Publications du Neurocentre Magendie

Les publications







IF du Neurocentre
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782 publications

* equal contribution
Les IF indiqués ont été collectés par le Web of Sciences en Juin 2020



10/2018 | Curr Opin Neurobiol   IF 6.5
Neuronal coding mechanisms mediating fear behavior.
Rozeske RR, Herry C

Abstract:
The behavioral repertoire of an organism can be highly diverse, spanning from social to defensive. How an animal efficiently switches between distinct behaviors is a fundamental question whose inquiry will provide insights into the mechanisms that are necessary for an organism's survival. Previous work aimed at identifying the neural systems responsible for defensive behaviors, such as freezing, has demonstrated critical interactions between the prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Indeed, this foundational research has provided an indispensable anatomical framework that investigators are now using to understand the physiological mechanisms of defined neural circuits within the prefrontal cortex that code for the rapid and flexible expression of defensive behaviors. Here we review recent findings demonstrating temporal and rate coding mechanisms of freezing behavior in the prefrontal cortex. We hypothesize that anatomical features, such as target structure and cortical layer, as well as the nature of the information to be coded, may be critical factors determining the coding scheme. Furthermore, detailed behavioral analyses may reveal subtypes of defensive behaviors that represent the principle factor governing coding selection.





23/09/2018 | Exp Neurol   IF 4.5
Serotonin2B receptors in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus exert a GABA-mediated tonic inhibitory control on serotonin neurons.
Cathala A, Devroye C, Drutel G, Revest JM, Artigas F, Spampinato U

Abstract:
The central serotonin2B receptor (5-HT2BR) is a well-established modulator of dopamine (DA) neuron activity in the rodent brain. Recent studies in rats have shown that the effect of 5-HT2BR antagonists on accumbal and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) DA outflow results from a primary action in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), where they activate 5-HT neurons innervating the mPFC. Although the mechanisms underlying this interaction remain largely unknown, data in the literature suggest the involvement of DRN GABAergic interneurons in the control of 5-HT activity. The present study examined this hypothesis using in vivo (intracerebral microdialysis) and in vitro (immunohistochemistry coupled to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) experimental approaches in rats. Intraperitoneal (0.16mg/kg) or intra-DRN (1muM) administration of the selective 5-HT2BR antagonist RS 127445 increased 5-HT outflow in both the DRN and the mPFC, these effects being prevented by the intra-DRN perfusion of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (100muM), as well as by the subcutaneous (0.16mg/kg) or the intra-DRN (0.1muM) administration of the selective 5-HT1AR antagonist WAY 100635. The increase in DRN 5-HT outflow induced by the intra-DRN administration of the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram (0.1muM) was potentiated by the intra-DRN administration (0.5muM) of RS 127445 only in the absence of bicuculline perfusion. Finally, in vitro experiments revealed the presence of the 5-HT2BR mRNA on DRN GABAergic interneurons. Altogether, these results show that, in the rat DRN, 5-HT2BRs are located on GABAergic interneurons, and exert a tonic inhibitory control on 5-HT neurons innervating the mPFC.





Abstract:
In nonhuman mammals and in particular in rodents, most granule neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG) are generated during development and yet little is known about their properties compared with adult-born neurons. Although it is generally admitted that these populations are morphologically indistinguishable once mature, a detailed analysis of developmentally born neurons is lacking. Here, we used in vivo electroporation to label dentate granule cells (DGCs) generated in mouse embryos (E14.5) or in neonates (P0) and followed their morphological development up to 6 months after birth. By comparison with mature retrovirus-labeled DGCs born at weaning (P21) or young adult (P84) stages, we provide the evidence that perinatally born neurons, especially embryonically born cells, are morphologically distinct from later-born neurons and are thus easily distinguishable. In addition, our data indicate that semilunar and hilar GCs, 2 populations in ectopic location, are generated during the embryonic and the neonatal periods, respectively. Thus, our findings provide new insights into the development of the different populations of GCs in the DG and open new questions regarding their function in the brain.





23/08/2018 | Neuron   IF 14.3
Hippocampal CB1 Receptors Control Incidental Associations.
Busquets-Garcia A, Oliveira da Cruz JF, Terral G, Zottola ACP, Soria-Gomez E, Contini A, Martin H, Redon B, Varilh M, Ioannidou C, Drago F, Massa F, Fioramonti X, Trifilieff P, Ferreira G, Marsicano G

Abstract:
By priming brain circuits, associations between low-salience stimuli often guide future behavioral choices through a process known as mediated or inferred learning. However, the precise neurobiological mechanisms of these incidental associations are largely unknown. Using sensory preconditioning procedures, we show that type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) in hippocampal GABAergic neurons are necessary and sufficient for mediated but not direct learning. Deletion and re-expression of CB1R in hippocampal GABAergic neurons abolishes and rescues mediated learning, respectively. Interestingly, paired presentations of low-salience sensory cues induce a specific protein synthesis-dependent enhancement of hippocampal CB1R expression and facilitate long-term synaptic plasticity at inhibitory synapses. CB1R blockade or chemogenetic manipulations of hippocampal GABAergic neurons upon preconditioning affect incidental associations, as revealed by impaired mediated learning. Thus, CB1R-dependent control of inhibitory hippocampal neurotransmission mediates incidental associations, allowing future associative inference, a fundamental process for everyday life, which is altered in major neuropsychiatric diseases.





09/07/2018 | Sci Rep   IF 4.1
Shifts of Faecal Microbiota During Sporadic Colorectal Carcinogenesis.
Mori G, Rampelli S, Orena BS, Rengucci C, De Maio G, Barbieri G, Passardi A, Casadei Gardini A, Frassineti GL, Gaiarsa S, Albertini AM, Ranzani GN, Calistri D, Pasca MR

Abstract:
Gut microbiota has been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of colorectal cancer. The development of colorectal cancer is a multistep process by which healthy epithelium slowly develops into preneoplastic lesions, which in turn progress into malignant carcinomas over time. In particular, sporadic colorectal cancers can arise from adenomas (about 85% of cases) or serrated polyps through the 'adenoma-carcinoma' or the 'serrated polyp-carcinoma' sequences, respectively. In this study, we performed 16 S rRNA gene sequencing of bacterial DNA extracted from faecal samples to compare the microbiota of healthy subjects and patients with different preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. We identified putative microbial biomarkers associated with stage-specific progression of colorectal cancer. In particular, bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla, as well as members of the Lachnospiraceae family, proved to be specific of the faecal microbiota of patients with preneoplastic lesions, including adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. On the other hand, two families of the Proteobacteria phylum, Alcaligeneaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, with Sutterella and Escherichia/Shigella being the most representative genera, appeared to be associated with malignancy. These findings, once confirmed on larger cohorts of patients, can represent an important step towards the development of more effective diagnostic strategies.





21/06/2018 | cell physiol biochem   IF 5.5
Galphai Proteins are Indispensable for Hearing.
Beer-Hammer S, Lee SC, Mauriac SA, Leiss V, Groh IAM, Novakovic A, Piekorz RP, Bucher K, Chen C, Ni K, Singer W, Harasztosi C, Schimmang T, Zimmermann U, Pfeffer K, Birnbaumer L, Forge A, Montcouquiol M, Knipper M, Nurnberg B, Ruttiger L

Abstract:
BACKGROUND/AIMS: From invertebrates to mammals, Galphai proteins act together with their common binding partner Gpsm2 to govern cell polarization and planar organization in virtually any polarized cell. Recently, we demonstrated that Galphai3-deficiency in pre-hearing murine cochleae pointed to a role of Galphai3 for asymmetric migration of the kinocilium as well as the orientation and shape of the stereociliary ('hair') bundle, a requirement for the progression of mature hearing. We found that the lack of Galphai3 impairs stereociliary elongation and hair bundle shape in high-frequency cochlear regions, linked to elevated hearing thresholds for high-frequency sound. How these morphological defects translate into hearing phenotypes is not clear. METHODS: Here, we studied global and conditional Gnai3 and Gnai2 mouse mutants deficient for either one or both Galphai proteins. Comparative analyses of global versus Foxg1-driven conditional mutants that mainly delete in the inner ear and telencephalon in combination with functional tests were applied to dissect essential and redundant functions of different Galphai isoforms and to assign specific defects to outer or inner hair cells, the auditory nerve, satellite cells or central auditory neurons. RESULTS: Here we report that lack of Galphai3 but not of the ubiquitously expressed Galphai2 elevates hearing threshold, accompanied by impaired hair bundle elongation and shape in high-frequency cochlear regions. During the crucial reprogramming of the immature inner hair cell (IHC) synapse into a functional sensory synapse of the mature IHC deficiency for Galphai2 or Galphai3 had no impact. In contrast, double-deficiency for Galphai2 and Galphai3 isoforms results in abnormalities along the entire tonotopic axis including profound deafness associated with stereocilia defects. In these mice, postnatal IHC synapse maturation is also impaired. In addition, the analysis of conditional versus global Galphai3-deficient mice revealed that the amplitude of ABR wave IV was disproportionally elevated in comparison to ABR wave I indicating that Galphai3 is selectively involved in generation of neural gain during auditory processing. CONCLUSION: We propose a so far unrecognized complexity of isoform-specific and overlapping Galphai protein functions particular during final differentiation processes.





