IF du Neurocentre
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54 publications

* equal contribution
The indicated IF have been collected by the Web of Sciences in June 2020



28/01/2021 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 12.4
PAI-1 protein is a key molecular effector in the transition from normal to PTSD-like fear memory.
Bouarab C*, Lacarriere V*, Vallee M, Leroux A, Guette C, Mennesson M, Marighetto A, Desmedt A*, Piazza PV*, Revest JM*

Abstract:
Moderate stress increases memory and facilitates adaptation. In contrast, intense stress can induce pathological memories as observed in post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). A shift in the balance between the expression of tPA and PAI-1 proteins is responsible for this transition. In conditions of moderate stress, glucocorticoid hormones increase the expression of the tPA protein in the hippocampal brain region which by triggering the Erk1/2(MAPK) signaling cascade strengthens memory. When stress is particularly intense, very high levels of glucocorticoid hormones then increase the production of PAI-1 protein, which by blocking the activity of tPA induces PTSD-like memories. PAI-1 levels after trauma could be a predictive biomarker of the subsequent appearance of PTSD and pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 activity a new therapeutic approach to this debilitating condition.





03/10/2020 | Aging Cell   IF 7.2
Age-related impairment of declarative memory: linking memorization of temporal associations to GluN2B redistribution in dorsal CA1.
Al Abed AS, Sellami A, Potier M, Ducourneau EG, Gerbeaud-Lassau P, Brayda-Bruno L, Lamothe V, Sans N, Desmedt A, Vanhoutte P, Bennetau-Pelissero C, Trifilieff P, Marighetto A

Abstract:
GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors have been proposed as a target for treating age-related memory decline. They are indeed considered as crucial for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent memory formation, which are both altered in aging. Because a synaptic enrichment in GluN2B is associated with hippocampal LTP in vitro, a similar mechanism is expected to occur during memory formation. We show instead that a reduction of GluN2B synaptic localization induced by a single-session learning in dorsal CA1 apical dendrites is predictive of efficient memorization of a temporal association. Furthermore, synaptic accumulation of GluN2B, rather than insufficient synaptic localization of these subunits, is causally involved in the age-related impairment of memory. These challenging data identify extra-synaptic redistribution of GluN2B-containing NMDAR induced by learning as a molecular signature of memory formation and indicate that modulating GluN2B synaptic localization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy in cognitive aging.





24/08/2020 | Nat Commun   IF 12.1
Preventing and treating PTSD-like memory by trauma contextualization.
Al Abed AS, Ducourneau EG, Bouarab C, Sellami A, Marighetto A, Desmedt A

Abstract:
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by emotional hypermnesia on which preclinical studies focus so far. While this hypermnesia relates to salient traumatic cues, partial amnesia for the traumatic context can also be observed. Here, we show in mice that contextual amnesia is causally involved in PTSD-like memory formation, and that treating the amnesia by re-exposure to all trauma-related cues cures PTSD-like hypermnesia. These findings open a therapeutic perspective based on trauma contextualization and the underlying hippocampal mechanisms.





09/06/2020 | Cell Rep   IF 8.1
Vangl2 in the Dentate Network Modulates Pattern Separation and Pattern Completion.
Robert BJA, Moreau MM, Dos Santos Carvalho S, Barthet G, Racca C, Bhouri M, Quiedeville A, Garret M, Atchama B, Al Abed AS, Guette C, Henderson DJ, Desmedt A, Mulle C, Marighetto A, Montcouquiol M, Sans N

Abstract:
The organization of spatial information, including pattern completion and pattern separation processes, relies on the hippocampal circuits, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these two processes are elusive. Here, we find that loss of Vangl2, a core PCP gene, results in opposite effects on pattern completion and pattern separation processes. Mechanistically, we show that Vangl2 loss maintains young postmitotic granule cells in an immature state, providing increased cellular input for pattern separation. The genetic ablation of Vangl2 disrupts granule cell morpho-functional maturation and further prevents CaMKII and GluA1 phosphorylation, disrupting the stabilization of AMPA receptors. As a functional consequence, LTP at lateral perforant path-GC synapses is impaired, leading to defects in pattern completion behavior. In conclusion, we show that Vangl2 exerts a bimodal regulation on young and mature GCs, and its disruption leads to an imbalance in hippocampus-dependent pattern completion and separation processes.





2020 | Front Behav Neurosci   IF 2.5
False Opposing Fear Memories Are Produced as a Function of the Hippocampal Sector Where Glucocorticoid Receptors Are Activated.
Kaouane N, Ducourneau EG, Marighetto A, Segal M, Desmedt A

Abstract:
Injection of corticosterone (CORT) in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) can mimic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related memory in mice: both maladaptive hypermnesia for a salient but irrelevant simple cue and amnesia for the traumatic context. However, accumulated evidence indicates a functional dissociation within the hippocampus such that contextual learning is primarily associated with the DH whereas emotional processes are more linked to the ventral hippocampus (VH). This suggests that CORT might have different effects on fear memories as a function of the hippocampal sector preferentially targeted and the type of fear learning (contextual vs. cued) considered. We tested this hypothesis in mice using CORT infusion into the DH or VH after fear conditioning, during which a tone was either paired (predicting-tone) or unpaired (predicting-context) with the shock. We first replicate our previous results showing that intra-DH CORT infusion impairs contextual fear conditioning while inducing fear responses to the not predictive tone. Second, we show that, in contrast, intra-VH CORT infusion has opposite effects on fear memories: in the predicting-tone situation, it blocks tone fear conditioning while enhancing the fear responses to the context. In both situations, a false fear memory is formed based on an erroneous selection of the predictor of the threat. Third, these opposite effects of CORT on fear memory are both mediated by glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation, and reproduced by post-conditioning stress or systemic CORT injection. These findings demonstrate that false opposing fear memories can be produced depending on the hippocampal sector in which the GRs are activated.





