Publications du Neurocentre Magendie

Les publications







IF du Neurocentre
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692 publications

* equal contribution
Les IF indiqués ont été collectés par le Web of Sciences en Juin 2018



24/01/2019 | Neurobiol Dis   IF 5.2
Cannabinoid type-1 receptor blockade restores neurological phenotypes in two models for Down syndrome.
Navarro-Romero A, Vazquez-Oliver A, Gomis-Gonzalez M, Garzon-Montesinos C, Falcon-Moya R, Pastor A, Martin-Garcia E, Pizarro N, Busquets-Garcia A, Revest JM, Piazza PV, Bosch F, Dierssen M, de la Torre R, Rodriguez-Moreno A, Maldonado R, Ozaita A

Abstract:
Intellectual disability is the most limiting hallmark of Down syndrome, for which there is no gold-standard clinical treatment yet. The endocannabinoid system is a widespread neuromodulatory system involved in multiple functions including learning and memory processes. Alterations of this system contribute to the pathogenesis of several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome has not been explored before. We used the best-characterized preclinical model of Down syndrome, the segmentally trisomic Ts65Dn model. In male Ts65Dn mice, cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) expression was enhanced and its function increased in hippocampal excitatory terminals. Knockdown of CB1R in the hippocampus of male Ts65Dn mice restored hippocampal-dependent memory. Concomitant with this result, pharmacological inhibition of CB1R restored memory deficits, hippocampal synaptic plasticity and adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. Notably, the blockade of CB1R also normalized hippocampal-dependent memory in female Ts65Dn mice. To further investigate the mechanisms involved, we used a second transgenic mouse model overexpressing a single gene candidate for Down syndrome cognitive phenotypes, the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A). CB1R pharmacological blockade similarly improved cognitive performance, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis in transgenic male Dyrk1A mice. Our results identify CB1R as a novel druggable target potentially relevant for the improvement of cognitive deficits associated with Down syndrome.





07/01/2019 | Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med   IF 4
Development and Patterning of the Cochlea: From Convergent Extension to Planar Polarity.
Montcouquiol M, Kelley MW

Abstract:
Within the mammalian cochlea, sensory hair cells and supporting cells are aligned in curvilinear rows that extend along the length of the tonotopic axis. In addition, all of the cells within the epithelium are uniformly polarized across the orthogonal neural-abneural axis. Finally, each hair cell is intrinsically polarized as revealed by the presence of an asymmetrically shaped and apically localized stereociliary bundle. It has been known for some time that many of the developmental processes that regulate these patterning events are mediated, to some extent, by the core planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. This article will review more recent work demonstrating how components of the PCP pathway interact with cytoskeletal motor proteins to regulate cochlear outgrowth. Finally, a signaling pathway originally identified for its role in asymmetric cell divisions has recently been shown to mediate several aspects of intrinsic hair cell polarity, including kinocilia migration, bundle shape, and elongation.





2019 | Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
Valence Coding in Amygdala Circuits
Pignatelli M, Beyeler A

Abstract:
The neural mechanisms underlying emotional valence are at the interface between perception and action, integrating inputs from the external environment with past experiences to guide the behavior of an organism. Depending on the positive or negative valence assigned to an environmental stimulus, the organism will approach or avoid the source of the stimulus. Multiple convergent studies have demonstrated that the amygdala complex is a critical node of the circuits assigning valence. Here we examine the current progress in identifying valence coding properties of neural populations in different nuclei of the amygdala, based on their activity, connectivity, and gene expression profile.