20/06/2018 | bio protoc
Protocols to Study Declarative Memory Formation in Mice and Humans: Optogenetics and Translational Behavioral Approaches
Sellami A, Al abed S, Brayda-Bruno L, Etchamendy N, Valerio S, Oule M, Pantaleon L, Lamothe V, Potier M, Bernard K, Jabourian M, Herry C, Mons N, Marighetto A



11/06/2018 | Sci Rep   IF 4.1
D5 dopamine receptors control glutamatergic AMPA transmission between the motor cortex and subthalamic nucleus.
Froux L, Le Bon-Jego M, Miguelez C, Normand E, Morin S, Fioramonti S, Barresi M, Frick A, Baufreton J, Taupignon A

Abstract:
Corticofugal fibers target the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a component nucleus of the basal ganglia, in addition to the striatum, their main input. The cortico-subthalamic, or hyperdirect, pathway, is thought to supplement the cortico-striatal pathways in order to interrupt/change planned actions. To explore the previously unknown properties of the neurons that project to the STN, retrograde and anterograde tools were used to specifically identify them in the motor cortex and selectively stimulate their synapses in the STN. The cortico-subthalamic neurons exhibited very little sag and fired an initial doublet followed by non-adapting action potentials. In the STN, AMPA/kainate synaptic currents had a voltage-dependent conductance, indicative of GluA2-lacking receptors and were partly inhibited by Naspm. AMPA transmission displayed short-term depression, with the exception of a limited bandpass in the 5 to 15 Hz range. AMPA synaptic currents were negatively controlled by dopamine D5 receptors. The reduction in synaptic strength was due to postsynaptic D5 receptors, mediated by a PKA-dependent pathway, but did not involve a modified rectification index. Our data indicated that dopamine, through post-synaptic D5 receptors, limited the cortical drive onto STN neurons in the normal brain.





06/06/2018 | Neuron   IF 14.3
Astroglial CB1 Receptors Determine Synaptic D-Serine Availability to Enable Recognition Memory.
Robin LM*, Cruz J*, Oliveira da Cruz JF, Langlais VC, Martin-Fernandez M, Metna-Laurent M, Busquets-Garcia A, Bellocchio L, Soria-Gomez E, Papouin T, Varilh M, Sherwood MW, Belluomo I, Balcells G, Matias I, Bosier B, Drago F, Van Eeckhaut A, Smolders I, Georges F, Araque A, Panatier A, Oliet SHR*, Marsicano G*

Abstract:
Bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes shapes synaptic plasticity and behavior. D-serine is a necessary co-agonist of synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), but the physiological factors regulating its impact on memory processes are scantly known. We show that astroglial CB1 receptors are key determinants of object recognition memory by determining the availability of D-serine at hippocampal synapses. Mutant mice lacking CB1 receptors from astroglial cells (GFAP-CB1-KO) displayed impaired object recognition memory and decreased in vivo and in vitro long-term potentiation (LTP) at CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses. Activation of CB1 receptors increased intracellular astroglial Ca(2+) levels and extracellular levels of D-serine in hippocampal slices. Accordingly, GFAP-CB1-KO displayed lower occupancy of the co-agonist binding site of synaptic hippocampal NMDARs. Finally, elevation of D-serine levels fully rescued LTP and memory impairments of GFAP-CB1-KO mice. These data reveal a novel mechanism of in vivo astroglial control of memory and synaptic plasticity via the D-serine-dependent control of NMDARs.





31/05/2018 | Cell   IF 31.4
Corticoamygdala Transfer of Socially Derived Information Gates Observational Learning.
Allsop SA, Wichmann R, Mills F, Burgos-Robles A, Chang CJ, Felix-Ortiz AC, Vienne A, Beyeler A, Izadmehr EM, Glober G, Cum MI, Stergiadou J, Anandalingam KK, Farris K, Namburi P, Leppla CA, Weddington JC, Nieh EH, Smith AC, Ba D, Brown EN, Tye KM

Abstract:
Observational learning is a powerful survival tool allowing individuals to learn about threat-predictive stimuli without directly experiencing the pairing of the predictive cue and punishment. This ability has been linked to the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the basolateral amygdala (BLA). To investigate how information is encoded and transmitted through this circuit, we performed electrophysiological recordings in mice observing a demonstrator mouse undergo associative fear conditioning and found that BLA-projecting ACC (ACC-->BLA) neurons preferentially encode socially derived aversive cue information. Inhibition of ACC-->BLA alters real-time amygdala representation of the aversive cue during observational conditioning. Selective inhibition of the ACC-->BLA projection impaired acquisition, but not expression, of observational fear conditioning. We show that information derived from observation about the aversive value of the cue is transmitted from the ACC to the BLA and that this routing of information is critically instructive for observational fear conditioning. VIDEO ABSTRACT.





25/05/2018 | Nat Commun   IF 12.4
Author Correction: Defective Gpsm2/Galphai3 signalling disrupts stereocilia development and growth cone actin dynamics in Chudley-McCullough syndrome.
Mauriac SA, Hien YE, Bird JE, Carvalho SD, Peyroutou R, Lee SC, Moreau MM, Blanc JM, Gezer A, Medina C, Thoumine O, Beer-Hammer S, Friedman TB, Ruttiger L, Forge A, Nurnberg B, Sans N, Montcouquiol M

Abstract:
This corrects the article DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14907.





23/05/2018 | Nat Commun   IF 12.4
Combining laser capture microdissection and proteomics reveals an active translation machinery controlling invadosome formation.
Ezzoukhry Z, Henriet E, Cordelieres FP, Dupuy JW, Maitre M, Gay N, Di-Tommaso S, Mercier L, Goetz JG, Peter M, Bard F, Moreau V, Raymond AA, Saltel F

Abstract:
Invadosomes are F-actin-based structures involved in extracellular matrix degradation, cell invasion, and metastasis formation. Analyzing their proteome is crucial to decipher their molecular composition, to understand their mechanisms, and to find specific elements to target them. However, the specific analysis of invadosomes is challenging, because it is difficult to maintain their integrity during isolation. In addition, classical purification methods often suffer from contaminations, which may impair data validation. To ensure the specific identification of invadosome components, we here develop a method that combines laser microdissection and mass spectrometry, enabling the analysis of subcellular structures in their native state based on low amounts of input material. Using this combinatorial method, we show that invadosomes contain specific components of the translational machinery, in addition to known marker proteins. Moreover, functional validation reveals that protein translation activity is an inherent property of invadosomes, which is required to maintain invadosome structure and activity.





18/04/2018 | Cereb Cortex   IF 6.3
Dysfunctional Autism Risk Genes Cause Circuit-Specific Connectivity Deficits With Distinct Developmental Trajectories
Zerbi Valerio, Giovanna D. Ielacqua, Marija Markicevic, Matthias Georg Haberl, Mark H. Ellisman, A-Bhaskaran A, Frick A, Markus Rudin, Nicole Wenderoth

Abstract:
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a set of complex neurodevelopmental disorders for which there is currently no targeted therapeutic approach. It is thought that alterations of genes regulating migration and synapse formation during development affect neural circuit formation and result in aberrant connectivity within distinct circuits that underlie abnormal behaviors. However, it is unknown whether deviant developmental trajectories are circuit-speciï¬c for a given autism risk-gene. We used MRI to probe changes in functional and structural connectivity from childhood to adulthood in Fragile-X (Fmr1â/y) and contactin-associated (CNTNAP2â/â) knockout mice. Young Fmr1â/y mice (30 days postnatal) presented with a robust hypoconnectivity phenotype in corticocortico and corticostriatal circuits in areas associated with sensory information processing, which was maintained until adulthood. Conversely, only small differences in hippocampal and striatal areas were present during early postnatal development in CNTNAP2â/â mice, while major connectivity deï¬cits in prefrontal and limbic pathways developed between adolescence and adulthood. These ï¬ndings are supported by viral tracing and electron micrograph approaches and deï¬ne 2 clearly distinct connectivity endophenotypes within the autism spectrum. We conclude that the genetic background of ASD strongly inï¬uences which circuits are most affected, the nature of the phenotype, and the developmental time course of the associated changes.