20/06/2018 | bio protoc
Protocols to Study Declarative Memory Formation in Mice and Humans: Optogenetics and Translational Behavioral Approaches
Sellami A, Al abed S, Brayda-Bruno L, Etchamendy N, Valerio S, Oule M, Pantaleon L, Lamothe V, Potier M, Bernard K, Jabourian M, Herry C, Mons N, Marighetto A



22/11/2017 | Psychopharmacology (Berl)   IF 3.3
Synergistic enhancing-memory effect of donepezil and S 47445, an AMPA positive allosteric modulator, in middle-aged and aged mice.
Bretin S, Krazem A, Henkous N, Froger-Colleaux C, Mocaer E, Louis C, Perdaems N, Marighetto A, Beracochea D

Abstract:
Positive allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors (AMPA-PAMs) are described to facilitate cognitive processes in different memory-based models. Among them, S 47445 is a novel potent and selective AMPA-PAM. In order to assess its efficacy after repeated administration, S 47445 effect was evaluated in two aging-induced memory dysfunction tasks in old mice, one short-term working memory model evaluated in a radial maze task and one assessing contextual memory performance. S 47445 was shown to improve cognition in both models sensitive to aging. In fact, administration of S 47445 at 0.3 mg/kg (s.c.) reversed the age-induced deficits of the working memory model whatever the retention interval. Moreover, in the contextual task, S 47445 also reversed the age-induced deficit at all tested doses (from 0.03 to 0.3 mg/kg, p.o.). Since donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, induces only moderate symptomatic effects on memory in Alzheimer's disease patients, an alternative strategy for treatment of cognitive symptoms could be to act simultaneously on both glutamatergic AMPA receptors and cholinergic pathways by combining pharmacological treatments. The present study further examined such effects by assessing combinations of S 47445 and donepezil given orally during 9 days in aged C57/Bl6J mice using contextual memory task (CSD) and the working memory model of serial alternation task (AT). Interestingly, a significant synergistic memory-enhancing effect was observed with the combination of donepezil at 0.1 mg/kg with S 47445 at 0.1 mg/kg p.o. in the CSD or with S 47445 at 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg in AT in comparison to compounds given alone and without any pharmacokinetic interaction.





19/09/2017 | Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A   IF 9.7
Temporal binding function of dorsal CA1 is critical for declarative memory formation.
Sellami A, Al Abed AS, Brayda-Bruno L, Etchamendy N, Valerio S, Oule M, Pantaleon L, Lamothe V, Potier M, Bernard K, Jabourian M, Herry C, Mons N, Piazza PV, Eichenbaum H, Marighetto A

Abstract:
Temporal binding, the process that enables association between discontiguous stimuli in memory, and relational organization, a process that enables the flexibility of declarative memories, are both hippocampus-dependent and decline in aging. However, how these two processes are related in supporting declarative memory formation and how they are compromised in age-related memory loss remain hypothetical. We here identify a causal link between these two features of declarative memory: Temporal binding is a necessary condition for the relational organization of discontiguous events. We demonstrate that the formation of a relational memory is limited by the capability of temporal binding, which depends on dorsal (d)CA1 activity over time intervals and diminishes in aging. Conversely, relational representation is successful even in aged individuals when the demand on temporal binding is minimized, showing that relational/declarative memory per se is not impaired in aging. Thus, bridging temporal intervals by dCA1 activity is a critical foundation of relational representation, and a deterioration of this mechanism is responsible for the age-associated memory impairment.





09/2017 | anal bioanal chem   IF 3.4
Derivatization-free LC-MS/MS method for estrogen quantification in mouse brain highlights a local metabolic regulation after oral versus subcutaneous administration.
Lozan E, Shinkaruk S, Al Abed SA, Lamothe V, Potier M, Marighetto A, Schmitter JM, Bennetau-Pelissero C, Bure C

Abstract:
17beta-Estradiol (17beta-E2) is a steroid with pleiotropic actions. In addition to being a sexual hormone, it is also produced in the brain where it modulates the reproductive axis. It has been shown that 17beta-E2 also acts on synaptic plasticity and plays a role in neurological pathways and in neurodegenerative diseases. Assaying this steroid in the brain is thus interesting to improve our knowledge of 17beta-E2 effects in the brain. However, 17beta-E2 concentration in the central nervous system has been reported to be of a few nanograms per gram wet weight (nanomolar range concentration); therefore, its quantification requires both an efficient extraction process and a sensitive detection method. Herein is presented a derivatization-free procedure based on solid-phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis, targeted on 17beta-E2, its isomer17alpha-E2, and its metabolites estrone (E1) and estriol (E3). This extraction process allowed reaching 96% 17beta-E2 recovery from the mouse brain. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values of 0.5 and 2.5 pmol mL(-1), respectively, were reached for both 17alpha-E2 and 17beta-E2. LOD values for E1 and E3 were 0.01 and 0.025 pmol mL(-1), respectively. The variation coefficients for intra- and inter-assays were 6 and 14%, respectively, for both estradiol forms. The method was applied to assess estrogen levels in the mouse brain and hippocampus after 17beta-E2 acute (subcutaneous injection) and chronic (drinking water) physiological administration. Total estrogen levels were determined after enzymatic deconjugation and compared to free estrogen levels. While 17alpha-E2 was not detected in biological samples, 17beta-E2 and metabolite measurements highlight a local biotransformation of estrogens after physiological administration via drinking water. Graphical abstract Method workflow: After oral or subcutaneous Estradiol administration, mouse brain or hippocampus was removed. Samples were homogenized and prepared according to a liquid-liquid extraction, followed by a solid-phase extraction. Then, LC-MS/MS was optimized to quantify 17ss-E2, its isomer17alpha-E2, its metabolites estrone (E1) and estriol (E3) and their conjugates.





