAP for astrocytes and iba-1 for microglia) and cell body (S100beta for astrocytes and iba-1 for microglia) and quantified the immunostained surface and the number of astrocytes and microglia (conventional counts and optical dissector method of stereological counting). RESULTS: Differential, time-dependent responses were observed concerning microglia and astrocytes. Specifically, at day 14, iba-1 immunostained area and number of iba-1 immunopositive cells were decreased in the VPL of SNL as compared to naive rats. By contrast, at day 28, GFAP-immunostained area was increased in the VPL of SNL as compared to naive rats while number of GFAP/S100beta immunopositive cells remained unchanged. Using quantitative real-time PCR of laser microdissected VPL, we found a sequential increase in mRNA expression of cathepsin S (day 14), fractalkine (day 28), and fractalkine receptor (day 14), three well-known markers of microglial reactivity. Using Western blot, we confirmed an increase in protein expression of fractalkine receptor at day 14. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a sequential alteration of microglia and astrocytes in the thalamus of animals with lesioned peripheral nerves. Furthermore, our data report unprecedented concomitant molecular signs of microglial activation and morphological signs of microglial decline in the thalamus of these animals.





11/2018 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 11.6
CaMKIIbeta regulates nucleus-centrosome coupling in locomoting neurons of the developing cerebral cortex.
Nicole O, Bell DM, Leste-Lasserre T, Doat H, Guillemot F, Pacary E



11/2018 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 11.6
A novel role for CAMKIIbeta in the regulation of cortical neuron migration: implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.
Nicole O, Bell DM, Leste-Lasserre T, Doat H, Guillemot F, Pacary E

Abstract:
Perturbation of CaMKIIbeta expression has been associated with multiple neuropsychiatric diseases, highlighting CaMKIIbeta as a gene of interest. Yet, in contrast to CaMKIIalpha, the specific functions of CaMKIIbeta in the brain remain poorly explored. Here, we reveal a novel function for this CaMKII isoform in vivo during neuronal development. By using in utero electroporation, we show that CaMKIIbeta is an important regulator of radial migration of projection neurons during cerebral cortex development. Knockdown of CaMKIIbeta causes accelerated migration of nascent pyramidal neurons, whereas overexpression of CaMKIIbeta inhibits migration, demonstrating that precise regulation of CaMKIIbeta expression is required for correct neuronal migration. More precisely, CaMKIIbeta controls the multipolar-bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate through its actin-binding and -bundling activities. In addition, our data indicate that a fine-tuned balance between CaMKIIbeta and cofilin activities is necessary to ensure proper migration of cortical neurons. Thus, our findings define a novel isoform-specific function for CaMKIIbeta, demonstrating that CaMKIIbeta has a major biological function in the developing brain.





13/03/2018 | Brain Behav Immun   IF 6.3
mTORC1 pathway disruption abrogates the effects of the ciliary neurotrophic factor on energy balance and hypothalamic neuroinflammation.
Andre C, Catania C, Remus-Borel J, Ladeveze E, Leste-Lasserre T, Mazier W, Binder E, Gonzales D, Clark S, Guzman-Quevedo O, Abrous DN, Laye S, Cota D

Abstract:
Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) potently decreases food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese mice by acting through neuronal circuits and pathways located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus. CNTF also exerts pro-inflammatory actions within the brain. Here we tested whether CNTF modifies energy balance by inducing inflammatory responses in the ARC and whether these effects depend upon the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which regulates both energy metabolism and inflammation. To this purpose, chow- and high fat diet (HFD)- fed mice lacking the S6 kinase 1 (S6K1(-/-)), a downstream target of mTORC1, and their wild-type (WT) littermates received 12 days continuous intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of the CNTF analogue axokine (CNTFAx15). Behavioral, metabolic and molecular effects were evaluated. Central chronic administration of CNTFAx15 decreased body weight and feed efficiency in WT mice only, when fed HFD, but not chow. These metabolic effects correlated with increased number of iba-1 positive microglia specifically in the ARC and were accompanied by significant increases of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic iNOS and SOCS3 mRNA, molecular markers of pro-inflammatory response, were also increased by CNTFAx15. All these changes were absent in S6K1(-/-) mice. This study reveals that CNTFAx15 requires a functional S6K1 to modulate energy balance and hypothalamic inflammation in a diet-dependent fashion. Further investigations should determine whether S6K1 is a suitable target for the treatment of pathologies characterized by a high neuroinflammatory state.