18/04/2018 | cell stem cell   IF 23.3
Human Adult Neurogenesis: Evidence and Remaining Questions.
Kempermann G, Gage FH, Aigner L, Song H, Curtis MA, Thuret S, Kuhn HG, Jessberger S, Frankland PW, Cameron HA, Gould E, Hen R, Abrous DN, Toni N, Schinder AF, Zhao X, Lucassen PJ, Frisen J

Abstract:
Renewed discussion about whether or not adult neurogenesis exists in the human hippocampus, and the nature and strength of the supporting evidence, has been reignited by two prominently published reports with opposite conclusions. Here, we summarize the state of the field and argue that there is currently no reason to abandon the idea that adult-generated neurons make important functional contributions to neural plasticity and cognition across the human lifespan.





13/04/2018 | Mol Metab   IF 6.3
mTORC1-dependent increase in oxidative metabolism in POMC neurons regulates food intake and action of leptin.
Haissaguerre M, Ferriere A, Simon V, Saucisse N, Dupuy N, Andre C, Clark S, Guzman-Quevedo O, Tabarin A, Cota D

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Nutrient availability modulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the hypothalamus. In turn, ROS regulate hypothalamic neuronal activity and feeding behavior. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is an important cellular integrator of the action of nutrients and hormones. Here we tested the hypothesis that modulation of mTORC1 activity, particularly in Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, mediates the cellular and behavioral effects of ROS. METHODS: C57BL/6J mice or controls and their knockout (KO) littermates deficient either for the mTORC1 downstream target 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) or for the mTORC1 component Rptor specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-rptor-KO) were treated with an intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or the ROS scavenger honokiol, alone or, respectively, in combination with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin or the mTORC1 activator leptin. Oxidant-related signal in POMC neurons was assessed using dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence. RESULTS: Icv administration of H2O2 decreased food intake, while co-administration of rapamycin, whole-body deletion of S6K1, or deletion of rptor in POMC neurons impeded the anorectic action of H2O2. H2O2 also increased oxidant levels in POMC neurons, an effect that hinged on functional mTORC1 in these neurons. Finally, scavenging ROS prevented the hypophagic action of leptin, which in turn required mTORC1 to increase oxidant levels in POMC neurons and to inhibit food intake. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that ROS and leptin require mTORC1 pathway activity in POMC neurons to increase oxidant levels in POMC neurons and consequently decrease food intake.





13/03/2018 | Brain Behav Immun   IF 6.3
mTORC1 pathway disruption abrogates the effects of the ciliary neurotrophic factor on energy balance and hypothalamic neuroinflammation.
Andre C, Catania C, Remus-Borel J, Ladeveze E, Leste-Lasserre T, Mazier W, Binder E, Gonzales D, Clark S, Guzman-Quevedo O, Abrous DN, Laye S, Cota D

Abstract:
Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) potently decreases food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese mice by acting through neuronal circuits and pathways located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus. CNTF also exerts pro-inflammatory actions within the brain. Here we tested whether CNTF modifies energy balance by inducing inflammatory responses in the ARC and whether these effects depend upon the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which regulates both energy metabolism and inflammation. To this purpose, chow- and high fat diet (HFD)- fed mice lacking the S6 kinase 1 (S6K1(-/-)), a downstream target of mTORC1, and their wild-type (WT) littermates received 12 days continuous intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of the CNTF analogue axokine (CNTFAx15). Behavioral, metabolic and molecular effects were evaluated. Central chronic administration of CNTFAx15 decreased body weight and feed efficiency in WT mice only, when fed HFD, but not chow. These metabolic effects correlated with increased number of iba-1 positive microglia specifically in the ARC and were accompanied by significant increases of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic iNOS and SOCS3 mRNA, molecular markers of pro-inflammatory response, were also increased by CNTFAx15. All these changes were absent in S6K1(-/-) mice. This study reveals that CNTFAx15 requires a functional S6K1 to modulate energy balance and hypothalamic inflammation in a diet-dependent fashion. Further investigations should determine whether S6K1 is a suitable target for the treatment of pathologies characterized by a high neuroinflammatory state.





06/03/2018 | Cell Rep   IF 8
Transcriptional Dysregulation in Postnatal Glutamatergic Progenitors Contributes to Closure of the Cortical Neurogenic Period.
Donega V, Marcy G, Lo Giudice Q, Zweifel S, Angonin D, Fiorelli R, Abrous DN, Rival-Gervier S, Koehl M, Jabaudon D, Raineteau O

Abstract:
Progenitors of cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu progenitors) are usually thought to switch fate before birth to produce astrocytes. We used fate-mapping approaches to show that a large fraction of Glu progenitors persist in the postnatal forebrain after closure of the cortical neurogenesis period. Postnatal Glu progenitors do not accumulate during embryonal development but are produced by embryonal radial glial cells that persist after birth in the dorsal subventricular zone and continue to give rise to cortical neurons, although with low efficiency. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals a dysregulation of transcriptional programs, which parallels changes in m(6)A methylation and correlates with the gradual decline in cortical neurogenesis observed in vivo. Rescuing experiments show that postnatal progenitors are partially permissive to genetic and pharmacological manipulations. Our study provides an in-depth characterization of postnatal Glu progenitors and identifies potential therapeutic targets for promoting brain repair.





05/03/2018 | Nat Neurosci   IF 19.9
Nontoxic, double-deletion-mutant rabies viral vectors for retrograde targeting of projection neurons.
Chatterjee S, Sullivan HA, MacLennan BJ, Xu R, Hou Y, Lavin TK, Lea NE, Michalski JE, Babcock KR, Dietrich S, Matthews GA, Beyeler A, Calhoon GG, Glober G, Whitesell JD, Yao S, Cetin A, Harris JA, Zeng H, Tye KM, Reid RC, Wickersham IR

Abstract:
Recombinant rabies viral vectors have proven useful for applications including retrograde targeting of projection neurons and monosynaptic tracing, but their cytotoxicity has limited their use to short-term experiments. Here we introduce a new class of double-deletion-mutant rabies viral vectors that left transduced cells alive and healthy indefinitely. Deletion of the viral polymerase gene abolished cytotoxicity and reduced transgene expression to trace levels but left vectors still able to retrogradely infect projection neurons and express recombinases, allowing downstream expression of other transgene products such as fluorophores and calcium indicators. The morphology of retrogradely targeted cells appeared unperturbed at 1 year postinjection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings showed no physiological abnormalities at 8 weeks. Longitudinal two-photon structural and functional imaging in vivo, tracking thousands of individual neurons for up to 4 months, showed that transduced neurons did not die but retained stable visual response properties even at the longest time points imaged.





05/03/2018 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 11.6
Depleting adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis increases cocaine-seeking behavior.
Deroche-Gamonet V, Revest JM, Fiancette JF, Balado E, Koehl M, Grosjean N, Abrous DN, Piazza PV

Abstract:
The hippocampus is the main locus for adult dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis. A number of studies have shown that aberrant DG neurogenesis correlates with many neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. Although clear causal relationships have been established between DG neurogenesis and memory dysfunction or mood-related disorders, evidence of the causal role of DG neurogenesis in drug-seeking behaviors has not been established. Here we assessed the role of new DG neurons in cocaine self-administration using an inducible transgenic approach that selectively depletes adult DG neurogenesis. Our results show that transgenic mice with decreased adult DG neurogenesis exhibit increased motivation to self-administer cocaine and a higher seeking response to cocaine-related cues. These results identify adult hippocampal neurogenesis as a key factor in vulnerability to cocaine addiction.





02/03/2018 | Sci Rep   IF 4.1
Metabolic Reprogramming in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.
Szelechowski M, Amoedo N, Obre E, Leger C, Allard L, Bonneu M, Claverol S, Lacombe D, Oliet S, Chevallier S, Le Masson G, Rossignol R

Abstract:
Mitochondrial dysfunction in the spinal cord is a hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the neurometabolic alterations during early stages of the disease remain unknown. Here, we investigated the bioenergetic and proteomic changes in ALS mouse motor neurons and patients' skin fibroblasts. We first observed that SODG93A mice presymptomatic motor neurons display alterations in the coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation, along with fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. The proteome of presymptomatic ALS mice motor neurons also revealed a peculiar metabolic signature with upregulation of most energy-transducing enzymes, including the fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and the ketogenic components HADHA and ACAT2, respectively. Accordingly, FAO inhibition altered cell viability specifically in ALS mice motor neurons, while uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) inhibition recovered cellular ATP levels and mitochondrial network morphology. These findings suggest a novel hypothesis of ALS bioenergetics linking FAO and UCP2. Lastly, we provide a unique set of data comparing the molecular alterations found in human ALS patients' skin fibroblasts and SODG93A mouse motor neurons, revealing conserved changes in protein translation, folding and assembly, tRNA aminoacylation and cell adhesion processes.