10/04/2017 | Nat Neurosci   IF 17.8
Abnormal wiring of CCK+ basket cells disrupts spatial information coding.
Del Pino I, Brotons-Mas JR, Marques-Smith A, Marighetto A, Frick A, Marin O, Rico B

Abstract:
The function of cortical GABAergic interneurons is largely determined by their integration into specific neural circuits, but the mechanisms controlling the wiring of these cells remain largely unknown. This is particularly true for a major population of basket cells that express the neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK). Here we found that the tyrosine kinase receptor ErbB4 was required for the normal integration into cortical circuits of basket cells expressing CCK and vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGlut3). The number of inhibitory synapses made by CCK+VGlut3+ basket cells and the inhibitory drive they exerted on pyramidal cells were reduced in conditional mice lacking ErbB4. Developmental disruption of the connectivity of these cells diminished the power of theta oscillations during exploratory behavior, disrupted spatial coding by place cells, and caused selective alterations in spatial learning and memory in adult mice. These results suggest that normal integration of CCK+ basket cells in cortical networks is key to support spatial coding in the hippocampus.





2017 | PLoS ONE   IF 2.8
Long-term effects of interference on short-term memory performance in the rat.
Missaire M, Fraize N, Joseph MA, Hamieh AM, Parmentier R, Marighetto A, Salin PA, Malleret G

Abstract:
A distinction has always been made between long-term and short-term memory (also now called working memory, WM). The obvious difference between these two kinds of memory concerns the duration of information storage: information is supposedly transiently stored in WM while it is considered durably consolidated into long-term memory. It is well acknowledged that the content of WM is erased and reset after a short time, to prevent irrelevant information from proactively interfering with newly stored information. In the present study, we used typical WM radial maze tasks to question the brief lifespan of spatial WM content in rodents. Groups of rats were submitted to one of two different WM tasks in a radial maze: a WM task involving the repetitive presentation of a same pair of arms expected to induce a high level of proactive interference (PI) (HIWM task), or a task using a different pair in each trial expected to induce a low level of PI (LIWM task). Performance was effectively lower in the HIWM group than in LIWM in the final trial of each training session, indicative of a 'within-session/short-term' PI effect. However, we also observed a different 'between-session/long-term' PI effect between the two groups: while performance of LIWM trained rats remained stable over days, the performance of HIWM rats dropped after 10 days of training, and this impairment was visible from the very first trial of the day, hence not attributable to within-session PI. We also showed that a 24 hour-gap across training sessions known to allow consolidation processes to unfold, was a necessary and sufficient condition for the long-term PI effect to occur. These findings suggest that in the HIWM task, WM content was not entirely reset between training sessions and that, in specific conditions, WM content can outlast its purpose by being stored more permanently, generating a long-term deleterious effect of PI. The alternative explanation is that WM content could be transferred and stored more permanently in an intermediary form or memory between WM and long-term memory.





21/03/2016 | Psychoneuroendocrinology   IF 4.7
Estradiol enhances retention but not organization of hippocampus-dependent memory in intact male mice.
Al Abed AS, Sellami A, Brayda-Bruno L, Lamothe V, Nogues X, Potier M, Bennetau-Pelissero C, Marighetto A

Abstract:
Because estrogens have mostly been studied in gonadectomized females, effects of chronic exposure to environmental estrogens in the general population are underestimated. Estrogens can enhance hippocampus-dependent memory through the modulation of information storage. However, declarative memory, the hippocampus-dependent memory of facts and events, demands more than abilities to retain information. Specifically, memory of repetitive events of everyday life such as 'where I parked' requires abilities to organize/update memories to prevent proactive interference from similar memories of previous 'parking events'. Whether such organizational processes are estrogen-sensitive is unknown. We here studied, in intact young and aged adult mice, drinking-water (1muM) estradiol effects on both retention and organizational components of hippocampus-dependent memory, using a radial-maze task of everyday-like memory. Demand on retention vs organization was manipulated by varying the time-interval separating repetitions of similar events. Estradiol increased performance in young and aged mice under minimized organizational demand, but failed to improve the age-associated memory impairment and diminished performance in young mice under high organizational demand. In fact, estradiol prolonged mnemonic retention of successive events without improving organization abilities, hence resulted in more proactive interference from irrelevant memories. c-Fos imaging of testing-induced brain activations showed that the deterioration of young memory was associated with dentate gyrus dysconnectivity, reminiscent of that seen in aged mice. Our findings support the view that estradiol is promnesic but also reveal that such property can paradoxically impair memory. These findings have important outcomes regarding health issues relative to the impact of environmental estrogens in the general population.