20/12/2018 | j neuroinflammation   IF 5.2
Sequential alteration of microglia and astrocytes in the rat thalamus following spinal nerve ligation.
Blaszczyk L, Maitre M, Leste-Lasserre T, Clark S, Cota D, Oliet SHR, Fenelon VS

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Spinal reactive astrocytes and microglia are known to participate to the initiation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. However, whether reactive astrocytes and microglia in thalamic nuclei that process sensory-discriminative aspects of pain play a role in pain behavior remains poorly investigated. Therefore, the present study evaluated whether the presence of reactive glia (hypertrophy, increased number and upregulation of glial markers) in the ventral posterolateral thalamic nucleus (VPL) correlates with pain symptoms, 14 and 28 days after unilateral L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats. METHODS: Mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia (von Frey filament stimulation) as well as ambulatory pain (dynamic weight bearing apparatus) were assessed. Levels of nine glial transcripts were determined by quantitative real-time PCR on laser microdissected thalamic nuclei, and levels of proteins were assessed by Western blot. We also studied by immunohistofluorescence the expression of glial markers that label processes (GFAP for astrocytes and iba-1 for microglia) and cell body (S100beta for astrocytes and iba-1 for microglia) and quantified the immunostained surface and the number of astrocytes and microglia (conventional counts and optical dissector method of stereological counting). RESULTS: Differential, time-dependent responses were observed concerning microglia and astrocytes. Specifically, at day 14, iba-1 immunostained area and number of iba-1 immunopositive cells were decreased in the VPL of SNL as compared to naive rats. By contrast, at day 28, GFAP-immunostained area was increased in the VPL of SNL as compared to naive rats while number of GFAP/S100beta immunopositive cells remained unchanged. Using quantitative real-time PCR of laser microdissected VPL, we found a sequential increase in mRNA expression of cathepsin S (day 14), fractalkine (day 28), and fractalkine receptor (day 14), three well-known markers of microglial reactivity. Using Western blot, we confirmed an increase in protein expression of fractalkine receptor at day 14. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a sequential alteration of microglia and astrocytes in the thalamus of animals with lesioned peripheral nerves. Furthermore, our data report unprecedented concomitant molecular signs of microglial activation and morphological signs of microglial decline in the thalamus of these animals.





07/11/2018 | Nature   IF 41.6
Dopamine enhances signal-to-noise ratio in cortical-brainstem encoding of aversive stimuli.
Vander Weele CM, Siciliano CA, Matthews GA, Namburi P, Izadmehr EM, Espinel IC, Nieh EH, Schut EHS, Padilla-Coreano N, Burgos-Robles A, Chang CJ, Kimchi EY, Beyeler A, Wichmann R, Wildes CP, Tye KM

Abstract:
Dopamine modulates medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) activity to mediate diverse behavioural functions(1,2); however, the precise circuit computations remain unknown. One potentially unifying model by which dopamine may underlie a diversity of functions is by modulating the signal-to-noise ratio in subpopulations of mPFC neurons(3-6), where neural activity conveying sensory information (signal) is amplified relative to spontaneous firing (noise). Here we demonstrate that dopamine increases the signal-to-noise ratio of responses to aversive stimuli in mPFC neurons projecting to the dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG). Using an electrochemical approach, we reveal the precise time course of pinch-evoked dopamine release in the mPFC, and show that mPFC dopamine biases behavioural responses to aversive stimuli. Activation of mPFC-dPAG neurons is sufficient to drive place avoidance and defensive behaviours. mPFC-dPAG neurons display robust shock-induced excitations, as visualized by single-cell, projection-defined microendoscopic calcium imaging. Finally, photostimulation of dopamine terminals in the mPFC reveals an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio in mPFC-dPAG responses to aversive stimuli. Together, these data highlight how dopamine in the mPFC can selectively route sensory information to specific downstream circuits, representing a potential circuit mechanism for valence processing.