Abstract:
Tobacco use leads to 6 million deaths every year due to severe long-lasting diseases. The main component of tobacco, nicotine, is recognized as one of the most addictive drugs, making smoking cessation difficult, even when 70 percent of smokers wish to do so. Clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated consistently that nicotine seeking is a complex behavior involving various psychopharmacological mechanisms. Evidence supports that the population of smokers is heterogeneous, particularly as regards the breadth of motives that determine the urge to smoke. Here, we review converging psychological, genetic and neurobiological data from clinical and preclinical studies supporting that the mechanisms controlling nicotine seeking may vary from individual to individual. It appears timely that basic neuroscience integrates this heterogeneity to refine our understanding of the neurobiology of nicotine seeking, as tremendous progress has been made in modeling the various psychopharmacological mechanisms driving nicotine seeking in rodents. For a better understanding of the mechanisms that drive nicotine seeking, we emphasize the need for individual-based research strategies in which nicotine seeking, and eventually treatment efficacy, are determined while taking into account individual variations in the mechanisms of nicotine seeking.





26/02/2018 | Glia   IF 5.8
Localization of the cannabinoid type-1 receptor in subcellular astrocyte compartments of mutant mouse hippocampus.
Gutierrez-Rodriguez A, Bonilla-Del Rio I, Puente N, Gomez-Urquijo SM, Fontaine CJ, Egana-Huguet J, Elezgarai I, Ruehle S, Lutz B, Robin LM, Soria-Gomez E, Bellocchio L, Padwal JD, van der Stelt M, Mendizabal-Zubiaga J, Reguero L, Ramos A, Gerrikagoitia I, Marsicano G, Grandes P

Abstract:
Astroglial type-1 cannabinoid (CB1 ) receptors are involved in synaptic transmission, plasticity and behavior by interfering with the so-called tripartite synapse formed by pre- and post-synaptic neuronal elements and surrounding astrocyte processes. However, little is known concerning the subcellular distribution of astroglial CB1 receptors. In particular, brain CB1 receptors are mostly localized at cells' plasmalemma, but recent evidence indicates their functional presence in mitochondrial membranes. Whether CB1 receptors are present in astroglial mitochondria has remained unknown. To investigate this issue, we included conditional knock-out mice lacking astroglial CB1 receptor expression specifically in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-containing astrocytes (GFAP-CB1 -KO mice) and also generated genetic rescue mice to re-express CB1 receptors exclusively in astrocytes (GFAP-CB1 -RS). To better identify astroglial structures by immunoelectron microscopy, global CB1 knock-out (CB1 -KO) mice and wild-type (CB1 -WT) littermates were intra-hippocampally injected with an adeno-associated virus expressing humanized renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) under the control of human GFAP promoter to generate GFAPhrGFP-CB1 -KO and -WT mice, respectively. Furthermore, double immunogold (for CB1 ) and immunoperoxidase (for GFAP or hrGFP) revealed that CB1 receptors are present in astroglial mitochondria from different hippocampal regions of CB1 -WT, GFAP-CB1 -RS and GFAPhrGFP-CB1 -WT mice. Only non-specific gold particles were detected in mouse hippocampi lacking CB1 receptors. Altogether, we demonstrated the existence of a precise molecular architecture of the CB1 receptor in astrocytes that will have to be taken into account in evaluating the functional activity of cannabinergic signaling at the tripartite synapse.





30/01/2018 | Neuroimage   IF 5.4
Deciphering the microstructure of hippocampal subfields with in vivo DTI and NODDI: Applications to experimental multiple sclerosis.
Crombe A, Planche V, Raffard G, Bourel J, Dubourdieu N, Panatier A, Fukutomi H, Dousset V, Oliet S, Hiba B, Tourdias T

Abstract:
The hippocampus contains distinct populations of neurons organized into separate anatomical subfields and layers with differential vulnerability to pathological mechanisms. The ability of in vivo neuroimaging to pinpoint regional vulnerability is especially important for better understanding of hippocampal pathology at the early stage of neurodegenerative disorders and for monitoring future therapeutic strategies. This is the case for instance in multiple sclerosis whose neurodegenerative component can affect the hippocampus from the early stage. We challenged the capacity of two models, i.e. the classical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) model and the neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) model, to compute quantitative diffusion MRI that could capture microstructural alterations in the individual hippocampal layers of experimental-autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, the animal model of multiple sclerosis. To achieve this, the hippocampal anatomy of a healthy mouse brain was first explored ex vivo with high resolution DTI and NODDI. Then, 18 EAE mice and 18 control mice were explored 20 days after immunization with in vivo diffusion MRI prior to sacrifice for the histological quantification of neurites and glial markers in each hippocampal layer. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps were computed from the DTI model while the orientation dispersion index (ODI), the neurite density index (NDI) and the volume fraction of isotropic diffusivity (isoVF) maps were computed from the NODDI model. We first showed in control mice that color-coded FA and ODI maps can delineate three main hippocampal layers. The quantification of FA, AD, RD, MD, ODI, NDI and isoVF presented differences within these 3 layers, especially within the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus which displayed a specific signature based on a combination of AD (or MD), ODI and NDI. Then, the comparison between EAE and control mice showed a decrease of AD (p=0.036) and of MD (p=0.033) selectively within the molecular layer of EAE mice while NODDI indices did not present any difference between EAE and control mice in any layer. Histological analyses confirmed the differential vulnerability of the molecular layer of EAE mice that exhibited decreased dendritic length and decreased dendritic complexity together with activated microglia. Dendritic length and intersections within the molecular layer were independent contributors to the observed decrease of AD (R(2)=0.37 and R(2)=0.40, p<0.0001) and MD (R(2)=0.41 and R(2)=0.42, p<0.0001). We therefore identified that NODDI maps can help to highlight the internal microanatomy of the hippocampus but NODDI still presents limitations in grey matter as it failed to capture selective dendritic alterations occurring at early stages of a neurodegenerative disease such as multiple sclerosis, whereas DTI maps were significantly altered.





24/01/2018 | Neuron   IF 14.3
Prefrontal-Periaqueductal Gray-Projecting Neurons Mediate Context Fear Discrimination.
Rozeske RR, Jercog D, Karalis N, Chaudun F, Khoder S, Girard D, Winke N, Herry C

Abstract:
Survival critically depends on selecting appropriate defensive or exploratory behaviors and is strongly influenced by the surrounding environment. Contextual discrimination is a fundamental process that is thought to depend on the prefrontal cortex to integrate sensory information from the environment and regulate adaptive responses to threat during uncertainty. However, the precise prefrontal circuits necessary for discriminating a previously threatening context from a neutral context remain unknown. Using a combination of single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations, we identified a neuronal subpopulation in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) that projects to the lateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (l/vlPAG) and is selectively activated during contextual fear discrimination. Moreover, optogenetic activation and inhibition of this neuronal population promoted contextual fear discrimination and generalization, respectively. Our results identify a subpopulation of dmPFC-l/vlPAG-projecting neurons that control switching between different emotional states during contextual discrimination.





23/01/2018 | Cell Rep   IF 8
Organization of Valence-Encoding and Projection-Defined Neurons in the Basolateral Amygdala.
Beyeler A, Chang CJ, Silvestre M, Leveque C, Namburi P, Wildes CP, Tye KM

Abstract:
The basolateral amygdala (BLA) mediates associative learning for both fear and reward. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that different BLA projections distinctly alter motivated behavior, including projections to the nucleus accumbens (NAc), medial aspect of the central amygdala (CeM), and ventral hippocampus (vHPC). Although there is consensus regarding the existence of distinct subsets of BLA neurons encoding positive or negative valence, controversy remains regarding the anatomical arrangement of these populations. First, we map the location of more than 1,000 neurons distributed across the BLA and recorded during a Pavlovian discrimination task. Next, we determine the location of projection-defined neurons labeled with retrograde tracers and use CLARITY to reveal the axonal path in 3-dimensional space. Finally, we examine the local influence of each projection-defined populations within the BLA. Understanding the functional and topographical organization of circuits underlying valence assignment could reveal fundamental principles about emotional processing.