01/09/2015 | Biol Psychiatry   IF 10.3
Abnormal Fear Memory as a Model for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.
Desmedt A, Marighetto A, Piazza PV

Abstract:
For over a century, clinicians have consistently described the paradoxical co-existence in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) of sensory intrusive hypermnesia and declarative amnesia for the same traumatic event. Although this amnesia is considered as a critical etiological factor of the development and/or persistence of PTSD, most current animal models in basic neuroscience have focused exclusively on the hypermnesia, i.e., the persistence of a strong fear memory, neglecting the qualitative alteration of fear memory. The latest is characterized by an underrepresentation of the trauma in the context-based declarative memory system in favor of its overrepresentation in a cue-based sensory/emotional memory system. Combining psychological and neurobiological data as well as theoretical hypotheses, this review supports the idea that contextual amnesia is at the core of PTSD and its persistence and that altered hippocampal-amygdalar interaction may contribute to such pathologic memory. In a first attempt to unveil the neurobiological alterations underlying PTSD-related hypermnesia/amnesia, we describe a recent animal model mimicking in mice some critical aspects of such abnormal fear memory. Finally, this line of argument emphasizes the pressing need for a systematic comparison between normal/adaptive versus abnormal/maladaptive fear memory to identify biomarkers of PTSD while distinguishing them from general stress-related, potentially adaptive, neurobiological alterations.





11/08/2015 | stress   IF 2.7
Adaptive emotional memory: the key hippocampal-amygdalar interaction.
Desmedt A, Marighetto A, Richter-Levin G, Calandreau L

Abstract:
For centuries philosophical and clinical studies have emphasized a fundamental dichotomy between emotion and cognition, as, for instance, between behavioral/emotional memory and explicit/representative memory. However, the last few decades cognitive neuroscience have highlighted data indicating that emotion and cognition, as well as their underlying neural networks, are in fact in close interaction. First, it turns out that emotion can serve cognition, as exemplified by its critical contribution to decision-making or to the enhancement of episodic memory. Second, it is also observed that reciprocally cognitive processes as reasoning, conscious appraisal or explicit representation of events can modulate emotional responses, like promoting or reducing fear. Third, neurobiological data indicate that reciprocal amygdalar-hippocampal influences underlie such mutual regulation of emotion and cognition. While supporting this view, the present review discusses experimental data, obtained in rodents, indicating that the hippocampal and amygdalar systems not only regulate each other and their functional outcomes, but also qualify specific emotional memory representations through specific activations and interactions. Specifically, we review consistent behavioral, electrophysiological, pharmacological, biochemical and imaging data unveiling a direct contribution of both the amygdala and hippocampal-septal system to the identification of the predictor of a threat in different situations of fear conditioning. Our suggestion is that these two brain systems and their interplay determine the selection of relevant emotional stimuli, thereby contributing to the adaptive value of emotional memory. Hence, beyond the mutual quantitative regulation of these two brain systems described so far, we develop the idea that different activations of the hippocampus and amygdala, leading to specific configurations of neural activity, qualitatively impact the formation of emotional memory representations, thereby producing either adaptive or maladaptive fear memories.





31/07/2015 | Biol Psychiatry   IF 10.3
Temporal Memory and Its Enhancement by Estradiol Requires Surface Dynamics of Hippocampal CA1 N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors.
Potier M, Georges F, Brayda-Bruno L, Ladepeche L, Lamothe V, Al Abed AS, Groc L, Marighetto A

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Identifying the underlying cellular mechanisms of episodic memory is an important challenge, since this memory, based on temporal and contextual associations among events, undergoes preferential degradation in aging and various neuropsychiatric disorders. Memory storage of temporal and contextual associations is known to rely on hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity, which depends ex vivo on dynamic organization of surface NMDARs. Whether NMDAR surface trafficking sustains the formation of associative memory, however, remains unknown. METHODS: We tested this hypothesis, using single nanoparticle imaging, electrophysiology, and behavioral approaches, in hippocampal networks challenged with a potent modulator of NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity and memory, 17beta-estradiol (E2). RESULTS: We demonstrate that E2 modulates NMDAR surface trafficking, a necessary condition for E2-induced potentiation at hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 synapses. Strikingly, cornu ammonis 1 NMDAR surface trafficking controls basal and E2-enhanced mnemonic retention of temporal, but not contextual, associations. CONCLUSIONS: NMDAR surface trafficking and its modulation by the sex hormone E2 is a cellular mechanism critical for a major component of episodic memory, opening a new and noncanonical research avenue in the physiopathology of cognition.





Abstract:
The neuroimaging literature has shown consistent decreases in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity in the hippocampus of healthy older adults engaged in a navigation task. However, navigation in a virtual maze relies on spatial or response strategies known to depend on the hippocampus and caudate nucleus, respectively. Therefore, since the proportion of people using spatial strategies decreases with normal aging, we hypothesized that it was responsible for the observed decreases in fMRI activity in the hippocampus reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of aging on the hippocampus and caudate nucleus during navigation while taking into account individual navigational strategies. Young (N = 23) and older adults (N = 29) were tested using fMRI on the Concurrent Spatial Discrimination Learning Task, a radial task that dissociates between spatial and response strategies (in Stage 2) after participants reached criteria (in Stage 1). Success on Stage 2 requires that participants have encoded the spatial relationship between the target object and environmental landmarks, that is, the spatial strategy. While older adults required more trials, all participants reached criterion. fMRI results showed that, as a group, young adults had significant activity in the hippocampus as opposed to older adults who instead had significant activity in the caudate nucleus. Importantly, individual differences showed that the older participants who used a spatial strategy to solve the task had significant activity in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that the aging process involves a shift from using the hippocampus toward the caudate nucleus during navigation but that activity in the hippocampus is sustained in a subset of healthy older adults engaged in spatial strategies.