24/11/2017 | cell cycle   IF 3.5
Regulation of RNA polymerase III transcription during transformation of human IMR90 fibroblasts with defined genetic elements.
Durrieu-Gaillard S, Dumay-Odelot H, Boldina G, Tourasse NJ, Allard D, Andre F, Macari F, Choquet A, Lagarde P, Drutel G, Leste-Lasserre T, Petitet M, Lesluyes T, Lartigue-Faustin L, Dupuy JW, Chibon F, Roeder RG, Joubert D, Vagner S, Teichmann M

Abstract:
RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that are essential for cellular homeostasis and growth. Its activity is regulated by inactivation of tumor suppressor proteins and overexpression of the oncogene c-MYC, but the concerted action of these tumor-promoting factors on Pol III transcription has not yet been assessed. In order to comprehensively analyse the regulation of Pol III transcription during tumorigenesis we employ a model system that relies on the expression of five genetic elements to achieve cellular transformation. Expression of these elements in six distinct transformation intermediate cell lines leads to the inactivation of TP53, RB1, and protein phosphatase 2A, as well as the activation of RAS and the protection of telomeres by TERT, thereby conducting to full tumoral transformation of IMR90 fibroblasts. Transformation is accompanied by moderately enhanced levels of a subset of Pol III-transcribed RNAs (7SK; MRP; H1). In addition, mRNA and/or protein levels of several Pol III subunits and transcription factors are upregulated, including increased protein levels of TFIIIB and TFIIIC subunits, of SNAPC1 and of Pol III subunits. Strikingly, the expression of POLR3G and of SNAPC1 is strongly enhanced during transformation in this cellular transformation model. Collectively, our data indicate that increased expression of several components of the Pol III transcription system accompanied by a 2-fold increase in steady state levels of a subset of Pol III RNAs is sufficient for sustaining tumor formation.





20/11/2017 | hepatology   IF 13.2
New insights into diagnosis and therapeutic options for proliferative hepatoblastoma.
Hooks KB, Audoux J, Fazli H, Lesjean S, Ernault T, Senant ND, Leste-Lasserre T, Hagedorn M, Rousseau B, Danet C, Branchereau S, Brugieres L, Taque S, Guettier C, Fabre M, Rullier A, Buendia MA, Commes T, Grosset CF, Raymond AA

Abstract:
Surgery and cisplatin-based treatment of hepatoblastoma (HB) currently guarantee the survival of 70-80% of patients. However, some important challenges remain in diagnosing high risk tumors and identifying relevant targetable pathways offering new therapeutic avenues. Previously, two molecular subclasses of hepatoblastoma tumors have been described, namely C1 and C2; C2 being the subgroup with the poorest prognosis, a more advanced tumor stage and the worst overall survival rate. An associated 16-gene signature to discriminate the two tumoral subgroups was proposed but it has not been transferred into clinical routine. To address these issues we performed RNA sequencing of 25 tumors and matched normal liver samples from patients. The transcript profiling separated HB into three distinct subgroups named C1, C2A and C2B, identifiable by a concise four-gene signature: HSD17B6, ITGA6, TOP2A and VIM, with TOP2A being characteristic for the proliferative C2A tumors. Differential expression of these genes was confirmed by RT-qPCR on an expanded cohort and by immunohistochemistry. We also revealed significant overexpression of genes involved in Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway in the C2A subgroup. We then investigated the ability of several described FA inhibitors to block growth of HB cells in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that bortezomib, an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, strongly impairs the proliferation and survival of HB cell lines in vitro, blocks FA pathway associated double-strand DNA repair and significantly impedes HB growth in vivo. In conclusion, the highly proliferating C2A subtype is characterized by TOP2A gene up-regulation and FA pathway activation and HB therapeutic arsenal could include Bortezomib for the treatment of patients with the most aggressive tumors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.





08/09/2017 | Sci Rep   IF 4.3
Spinal miRNA-124 regulates synaptopodin and nociception in an animal model of bone cancer pain.
Elramah S, Lopez-Gonzalez MJ, Bastide M, Dixmerias F, Roca-Lapirot O, Wielanek-Bachelet AC, Vital A, Leste-Lasserre T, Brochard A, Landry M, Favereaux A

Abstract:
Strong breakthrough pain is one of the most disabling symptoms of cancer since it affects up to 90% of cancer patients and is often refractory to treatments. Alteration in gene expression is a known mechanism of cancer pain in which microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs, play a crucial role. Here, in a mouse model of cancer pain, we show that miR-124 is down-regulated in the spinal cord, the first relay of the pain signal to the brain. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that miR-124 is an endogenous and specific inhibitor of synaptopodin (Synpo), a key protein for synaptic transmission. In addition, we demonstrate that Synpo is a key component of the nociceptive pathways. Interestingly, miR-124 was down-regulated in the spinal cord in cancer pain conditions, leading to an up-regulation of Synpo. Furthermore, intrathecal injections of miR-124 mimics in cancerous mice normalized Synpo expression and completely alleviated cancer pain in the early phase of the cancer. Finally, miR-124 was also down-regulated in the cerebrospinal fluid of cancer patients who developed pain, suggesting that miR-124 could be an efficient analgesic drug to treat cancer pain patients.