2018 | front pharmacol   IF 3.8
NPV-BSK805, an Antineoplastic Jak2 Inhibitor Effective in Myeloproliferative Disorders, Causes Adiposity in Mice by Interfering With the Action of Leptin.
Haissaguerre M, Ferriere A, Clark S, Guzman-Quevedo O, Tabarin A, Cota D

Abstract:
The pathophysiology of body weight gain that is observed in patients suffering from myeloproliferative neoplasms treated with inhibitors of the janus kinase (Jak) 1 and 2 pathway remains unknown. Here we hypothesized that this class of drugs interferes with the metabolic actions of leptin, as this hormone requires functional Jak2 signaling. To test this, C57BL/6J chow-fed mice received either chronic intraperitoneal (ip) or repeated intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of the selective Jak2 inhibitor NVP-BSK805, which was proven efficacious in treating polycythemia in rodents. Changes in food intake, body weight and body composition were recorded. Icv NVP-BSK805 was combined with ip leptin to evaluate ability to interfere with the action of this hormone on food intake and on induction of hypothalamic phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). We found that chronic peripheral administration of NVP-BSK805 did not alter food intake, but increased fat mass and feed efficiency. The increase in fat mass was more pronounced during repeated icv administration of the compound, suggesting that metabolic effects were related to molecular interference in brain structures regulating energy balance. Accordingly, acute icv administration of NVP-BSK805 prevented the ability of leptin to decrease food intake and body weight by impeding STAT3 phosphorylation within the hypothalamus. Consequently, acute icv administration of NVP-BSK805 at higher dose induced hyperphagia and body weight gain. Our results provide evidence for a specific anabolic effect exerted by antineoplastic drugs targeting the Jak2 pathway, which is due to interference with the actions of leptin. Consequently, assessment of metabolic variables related to increased fat mass gain should be performed in patients treated with Jak2 inhibitors.





2018 | Methods Mol Biol
Stool DNA Integrity Method for Colorectal Cancer Detection.
Rengucci C, De Maio G, Menghi M, Calistri D

Abstract:
Fluorescence long DNA (FL-DNA) is a non-invasive and simple-to-perform stool DNA test. This assay consists of a qualitative and quantitative real-time PCR (RT PCR) analysis. FL-DNA has great potential in colorectal cancer (CRC) lesions detection used alone or in combination with the standard CRC screening tool: immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT).





24/11/2017 | cell cycle   IF 3.5
Regulation of RNA polymerase III transcription during transformation of human IMR90 fibroblasts with defined genetic elements.
Durrieu-Gaillard S, Dumay-Odelot H, Boldina G, Tourasse NJ, Allard D, Andre F, Macari F, Choquet A, Lagarde P, Drutel G, Leste-Lasserre T, Petitet M, Lesluyes T, Lartigue-Faustin L, Dupuy JW, Chibon F, Roeder RG, Joubert D, Vagner S, Teichmann M

Abstract:
RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that are essential for cellular homeostasis and growth. Its activity is regulated by inactivation of tumor suppressor proteins and overexpression of the oncogene c-MYC, but the concerted action of these tumor-promoting factors on Pol III transcription has not yet been assessed. In order to comprehensively analyse the regulation of Pol III transcription during tumorigenesis we employ a model system that relies on the expression of five genetic elements to achieve cellular transformation. Expression of these elements in six distinct transformation intermediate cell lines leads to the inactivation of TP53, RB1, and protein phosphatase 2A, as well as the activation of RAS and the protection of telomeres by TERT, thereby conducting to full tumoral transformation of IMR90 fibroblasts. Transformation is accompanied by moderately enhanced levels of a subset of Pol III-transcribed RNAs (7SK; MRP; H1). In addition, mRNA and/or protein levels of several Pol III subunits and transcription factors are upregulated, including increased protein levels of TFIIIB and TFIIIC subunits, of SNAPC1 and of Pol III subunits. Strikingly, the expression of POLR3G and of SNAPC1 is strongly enhanced during transformation in this cellular transformation model. Collectively, our data indicate that increased expression of several components of the Pol III transcription system accompanied by a 2-fold increase in steady state levels of a subset of Pol III RNAs is sufficient for sustaining tumor formation.





22/11/2017 | Psychopharmacology (Berl)   IF 3.3
Synergistic enhancing-memory effect of donepezil and S 47445, an AMPA positive allosteric modulator, in middle-aged and aged mice.
Bretin S, Krazem A, Henkous N, Froger-Colleaux C, Mocaer E, Louis C, Perdaems N, Marighetto A, Beracochea D

Abstract:
Positive allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors (AMPA-PAMs) are described to facilitate cognitive processes in different memory-based models. Among them, S 47445 is a novel potent and selective AMPA-PAM. In order to assess its efficacy after repeated administration, S 47445 effect was evaluated in two aging-induced memory dysfunction tasks in old mice, one short-term working memory model evaluated in a radial maze task and one assessing contextual memory performance. S 47445 was shown to improve cognition in both models sensitive to aging. In fact, administration of S 47445 at 0.3 mg/kg (s.c.) reversed the age-induced deficits of the working memory model whatever the retention interval. Moreover, in the contextual task, S 47445 also reversed the age-induced deficit at all tested doses (from 0.03 to 0.3 mg/kg, p.o.). Since donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, induces only moderate symptomatic effects on memory in Alzheimer's disease patients, an alternative strategy for treatment of cognitive symptoms could be to act simultaneously on both glutamatergic AMPA receptors and cholinergic pathways by combining pharmacological treatments. The present study further examined such effects by assessing combinations of S 47445 and donepezil given orally during 9 days in aged C57/Bl6J mice using contextual memory task (CSD) and the working memory model of serial alternation task (AT). Interestingly, a significant synergistic memory-enhancing effect was observed with the combination of donepezil at 0.1 mg/kg with S 47445 at 0.1 mg/kg p.o. in the CSD or with S 47445 at 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg in AT in comparison to compounds given alone and without any pharmacokinetic interaction.





20/11/2017 | hepatology   IF 13.2
New insights into diagnosis and therapeutic options for proliferative hepatoblastoma.
Hooks KB, Audoux J, Fazli H, Lesjean S, Ernault T, Senant ND, Leste-Lasserre T, Hagedorn M, Rousseau B, Danet C, Branchereau S, Brugieres L, Taque S, Guettier C, Fabre M, Rullier A, Buendia MA, Commes T, Grosset CF, Raymond AA

Abstract:
Surgery and cisplatin-based treatment of hepatoblastoma (HB) currently guarantee the survival of 70-80% of patients. However, some important challenges remain in diagnosing high risk tumors and identifying relevant targetable pathways offering new therapeutic avenues. Previously, two molecular subclasses of hepatoblastoma tumors have been described, namely C1 and C2; C2 being the subgroup with the poorest prognosis, a more advanced tumor stage and the worst overall survival rate. An associated 16-gene signature to discriminate the two tumoral subgroups was proposed but it has not been transferred into clinical routine. To address these issues we performed RNA sequencing of 25 tumors and matched normal liver samples from patients. The transcript profiling separated HB into three distinct subgroups named C1, C2A and C2B, identifiable by a concise four-gene signature: HSD17B6, ITGA6, TOP2A and VIM, with TOP2A being characteristic for the proliferative C2A tumors. Differential expression of these genes was confirmed by RT-qPCR on an expanded cohort and by immunohistochemistry. We also revealed significant overexpression of genes involved in Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway in the C2A subgroup. We then investigated the ability of several described FA inhibitors to block growth of HB cells in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that bortezomib, an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, strongly impairs the proliferation and survival of HB cell lines in vitro, blocks FA pathway associated double-strand DNA repair and significantly impedes HB growth in vivo. In conclusion, the highly proliferating C2A subtype is characterized by TOP2A gene up-regulation and FA pathway activation and HB therapeutic arsenal could include Bortezomib for the treatment of patients with the most aggressive tumors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.





01/11/2017 | J Clin Invest   IF 12.8
Adipocyte cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates energy homeostasis and alternatively activated macrophages.
Ruiz de Azua I, Mancini G, Srivastava RK, Rey AA, Cardinal P, Tedesco L, Zingaretti CM, Sassmann A, Quarta C, Schwitter C, Conrad A, Wettschureck N, Vemuri VK, Makriyannis A, Hartwig J, Mendez-Lago M, Bindila L, Monory K, Giordano A, Cinti S, Marsicano G, Offermanns S, Nisoli E, Pagotto U, Cota D, Lutz B

Abstract:
Dysregulated adipocyte physiology leads to imbalanced energy storage, obesity, and associated diseases, imposing a costly burden on current health care. Cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) plays a crucial role in controlling energy metabolism through central and peripheral mechanisms. In this work, adipocyte-specific inducible deletion of the CB1 gene (Ati-CB1-KO) was sufficient to protect adult mice from diet-induced obesity and associated metabolic alterations and to reverse the phenotype in already obese mice. Compared with controls, Ati-CB1-KO mice showed decreased body weight, reduced total adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, enhanced energy expenditure, and fat depot-specific cellular remodeling toward lowered energy storage capacity and browning of white adipocytes. These changes were associated with an increase in alternatively activated macrophages concomitant with enhanced sympathetic tone in adipose tissue. Remarkably, these alterations preceded the appearance of differences in body weight, highlighting the causal relation between the loss of CB1 and the triggering of metabolic reprogramming in adipose tissues. Finally, the lean phenotype of Ati-CB1-KO mice and the increase in alternatively activated macrophages in adipose tissue were also present at thermoneutral conditions. Our data provide compelling evidence for a crosstalk among adipocytes, immune cells, and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), wherein CB1 plays a key regulatory role.