06/2013 | Neurobiol Dis   IF 5.6
Partial loss in septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons alters memory-dependent measures of brain connectivity without overt memory deficits.
Brayda-Bruno L, Mons N, Yee BK, Micheau J, Abrous DN, Nogues X, Marighetto A

Abstract:
The functional relevance of septo-hippocampal cholinergic (SHC) degeneration to the degradation of hippocampus-dependent declarative memory (DM) in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains ill-defined. Specifically, selective SHC lesions often fail to induce overt memory impairments in animal models. In spite of apparent normal performance, however, neuronal activity within relevant brain structures might be altered by SHC disruption. We hypothesized that partial SHC degeneration may contribute to functional alterations within memory circuits occurring in aging before DM decline. In young adult mice, we studied the effects of behaviorally ineffective (saporin-induced) SHC lesions - similar in extent to that seen in aged animals - on activity patterns and functional connectivity between three main neural memory systems: the septo-hippocampal system, the striatum and the amygdala that sustain declarative, procedural and emotional memory, respectively. Animals were trained in a radial maze procedure dissociating the human equivalents of relational/DM and non-R/DM expressions in animals. Test-induced Fos activation pattern revealed that the partial SHC lesion significantly altered the brain's functional activities and connectivity (co-activation pattern) despite the absence of overt behavioral deficit. Specifically, hippocampal CA3 hyperactivity and abnormal septo-hippocampo-amygdalar inter-connectivity resemble those observed in aging and prodromal AD. Hence, SHC neurons critically coordinate hippocampal function in concert with extra-hippocampal structures in accordance with specific mnemonic demand. Although partial SHC degeneration is not sufficient to impact DM performance by itself, the connectivity change might predispose the emergence of subsequent DM loss when, due to additional age-related insults, the brain can no longer compensate the holistic imbalance caused by cholinergic loss.





31/01/2013 | Neurobiol Dis   IF 5.6
Partial loss in septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons alters memory-dependent measures of brain connectivity without overt memory deficits.
Brayda-Bruno L, Mons N, Yee B K, Micheau J, Abrous DN, Nogues X, Marighetto A

Abstract:
The functional relevance of septo-hippocampal cholinergic (SHC) degeneration to the degradation of hippocampus-dependent declarative memory (DM) in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains ill-defined. Specifically, selective SHC lesions often fail to induce overt memory impairments in animal models. In spite of apparent normal performance, however, neuronal activity within relevant brain structures might be altered by SHC disruption. We hypothesized that partial SHC degeneration may contribute to functional alterations within memory circuits occurring in aging before DM decline. In young adult mice, we studied the effects of behaviorally ineffective (saporin-induced) SHC lesions - similar in extent to that seen in aged animals - on activity patterns and functional connectivity between three main neural memory systems: the septo-hippocampal system, the striatum and the amygdala that sustain declarative, procedural and emotional memory, respectively. Animals were trained in a radial maze procedure dissociating the human equivalents of relational/DM and non-R/DM expressions in animals. Test-induced Fos activation pattern revealed that the partial SHC lesion significantly altered the brain's functional activities and connectivity (co-activation pattern) despite the absence of overt behavioral deficit. Specifically, hippocampal CA3 hyperactivity and abnormal septo-hippocampo-amygdalar inter-connectivity resemble those observed in aging and prodromal AD. Hence, SHC neurons critically coordinate hippocampal function in concert with extra-hippocampal structures in accordance with specific mnemonic demand. Although partial SHC degeneration is not sufficient to impact DM performance by itself, the connectivity change might predispose the emergence of subsequent DM loss when, due to additional age-related insults, the brain can no longer compensate the holistic imbalance caused by cholinergic loss.





17/05/2012 | Hippocampus   IF 5.5
Juvenile, but not adult exposure to high-fat diet impairs relational memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.
Boitard C, Etchamendy N, Sauvant J, Aubert A, Tronel S, Marighetto A, Laye S, Ferreira G

Abstract:
Increased consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) leads to obesity and adverse neurocognitive outcomes. Childhood and adolescence are important periods of brain maturation shaping cognitive function. These periods could consequently be particularly sensitive to the detrimental effects of HFD intake. In mice, juvenile and adulthood consumption of HFD induce similar morphometric and metabolic changes. However, only juvenile exposure to HFD abolishes relational memory flexibility, assessed after initial radial-maze concurrent spatial discrimination learning, and decreases neurogenesis. Our results identify a critical period of development covering adolescence with higher sensitivity to HFD-induced hippocampal dysfunction at both behavioral and cellular levels. (c) 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.





04/2012 | Hippocampus   IF 5.5
Evidence for a virtual human analog of a rodent relational memory task: a study of aging and fMRI in young adults.
Etchamendy N, Konishi K, Pike GB, Marighetto A, Bohbot VD

Abstract:
A radial maze concurrent spatial discrimination learning paradigm consisting of two stages was previously designed to assess the flexibility property of relational memory in mice, as a model of human declarative memory. Aged mice and young adult mice with damage to the hippocampus, learned accurately Stage 1 of the task which required them to learn a constant reward location in a specific set of arms (i.e., learning phase). In contrast, they were impaired relative to healthy young adult mice in a second stage when faced with rearrangements of the same arms (i.e., flexibility probes). This mnemonic inflexibility in Stage 2 is thought to derive from insufficient relational processing by the hippocampus during initial learning (Stage 1) which favors stimulus-response learning, a form of procedural learning. This was proposed as a model of the selective declarative and relational memory decline classically described in elderly people. As a first step to examine the validity of this model, we adapted this protocol to humans using a virtual radial-maze. (1) We showed that performance in the flexibility probes in young and older adults positively correlated with performance in a wayfinding task, suggesting that our paradigm assesses relational memory. (2) We demonstrated that older healthy participants displayed a deficit in the performance of the flexibility probes (Stage 2), similar to the one previously seen in aged mice. This was associated with a decline in the wayfinding task. (3) Our fMRI data in young adults confirmed that hippocampal activation during early discrimination learning in Stage 1 correlated with memory flexibility in Stage 2, whereas caudate nucleus activation in Stage 1 negatively correlated with subsequent flexibility. By enabling relational memory assessment in mice and humans, our radial-maze paradigm provides a valuable tool for translational research.





23/02/2012 | Science   IF 31
Glucocorticoids Can Induce PTSD-Like Memory Impairments in Mice.
Kaouane N, Porte Y, Vallee M, Brayda-Bruno L, Mons N, Calandreau L, Marighetto A, Piazza PV, Desmedt A

Abstract:
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by a hypermnesia of the trauma and by a memory impairment that decreases the ability to restrict fear to the appropriate context. Infusion of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus after fear conditioning induces PTSD-like memory impairments and an altered pattern of neural activation in the hippocampal-amygdalar circuit. Mice become unable to identify the context as the right predictor of the threat and show fear responses for a discrete cue non-predicting the threat in normal conditions. These data demonstrate PTSD-like memory impairments in rodents and identify a potential pathophysiological mechanism of this condition.





14/02/2012 | Behav Brain Res   IF 3.3
Functions for adult neurogenesis in memory: an introduction to the neurocomputational approach and to its contribution.
Nogues X, Corsini MM, Marighetto A, Abrous DN

Abstract:
Until recently, it was believed that the introduction of new neurons in neuronal networks was incompatible with memory function. Since the rediscovery of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, behavioral data demonstrate that adult neurogenesis is required for memory processing. We examine neurocomputational studies to identify which basic mechanisms involved in memory might be mediated by adult neurogenesis. Mainly, adult neurogenesis might be involved in the reduction of catastrophic interference and in a time-related pattern separation function. Artificial neuronal networks suggest that the selective recruitment of new-born or old neurons is not stochastic, but depends on environmental requirements. This leads us to propose the novel concept of 'soft-supervision'. Soft-supervision would be a biologically plausible process, by which the environment is able to influence activation and learning rules of neurons differentially.





2012 | Curr Top Behav Neurosci
Studying the impact of aging on memory systems: contribution of two behavioral models in the mouse.
Marighetto A, Brayda-Bruno L, Etchamendy N

Abstract:
In the present chapter, we describe our own attempts to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of memory in aging. First, we tried to improve animal models of memory degradations occurring in aging, and develop common behavioral tools between mice and humans. Second, we began to use these behavioral tools to identify the molecular/intracellular changes occurring within the integrate network of memory systems in order to bridge the gap between the molecular and system level of analysis. The chapter is divided into three parts (i) modeling aging-related degradation in declarative memory (DM) in mice, (ii) assessing the main components of working memory (WM) with a common radial-maze task in mice and humans and (iii) studying the role of the retinoid cellular signaling path in aging-related changes in memory systems.





2012 | Int J Mol Sci   IF 2.5
Effects of Methylmercury Contained in a Diet Mimicking the Wayana Amerindians Contamination through Fish Consumption: Mercury Accumulation, Metallothionein Induction, Gene Expression Variations, and Role of the Chemokine CCL2.
Bourdineaud JP, Laclau M, Maury-Brachet R, Gonzalez P, Baudrimont M, Mesmer-Dudons N, Fujimura M, Marighetto A, Godefroy D, Rostene W, Brethes D

Abstract:
Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and human beings are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. We addressed the question of whether a diet mimicking the fish consumption of Wayanas Amerindians from French Guiana could result in observable adverse effects in mice. Wayanas adult men are subjected to a mean mercurial dose of 7 g Hg/week/kg of body weight. We decided to supplement a vegetarian-based mice diet with 0.1% of lyophilized Hoplias aimara fish, which Wayanas are fond of and equivalent to the same dose as that afflicting the Wayanas Amerindians. Total mercury contents were 1.4 +/- 0.2 and 5.4 +/- 0.5 ng Hg/g of food pellets for the control and aimara diets, respectively. After 14 months of exposure, the body parts and tissues displaying the highest mercury concentration on a dry weight (dw) basis were hair (733 ng/g) and kidney (511 ng/g), followed by the liver (77 ng/g). Surprisingly, despite the fact that MeHg is a neurotoxic compound, the brain accumulated low levels of mercury (35 ng/g in the cortex). The metallothionein (MT) protein concentration only increased in those tissues (kidney, muscles) in which MeHg demethylation had occurred. This can be taken as a molecular sign of divalent mercurial contamination since only Hg(2+) has been reported yet to induce MT accumulation in contaminated tissues. The suppression of the synthesis of the chemokine CCL2 in the corresponding knockout (KO) mice resulted in important changes in gene expression patterns in the liver and brain. After three months of exposure to an aimara-containing diet, eight of 10 genes selected (Sdhb, Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mt2, Mdr1a and Bax) were repressed in wild-type mice liver whereas none presented a differential expression in KO Ccl2(-/-) mice. In the wild-type mice brain, six of 12 genes selected (Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mdr1a and Bax) presented a stimulated expression, whereas all remained at the basal level of expression in KO Ccl2(-/-) mice. In the liver of aimara-fed mice, histological alterations were observed for an accumulated mercury concentration as low as 32 ng/g, dw, and metal deposits were observed within the cytoplasm of hepatic cells.