11/2017 | Nat Neurosci   IF 17.8
Synapse-specific astrocyte gating of amygdala-related behavior.
Martin-Fernandez M, Jamison S, Robin LM, Zhao Z, Martin ED, Aguilar J, Benneyworth MA, Marsicano G, Araque A

Abstract:
The amygdala plays key roles in fear and anxiety. Studies of the amygdala have largely focused on neuronal function and connectivity. Astrocytes functionally interact with neurons, but their role in the amygdala remains largely unknown. We show that astrocytes in the medial subdivision of the central amygdala (CeM) determine the synaptic and behavioral outputs of amygdala circuits. To investigate the role of astrocytes in amygdala-related behavior and identify the underlying synaptic mechanisms, we used exogenous or endogenous signaling to selectively activate CeM astrocytes. Astrocytes depressed excitatory synapses from basolateral amygdala via A1 adenosine receptor activation and enhanced inhibitory synapses from the lateral subdivision of the central amygdala via A2A receptor activation. Furthermore, astrocytic activation decreased the firing rate of CeM neurons and reduced fear expression in a fear-conditioning paradigm. Therefore, we conclude that astrocyte activity determines fear responses by selectively regulating specific synapses, which indicates that animal behavior results from the coordinated activity of neurons and astrocytes.





11/2017 | Cell Calcium   IF 3.7
Dynamics of surface neurotransmitter receptors and transporters in glial cells: Single molecule insights.
Ciappelloni S, Murphy-Royal C, Dupuis JP, Oliet SHR, Groc L

Abstract:
The surface dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters, as well as ion channels, has been well-documented in neurons, revealing complex molecular behaviour and key physiological functions. However, our understanding of the membrane trafficking and dynamics of the signalling molecules located at the plasma membrane of glial cells is still in its infancy. Yet, recent breakthroughs in the field of glial cells have been obtained using combination of superresolution microscopy, single molecule imaging, and electrophysiological recordings. Here, we review our current knowledge on the surface dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors, transporters and ion channels, in glial cells. It has emerged that the brain cell network activity, synaptic activity, and calcium signalling, regulate the surface distribution and dynamics of these molecules. Remarkably, the dynamics of a given neurotransmitter receptor/transporter at the plasma membrane of a glial cell or neuron is unique, revealing the existence of cell-type specific regulatory pathways. Thus, investigating the dynamics of signalling proteins at the surface of glial cells will likely shed new light on our understanding of glial cell physiology and pathology.





31/10/2017 | Cereb Cortex   IF 6.6
Pathway-Specific Control of Striatal Neuron Vulnerability by Corticostriatal Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors.
Ruiz-Calvo A, Maroto IB, Bajo-Graneras R, Chiarlone A, Gaudioso A, Ferrero JJ, Resel E, Sanchez-Prieto J, Rodriguez-Navarro JA, Marsicano G, Galve-Roperh I, Bellocchio L, Guzman M

Abstract:
The vast majority of neurons within the striatum are GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which receive glutamatergic input from the cortex and thalamus, and form two major efferent pathways: the direct pathway, expressing dopamine D1 receptor (D1R-MSNs), and the indirect pathway, expressing dopamine D2 receptor (D2R-MSNs). While molecular mechanisms of MSN degeneration have been identified in animal models of striatal damage, the molecular factors that dictate a selective vulnerability of D1R-MSNs or D2R-MSNs remain unknown. Here, we combined genetic, chemogenetic, and pharmacological strategies with behavioral and neurochemical analyses, and show that the pool of cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) located on corticostriatal terminals efficiently safeguards D1R-MSNs, but not D2R-MSNs, from different insults. This cell-specific response relies on the regulation of glutamatergic signaling, and is independent from the CB1R-dependent control of astroglial activity in the striatum. These findings define cortical CB1R as a pivotal synaptic player in dictating a differential vulnerability of D1R-MSNs versus D2R-MSNs, and increase our understanding of the role of coordinated cannabinergic-glutamatergic signaling in establishing corticostriatal circuits and its dysregulation in neurodegenerative diseases.





26/10/2017 | Gut   IF 16.7
Liver Reptin/RUVBL2 controls glucose and lipid metabolism with opposite actions on mTORC1 and mTORC2 signalling.
Javary J, Allain-Courtois N, Saucisse N, Costet P, Heraud C, Benhamed F, Pierre R, Bure C, Pallares-Lupon N, Do Cruzeiro M, Postic C, Cota D, Dubus P, Rosenbaum J, Benhamouche-Trouillet S

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: The AAA+ ATPase Reptin is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and preclinical studies indicate that it could be a relevant therapeutic target. However, its physiological and pathophysiological roles in vivo remain unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of Reptin in mammalian adult liver. DESIGN AND RESULTS: We generated an inducible liver-specific Reptin knockout (RepinLKO ) mouse model. Following Reptin invalidation, mice displayed decreased body and fat mass, hypoglycaemia and hypolipidaemia. This was associated with decreased hepatic mTOR protein abundance. Further experiments in primary hepatocytes demonstrated that Reptin maintains mTOR protein level through its ATPase activity. Unexpectedly, loss or inhibition of Reptin induced an opposite effect on mTORC1 and mTORC2 signalling, with: (1) strong inhibition of hepatic mTORC1 activity, likely responsible for the reduction of hepatocytes cell size, for decreased de novo lipogenesis and cholesterol transcriptional programmes and (2) enhancement of mTORC2 activity associated with inhibition of the gluconeogenesis transcriptional programme and hepatic glucose production. Consequently, the role of hepatic Reptin in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease consecutive to a high-fat diet was investigated. We found that Reptin deletion completely rescued pathological phenotypes associated with IR, including glucose intolerance, hyperglycaemia, hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis. CONCLUSION: We show here that the AAA +ATPase Reptin is a regulator of mTOR signalling in the liver and global glucido-lipidic homeostasis. Inhibition of hepatic Reptin expression or activity represents a new therapeutic perspective for metabolic syndrome.





24/10/2017 | Nat Commun   IF 12.1
Altered surface mGluR5 dynamics provoke synaptic NMDAR dysfunction and cognitive defects in Fmr1 knockout mice.
Aloisi E, Le Corf K, Dupuis J, Zhang P, Ginger M, Labrousse V, Spatuzza M, Georg Haberl M, Costa L, Shigemoto R, Tappe-Theodor A, Drago F, Vincenzo Piazza P, Mulle C, Groc L, Ciranna L, Catania MV, Frick A

Abstract:
Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is crucially implicated in the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS); however, its dysfunction at the sub-cellular level, and related synaptic and cognitive phenotypes are unexplored. Here, we probed the consequences of mGluR5/Homer scaffold disruption for mGluR5 cell-surface mobility, synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function, and behavioral phenotypes in the second-generation Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse. Using single-molecule tracking, we found that mGluR5 was significantly more mobile at synapses in hippocampal Fmr1 KO neurons, causing an increased synaptic surface co-clustering of mGluR5 and NMDAR. This correlated with a reduced amplitude of synaptic NMDAR currents, a lack of their mGluR5-activated long-term depression, and NMDAR/hippocampus dependent cognitive deficits. These synaptic and behavioral phenomena were reversed by knocking down Homer1a in Fmr1 KO mice. Our study provides a mechanistic link between changes of mGluR5 dynamics and pathological phenotypes of FXS, unveiling novel targets for mGluR5-based therapeutics.







19/09/2017 | Cell Metab   IF 18.2
Molecular Integration of Incretin and Glucocorticoid Action Reverses Immunometabolic Dysfunction and Obesity.
Quarta C, Clemmensen C, Zhu Z, Yang B, Joseph SS, Lutter D, Yi CX, Graf E, Garcia-Caceres C, Legutko B, Fischer K, Brommage R, Zizzari P, Franklin BS, Krueger M, Koch M, Vettorazzi S, Li P, Hofmann SM, Bakhti M, Bastidas-Ponce A, Lickert H, Strom TM, Gailus-Durner V, Bechmann I, Perez-Tilve D, Tuckermann J, Hrabe de Angelis M, Sandoval D, Cota D, Latz E, Seeley RJ, Muller TD, DiMarchi RD, Finan B, Tschop MH

Abstract:
Chronic inflammation has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of diet-induced obesity. However, scarce therapeutic options are available to treat obesity and the associated immunometabolic complications. Glucocorticoids are routinely employed for the management of inflammatory diseases, but their pleiotropic nature leads to detrimental metabolic side effects. We developed a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-dexamethasone co-agonist in which GLP-1 selectively delivers dexamethasone to GLP-1 receptor-expressing cells. GLP-1-dexamethasone lowers body weight up to 25% in obese mice by targeting the hypothalamic control of feeding and by increasing energy expenditure. This strategy reverses hypothalamic and systemic inflammation while improving glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The selective preference for GLP-1 receptor bypasses deleterious effects of dexamethasone on glucose handling, bone integrity, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Thus, GLP-1-directed glucocorticoid pharmacology represents a safe and efficacious therapy option for diet-induced immunometabolic derangements and the resulting obesity.