03/12/2010 | Behav Brain Res   IF 2.6
Acetylcholine and memory: A long, complex and chaotic but still living
Micheau J, Marighetto A

Abstract:
Even though 'procholinergic' drugs are almost the sole kind of treatments





05/2009 | Neurobiol Aging
Age-related accumulation of Reelin in amyloid-like deposits.
Knuesel I, Nyffeler M, Mormede C, Muhia M, Meyer U, Pietropaolo S, Yee BK, Pryce CR, LaFerla FM, Marighetto A, Feldon J

Abstract:
Accumulating evidence suggest that alterations in Reelin-mediated signaling may





07/2008 | J Psychopharmacol
Comparative effects of the dopaminergic agonists piribedil and bromocriptine in
Marighetto A, Valerio S, Philippin JN, Bertaina-Anglade V, Drieu la Rochelle C, Jaffard R, Morain P

Abstract:
The potential memory-enhancing properties of two dopamine agonists currently used





05/2008 | Behav Pharmacol
The AMPA modulator S 18986 improves declarative and working memory performances
Marighetto A, Valerio S, Jaffard R, Mormede C, Munoz C, Bernard K, Morain P

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to further characterize the memory-enhancing profile of





Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: The comparative effects of a newly described specific alpha7 nAChR partial agonist, S 24795, and a cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, currently used as a symptomatic Alzheimer's disease treatment were studied in two mouse models of aging-related memory deficits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We employed radial arm-maze paradigms assessing short-term working memory (STWM, experiment A) and mnemonic flexibility, a cardinal property of long-term declarative (LTDM, experiment B). Both compounds were administered daily at 0.3 and 1 mg/kg subcutaneously (~3 weeks). RESULTS: In the STWM experiment, vehicle-treated aged mice displayed a severe and persistent deficit in the retention of successive arm visits in comparison to younger controls. S 24795 at 1 mg/kg (trends at 0.3 mg/kg) and donepezil at 0.3 mg/kg (but not 1 mg/kg) exerted beneficial effects on this deficit: The performance of aged mice treated with these drugs remarkably increased across the testing days and almost reached young adult performance level. In the critical test trials of memory flexibility (i.e., LTDM), in experiment B, S 24795 at 1 mg/kg (trends at 0.3 mg/kg) and donepezil at the dose of 1 mg/kg (but not 0.3 mg/kg) improved aged mice performance. CONCLUSION: This preclinical demonstration that S 24795 restored specific age-related memory deficits with as much efficacy as donepezil adds to recent literature in highlighting the potential interest of an alpha7 nAChR drug as a symptomatic AD therapeutic.





02/01/2008 | J Neurosci
Retinoid hyposignaling contributes to aging-related decline in hippocampal
Mingaud F, Mormede C, Etchamendy N, Mons N, Niedergang B, Wietrzych M, Pallet V, Jaffard R, Krezel W, Higueret P, Marighetto A

Abstract:
An increasing body of evidence indicates that the vitamin A metabolite retinoic





2008 | Environ Health
Feeding mice with diets containing mercury-contaminated fish flesh from French
Bourdineaud JP, Bellance N, Benard G, Brethes D, Fujimura M, Gonzalez P, Marighetto A, Maury-Brachet R, Mormede C, Pedron V, Philippin JN, Rossignol R, Rostene W, Sawada M, Laclau M

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: In 2005, 84% of Wayana Amerindians living in the upper marshes of the





2007 | Hippocampus
The hippocampus plays a critical role at encoding discontiguous events for
Mingaud F, Le Moine C, Etchamendy N, Mormede C, Jaffard R, Marighetto A

Abstract:
The hypothesis that hippocampal activity at encoding is causally related to





27/12/2006 | J Neurosci
Extracellular hippocampal acetylcholine level controls amygdala function and
Calandreau L, Trifilieff P, Mons N, Costes L, Marien M, Marighetto A, Micheau J, Jaffard R, Desmedt A

Abstract:
Ample data indicate that tone and contextual fear conditioning differentially





17/12/2003 | Behav Brain Res
Age-dependent effects of moderate chronic ethanol administration on different
Krazem A, Marighetto A, Higueret P, Jaffard R

Abstract:
A large number of studies have investigated the effects of chronic ethanol





17/10/2003 | Behav Brain Res
Vitamin A deficiency and relational memory deficit in adult mice: relationships
Etchamendy N, Enderlin V, Marighetto A, Pallet V, Higueret P, Jaffard R

Abstract:
Vitamin A and its derivatives, the retinoids, have recently been reported to be





05/2003 | Eur J Neurosci
The effects of ibotenic hippocampal lesions on discriminative fear conditioning
Desmedt A, Marighetto A, Garcia R, Jaffard R

Abstract:
To what extent the hippocampus is required for contextual conditioning remains a





02/2003 | Eur J Neurosci
Fos imaging reveals ageing-related changes in hippocampal response to radial maze
Touzani K, Marighetto A, Jaffard R

Abstract:
A two-stage radial arm maze (RAM) task has been designed recently to demonstrate





2003 | Hippocampus
Hippocampal lesions and discrimination performance of mice in the radial maze:
Etchamendy N, Desmedt A, Cortes-Torrea C, Marighetto A, Jaffard R

Abstract:
The effects of ibotenate hippocampal lesions on discrimination performance in an