19/09/2017 | Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A   IF 9.7
Temporal binding function of dorsal CA1 is critical for declarative memory formation.
Sellami A, Al Abed AS, Brayda-Bruno L, Etchamendy N, Valerio S, Oule M, Pantaleon L, Lamothe V, Potier M, Bernard K, Jabourian M, Herry C, Mons N, Piazza PV, Eichenbaum H, Marighetto A

Abstract:
Temporal binding, the process that enables association between discontiguous stimuli in memory, and relational organization, a process that enables the flexibility of declarative memories, are both hippocampus-dependent and decline in aging. However, how these two processes are related in supporting declarative memory formation and how they are compromised in age-related memory loss remain hypothetical. We here identify a causal link between these two features of declarative memory: Temporal binding is a necessary condition for the relational organization of discontiguous events. We demonstrate that the formation of a relational memory is limited by the capability of temporal binding, which depends on dorsal (d)CA1 activity over time intervals and diminishes in aging. Conversely, relational representation is successful even in aged individuals when the demand on temporal binding is minimized, showing that relational/declarative memory per se is not impaired in aging. Thus, bridging temporal intervals by dCA1 activity is a critical foundation of relational representation, and a deterioration of this mechanism is responsible for the age-associated memory impairment.





08/09/2017 | Sci Rep   IF 4.3
Spinal miRNA-124 regulates synaptopodin and nociception in an animal model of bone cancer pain.
Elramah S, Lopez-Gonzalez MJ, Bastide M, Dixmerias F, Roca-Lapirot O, Wielanek-Bachelet AC, Vital A, Leste-Lasserre T, Brochard A, Landry M, Favereaux A

Abstract:
Strong breakthrough pain is one of the most disabling symptoms of cancer since it affects up to 90% of cancer patients and is often refractory to treatments. Alteration in gene expression is a known mechanism of cancer pain in which microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs, play a crucial role. Here, in a mouse model of cancer pain, we show that miR-124 is down-regulated in the spinal cord, the first relay of the pain signal to the brain. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that miR-124 is an endogenous and specific inhibitor of synaptopodin (Synpo), a key protein for synaptic transmission. In addition, we demonstrate that Synpo is a key component of the nociceptive pathways. Interestingly, miR-124 was down-regulated in the spinal cord in cancer pain conditions, leading to an up-regulation of Synpo. Furthermore, intrathecal injections of miR-124 mimics in cancerous mice normalized Synpo expression and completely alleviated cancer pain in the early phase of the cancer. Finally, miR-124 was also down-regulated in the cerebrospinal fluid of cancer patients who developed pain, suggesting that miR-124 could be an efficient analgesic drug to treat cancer pain patients.





01/09/2017 | Neuropsychopharmacology   IF 6.4
CB1 Receptors Signaling in the Brain: Extracting Specificity from Ubiquity.
Busquets-Garcia A, Bains J, Marsicano G

Abstract:
Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are amongst the most ubiquitous signaling molecules in the nervous system. Over the past few decades, observations based on a large volume of work, first examining the pharmacological effects of exogenous cannabinoids, and then the physiological functions of eCBs, have directly challenged long-held and dogmatic views about communication, plasticity and behavior in the Central Nervous System (CNS). The eCBs and their cognate cannabinoid receptors exhibit a number of unique properties that distinguish them from the widely studied classical amino acid transmitters, neuropeptides and catecholamines. Although we now have a loose set of mechanistic rules based on experimental findings, new studies continue to reveal that our understanding of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is continuously evolving and challenging long-held conventions. Here, we will briefly summarize findings on the current canonical view of the 'endocannabinoid system' and will address novel aspects that reveal how a nearly ubiquitous system can determine highly specific functions in the brain. In particular, we will focus on findings that push for an expansion of our ideas around long-held beliefs about eCB signaling that, whilst clearly true, may be contributing to an oversimplified perspective on how cannabinoid signaling at the microscopic level impacts behavior at the macroscopic level.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 01 September 2017. doi:10.1038/npp.2017.206.





09/2017 | anal bioanal chem   IF 3.4
Derivatization-free LC-MS/MS method for estrogen quantification in mouse brain highlights a local metabolic regulation after oral versus subcutaneous administration.
Lozan E, Shinkaruk S, Al Abed SA, Lamothe V, Potier M, Marighetto A, Schmitter JM, Bennetau-Pelissero C, Bure C

Abstract:
17beta-Estradiol (17beta-E2) is a steroid with pleiotropic actions. In addition to being a sexual hormone, it is also produced in the brain where it modulates the reproductive axis. It has been shown that 17beta-E2 also acts on synaptic plasticity and plays a role in neurological pathways and in neurodegenerative diseases. Assaying this steroid in the brain is thus interesting to improve our knowledge of 17beta-E2 effects in the brain. However, 17beta-E2 concentration in the central nervous system has been reported to be of a few nanograms per gram wet weight (nanomolar range concentration); therefore, its quantification requires both an efficient extraction process and a sensitive detection method. Herein is presented a derivatization-free procedure based on solid-phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis, targeted on 17beta-E2, its isomer17alpha-E2, and its metabolites estrone (E1) and estriol (E3). This extraction process allowed reaching 96% 17beta-E2 recovery from the mouse brain. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values of 0.5 and 2.5 pmol mL(-1), respectively, were reached for both 17alpha-E2 and 17beta-E2. LOD values for E1 and E3 were 0.01 and 0.025 pmol mL(-1), respectively. The variation coefficients for intra- and inter-assays were 6 and 14%, respectively, for both estradiol forms. The method was applied to assess estrogen levels in the mouse brain and hippocampus after 17beta-E2 acute (subcutaneous injection) and chronic (drinking water) physiological administration. Total estrogen levels were determined after enzymatic deconjugation and compared to free estrogen levels. While 17alpha-E2 was not detected in biological samples, 17beta-E2 and metabolite measurements highlight a local biotransformation of estrogens after physiological administration via drinking water. Graphical abstract Method workflow: After oral or subcutaneous Estradiol administration, mouse brain or hippocampus was removed. Samples were homogenized and prepared according to a liquid-liquid extraction, followed by a solid-phase extraction. Then, LC-MS/MS was optimized to quantify 17ss-E2, its isomer17alpha-E2, its metabolites estrone (E1) and estriol (E3) and their conjugates.





Abstract:
Background: Orexins are hypothalamic neuropeptides recently involved in the regulation of emotional memory. The basolateral amygdala, an area orchestrating fear memory processes, appears to be modulated by orexin transmission during fear extinction. However, the neuronal types within the basolateral amygdala involved in this modulation remain to be elucidated. Methods: We used retrograde tracing combined with immunofluorescence techniques in mice to identify basolateral amygdala projection neurons and cell subpopulations in this brain region influenced by orexin transmission during contextual fear extinction consolidation. Results: Treatment with the orexin-1 receptor antagonist SB334867 increased the activity of basolateral amygdala neurons projecting to infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex during fear extinction. GABAergic interneurons expressing calbindin, but not parvalbumin, were also activated by orexin-1 receptor antagonism in the basolateral amygdala. Conclusions: These data identify neuronal circuits and cell populations of the amygdala associated with the facilitation of fear extinction consolidation induced by the orexin-1 receptor antagonist SB334867.





19/07/2017 | Neuropsychopharmacology   IF 6.4
Potential Involvement of Impaired BKCa Channel Function in Sensory Defensiveness and Some Behavioral Disturbances Induced by Unfamiliar Environment in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.
Carreno-Munoz MI, Martins F, Medrano MC, Aloisi E, Pietropaolo S, Dechaud C, Subashi E, Bony G, Ginger M, Moujahid A, Frick A, Leinekugel X

Abstract:
In fragile X syndrome (FXS), sensory hypersensitivity and impaired habituation is thought to result in attention overload and various behavioral abnormalities in reaction to the excessive and remanent salience of environment features that would normally be ignored. This phenomenon, termed sensory defensiveness, has been proposed as the potential cause of hyperactivity, hyperarousal, and negative reactions to changes in routine that are often deleterious for FXS patients. However, the lack of tools for manipulating sensory hypersensitivity has not allowed the experimental testing required to evaluate the relevance of this hypothesis. Recent work has shown that BMS-204352, a BKCa channel agonist, was efficient to reverse cortical hyperexcitability and related sensory hypersensitivity in the Fmr1-KO mouse model of FXS. In the present study, we report that exposing Fmr1-KO mice to novel or unfamiliar environments resulted in multiple behavioral perturbations, such as hyperactivity, impaired nest building and excessive grooming of the back. Reversing sensory hypersensitivity with the BKCa channel agonist BMS-204352 prevented these behavioral abnormalities in Fmr1-KO mice. These results are in support of the sensory defensiveness hypothesis, and confirm BKCa as a potentially relevant molecular target for the development of drug medication against FXS/ASD.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 16 August 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.149.