15/08/2001 | J Neurosci
Alleviation of a selective age-related relational memory deficit in mice by
Etchamendy N, Enderlin V, Marighetto A, Vouimba RM, Pallet V, Jaffard R, Higueret P

Abstract:
Vitamin A and its derivatives, the retinoids, have been implicated recently in





07/2000 | Therapie
[An animal model of human declarative (relational) memory and of its dysfunction].
Jaffard R, Etchamendy N, Desmedt A, Krazem A, Cortes-Torrea C, Marighetto A

Abstract:
The present work was aimed at determining, both at the psychological and at the neurobiological levels, aspects of rodent memory that fall into line with human declarative memory which is known to be selectively impaired in amnesic subjects and during the course of ageing. The ability to compare and to contrast items in memory, and to support inferential use of memories in novel situations (flexibility), were considered to be the two key psychological features of human declarative memory that were altered by both hippocampal lesions and hippocampal dysfunction. Adult and aged mice were trained on learning tasks using two-stage paradigms, the aim of which was to assess memory performance through these two psychological aspects in the same subjects. Results suggest that ageing specifically impairs the ability to both compare and contrast items in memory (declarative/relational memory based on complex associations), without altering memory based on simple S-R associations (procedural memory). Hippocampal lesions in adult mice produced the same dissociation between relational memory (impaired) and procedural memory (spared). Pharmacological experiments showed that, depending on the drug used, the relational memory deficit of aged mice may be selectively reversed (i.e. without changes in procedural memory) and that the behavioural efficacy of certain treatments was shown to parallel their potency in re-establishing normal (i.e. adult) levels of hippocampal plasticity-related mechanisms. Together with previous findings, these results suggest that the storage and use of relational representations would critically depend on the plasticity of hippocampal synapses, which via their connections with cortical areas, would support the storage of associations between perceptual, behavioral and cognitive events.





05/2000 | Learn Mem
Further evidence for a dissociation between different forms of mnemonic
Marighetto A, Touzani K, Etchamendy N, Torrea CC, De Nanteuil G, Guez D, Jaffard R, Morain P

Abstract:
It has been demonstrated previously on the radial maze that the emergence of an





09/1999 | Eur J Neurosci
Knowing which and knowing what: a potential mouse model for age-related human
Marighetto A, Etchamendy N, Touzani K, Torrea CC, Yee BK, Rawlins JN, Jaffard R

Abstract:
The present study was built on the original report of Eichenbaum et al.





04/1998 | Exp Brain Res
The effects of cytotoxic entorhinal lesions and electrolytic medial septal
Marighetto A, Yee BK, Rawlins JN

Abstract:
Rats with lesions either of medial septal nucleus (MSN) or the entorhinal cortex





09/03/1998 | Neuroreport
Cytosolic hippocampal PKC and aging: correlation with discrimination performance.
Pascale A, Nogues X, Marighetto A, Micheau J, Battaini F, Govoni S, Jaffard R

Abstract:
Adult and aged mice were submitted to a discrimination task in a radial maze





1996 | J Physiol Paris
Long-term potentiation and long-term depression in the lateral septum in spatial
Jaffard R, Vouimba RM, Marighetto A, Garcia R

Abstract:
We report two experiments conducted on a radial arm maze in the mouse showing





11/1994 | Pharmacol Biochem Behav
Effects of intraseptally injected glutamatergic drugs on hippocampal
Marighetto A, Micheau J, Jaffard R

Abstract:
We have previously reported that spatial reference memory (RM) training-induced





25/07/1994 | Brain Res
Effects of intraseptally injected noradrenergic drugs on hippocampal
Marighetto A, Jaffard R, Micheau J

Abstract:
It has been shown in numerous studies that memory testing can alter presynaptic





30/09/1993 | Behav Brain Res
Relationships between testing-induced alterations of hippocampal cholinergic
Marighetto A, Micheau J, Jaffard R

Abstract:
Alterations in hippocampal cholinergic activity associated with different types





02/1991 | Behav Pharmacol
Effects of tianeptine on spontaneous alternation, simple and concurrent spatial
Jaffard R, Mocaer E, Poignant JC, Micheau J, Marighetto A, Meunier M, Beracochea D

Abstract:
The effects of systemic administration of tianeptine, a new psychotropic agent





09/1990 | Neurobiol Aging
A comparison of the working memory performances of young and aged mice combined
Lebrun C, Durkin TP, Marighetto A, Jaffard R

Abstract:
The spatial working memory performances of young (2 months) and aged (24-26





11/1989 | Pharmacol Biochem Behav
Septal alpha-noradrenergic antagonism in vivo blocks the testing-induced
Marighetto A, Durkin T, Toumane A, Lebrun C, Jaffard R

Abstract:
In order to test the hypothesis that alpha-noradrenergic receptors in the septum





09/1989 | Behav Neural Biol
The durations of hippocampal and cortical cholinergic activation induced by
Toumane A, Durkin T, Marighetto A, Jaffard R

Abstract:
Sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake velocities in P2 fractions of the





1989 | Arch Gerontol Geriatr Suppl
Experimental dissociation of memory systems in mice: behavioral and neurochemical
Jaffard R, Durkin T, Toumane A, Marighetto A, Lebrun C

Abstract:
Evidence for different types of memory in mice may lead to development of animal





10/1988 | Behav Brain Res
Differential hippocampal and cortical cholinergic activation during the
Toumane A, Durkin T, Marighetto A, Galey D, Jaffard R

Abstract:
Possible differentiation of the intervention of cholinergic septohippocampal and