23/06/2017 | hepatology   IF 13.2
Argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1): A marker of unclassified hepatocellular adenoma and high bleeding risk.
Henriet E, Hammoud AA, Dupuy JW, Dartigues B, Ezzoukry Z, Dugot-Senant N, Leste-Lasserre T, Pallares-Lupon N, Nikolski M, Le Bail B, Blanc JF, Balabaud C, Bioulac-Sage P, Raymond AA, Saltel F

Abstract:
Hepatocellular adenomas (HCA) are rare benign tumors divided into three main subgroups defined by patho-molecular features, HNF1A (H-HCA), mutated beta-catenin (b-HCA) and inflammatory (IHCA). In the case of unclassified HCA (UHCA), which are currently identified by default, a high risk of bleeding remains a clinical issue. The objective of this study was to explore UHCA proteome with the aim to identify specific biomarkers. Following dissection of the tumoral (T) and non-tumoral (NT) tissue on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) from HCA tissue sections using laser capture methodology, we performed mass spectrometry analysis to compare T and NT protein expression levels in HCA, H-HCA, IHCA, b-HCA, UHCA and focal nodular hyperplasia. Using this methodology, we searched for proteins, which are specifically deregulated in UHCA. We demonstrate that proteomic profiles allow discriminating known HCA subtypes through the identification of classical biomarkers in each HCA subgroup. We observed specific upregulation of the arginine synthesis pathway associated with overexpression of argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) and arginosuccinate lyase (ASL) in UHCA. ASS1 immunohistochemistry identified all the UHCA, of which 64.7% presented clinical bleeding manifestations. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the significance of ASS1 was not restricted to UHCA but also encompassed certain hemorrhagic cases in other HCA subtypes, particularly inflammatory HCA. CONCLUSION: ASS1+ HCA combined with a typical hematoxylin and eosin stain aspect defined a new HCA subgroup at a high risk of bleeding. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.





20/06/2017 | bio protoc
Representation-mediated Aversion as a Model to Study Psychotic-like States in Mice.
Busquets-Garcia A, Soria-Gomez E, Ferreira G, Marsicano G

Abstract:
Several paradigms for rodent models of the cognitive and negative endophenotypes found in schizophrenic patients have been proposed. However, significant efforts are needed in order to study the pathophysiology of schizophrenia-related positive symptoms. Recently, it has been shown that these positive symptoms can be studied in rats by using representation-mediated learning. This learning measure the accuracy of mental representations of reality, also called 'reality testing'. Alterations in 'reality testing' performance can be an indication of an impairment in perception which is a clear hallmark of positive psychotic-like states. Thus, we describe here a mouse task adapted from previous findings based on a sensory preconditioning task. With this task, associations made between different neutral stimuli (e.g., an odor and a taste) and subsequent selective devaluation of one of these stimuli have allowed us to study mental sensory representations. Thus, the interest of this task is that it can be used to model positive psychotic-like states in mice, as recently described.





12/06/2017 | Trends Neurosci   IF 11.1
Astroglial versus Neuronal D-Serine: Fact Checking.
Papouin T, Henneberger C, Rusakov DA, Oliet SHR

Abstract:
The activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is conditioned by the binding of a co-agonist to a dedicated receptor binding site. It is now largely accepted that D-serine plays this role at many central synapses in the hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and in prefrontal, visual, and somatosensory cortices. D-Serine has been found to be synthesized, stored, and released by astrocytes (Figure 1). However, several immunolabeling studies and experiments in genetically modified animals have recently led to a suggestion that neurons are primarily responsible for the synthesis and release of D-serine [1]. Here we argue that such conclusions could have resulted from the erroneous interpretation of experimental data and that they are at odds with a substantial amount of published work.





09/06/2017 | eLife   IF 7.7
Co-agonists differentially tune GluN2B-NMDA receptor trafficking at hippocampal synapses.
Ferreira JS, Papouin T, Ladepeche L, Yao A, Langlais VC, Bouchet D, Dulong J, Mothet JP, Sacchi S, Pollegioni L, Paoletti P, Oliet SHR, Groc L

Abstract:
The subunit composition of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDAR), such as the relative content of GluN2A- and GluN2B-containing receptors, greatly influences the glutamate synaptic transmission. Receptor co-agonists, glycine and D-serine, have intriguingly emerged as potential regulators of the receptor trafficking in addition to their requirement for its activation. Using a combination of single-molecule imaging, biochemistry and electrophysiology, we show that glycine and D-serine relative availability at rat hippocampal glutamatergic synapses regulate the trafficking and synaptic content of NMDAR subtypes. Acute manipulations of co-agonist levels, both ex vivo and in vitro, unveil that D-serine alter the membrane dynamics and content of GluN2B-NMDAR, but not GluN2A-NMDAR, at synapses through a process requiring PDZ binding scaffold partners. In addition, using FRET-based FLIM approach, we demonstrate that D-serine rapidly induces a conformational change of the GluN1 subunit intracellular C-terminus domain. Together our data fuels the view that the extracellular microenvironment regulates synaptic NMDAR signaling.





07/06/2017 | autism res   IF 3.8
Behavioral abnormalities in the Fmr1-KO2 mouse model of fragile X syndrome: The relevance of early life phases.
Gaudissard J*, Ginger M*, Premoli M, Memo M, Frick A*, Pietropaolo S*

Abstract:
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a developmental disorder caused by a mutation in the X-linked FMR1 gene, coding for the FMRP protein which is largely involved in synaptic function. FXS patients present several behavioral abnormalities, including hyperactivity, anxiety, sensory hyper-responsiveness, and cognitive deficits. Autistic symptoms, e.g., altered social interaction and communication, are also often observed: FXS is indeed the most common monogenic cause of autism. Mouse models of FXS are therefore of great interest for research on both FXS and autistic pathologies. The Fmr1-KO2 mouse line is the most recent FXS model, widely used for brain studies; surprisingly, little is known about the face validity of this model, i.e., its FXS-like behavioral phenotype. Furthermore, no data are available for the age-related expression of the pathological phenotypes in this mouse line, a critical issue for modelling neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we performed an extensive behavioral characterization of the KO2 model at infancy, adolescent and adult ages. Hyperactivity, altered emotionality, sensory hyper-responsiveness and memory deficits were already present in KO mice at adolescence and remained evident at adulthood. Alterations in social behaviors were instead observed only in young KO animals: during the first 2 weeks of life, KOs emitted longer ultrasonic vocalizations compared to their WT littermates and as adolescents they displayed more aggressive behaviors towards a conspecific. These results strongly support the face validity of the KO2 mouse as a model for FXS, at the same time demonstrating that its ability to recapitulate social autistic-relevant phenotypes depends on early testing ages. Autism Res 2017. (c) 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.





03/06/2017 | Neuroscience   IF 3.3
The embryonic development of hindbrain respiratory networks is unaffected by mutation of the planar polarity protein Scribble.
Chevalier M, Cardoit L, Moreau M, Sans N, Montcouquiol M, Simmers J, Thoby-Brisson M

Abstract:
The central command for breathing arises mainly from two interconnected rhythmogenic hindbrain networks, the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG or epF at embryonic stages) and the preBotzinger complex (preBotC), which are comprised of a limited number of neurons located in confined regions of the ventral medulla. In rodents, both networks become active toward the end of gestation but little is known about the signaling pathways involved in their anatomical and functional establishment during embryogenesis. During embryonic development, epF and preBotC neurons migrate from their territories of origin to their final positions in ventral brainstem areas. Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling, including the molecule Scrib, is known to control the developmental migration of several hindbrain neuronal groups. Accordingly, a homozygous mutation of Scrib leads to severe disruption of hindbrain anatomy and function. Here, we aimed to determine whether Scrib is also involved in the prenatal development of the hindbrain nuclei controlling breathing. We combined immunostaining, calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings of neuronal activity in isolated in vitro preparations. In the Scrib mutant, despite severe neural tube defects, epF and preBotC neurons settled at their expected hindbrain positions. Furthermore, both networks remained capable of generating rhythmically organized, respiratory-related activities and exhibited normal sensitivity to pharmacological agents known to modify respiratory circuit function. Thus Scrib is not required for the proper migration of epF and preBotC neurons during mouse embryogenesis. Our findings thus further illustrate the robustness and specificity of the developmental processes involved in the establishment of hindbrain respiratory circuits.