11/2018 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 11.6
CaMKIIbeta regulates nucleus-centrosome coupling in locomoting neurons of the developing cerebral cortex.
Nicole O, Bell DM, Leste-Lasserre T, Doat H, Guillemot F, Pacary E



11/2018 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 11.6
A novel role for CAMKIIbeta in the regulation of cortical neuron migration: implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.
Nicole O, Bell DM, Leste-Lasserre T, Doat H, Guillemot F, Pacary E

Abstract:
Perturbation of CaMKIIbeta expression has been associated with multiple neuropsychiatric diseases, highlighting CaMKIIbeta as a gene of interest. Yet, in contrast to CaMKIIalpha, the specific functions of CaMKIIbeta in the brain remain poorly explored. Here, we reveal a novel function for this CaMKII isoform in vivo during neuronal development. By using in utero electroporation, we show that CaMKIIbeta is an important regulator of radial migration of projection neurons during cerebral cortex development. Knockdown of CaMKIIbeta causes accelerated migration of nascent pyramidal neurons, whereas overexpression of CaMKIIbeta inhibits migration, demonstrating that precise regulation of CaMKIIbeta expression is required for correct neuronal migration. More precisely, CaMKIIbeta controls the multipolar-bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate through its actin-binding and -bundling activities. In addition, our data indicate that a fine-tuned balance between CaMKIIbeta and cofilin activities is necessary to ensure proper migration of cortical neurons. Thus, our findings define a novel isoform-specific function for CaMKIIbeta, demonstrating that CaMKIIbeta has a major biological function in the developing brain.





16/10/2018 | Acta Neuropathological Communication
Modulation of astrocyte reactivity improves functional deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.
Ceyzeriat K, Ben Haim L, Denizot A, Pommier D, Matos M, Guillemaud O, Palomares MA, Abjean L, Petit F, Gipchtein P, Gaillard MC, Guillermier M, Bernier S, Gaudin M, Auregan G, Josephine C, Dechamps N, Veran J, Langlais V, Cambon K, Bemelmans AP, Baijer J, Bonvento G, Dhenain M, Deleuze JF, Oliet SHR, Brouillet E, Hantraye P, Carrillo-de Sauvage MA, Olaso R, Panatier A, Escartin C

Abstract:
Astrocyte reactivity and neuroinflammation are hallmarks of CNS pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. However, the specific role of reactive astrocytes is still debated. This controversy may stem from the fact that most strategies used to modulate astrocyte reactivity and explore its contribution to disease outcomes have only limited specificity. Moreover, reactive astrocytes are now emerging as heterogeneous cells and all types of astrocyte reactivity may not be controlled efficiently by such strategies.Here, we used cell type-specific approaches in vivo and identified the JAK2-STAT3 pathway, as necessary and sufficient for the induction and maintenance of astrocyte reactivity. Modulation of this cascade by viral gene transfer in mouse astrocytes efficiently controlled several morphological and molecular features of reactivity. Inhibition of this pathway in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease improved three key pathological hallmarks by reducing amyloid deposition, improving spatial learning and restoring synaptic deficits.In conclusion, the JAK2-STAT3 cascade operates as a master regulator of astrocyte reactivity in vivo. Its inhibition offers new therapeutic opportunities for Alzheimer's disease.





10/2018 | Curr Opin Neurobiol   IF 6.5
Neuronal coding mechanisms mediating fear behavior.
Rozeske RR, Herry C

Abstract:
The behavioral repertoire of an organism can be highly diverse, spanning from social to defensive. How an animal efficiently switches between distinct behaviors is a fundamental question whose inquiry will provide insights into the mechanisms that are necessary for an organism's survival. Previous work aimed at identifying the neural systems responsible for defensive behaviors, such as freezing, has demonstrated critical interactions between the prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Indeed, this foundational research has provided an indispensable anatomical framework that investigators are now using to understand the physiological mechanisms of defined neural circuits within the prefrontal cortex that code for the rapid and flexible expression of defensive behaviors. Here we review recent findings demonstrating temporal and rate coding mechanisms of freezing behavior in the prefrontal cortex. We hypothesize that anatomical features, such as target structure and cortical layer, as well as the nature of the information to be coded, may be critical factors determining the coding scheme. Furthermore, detailed behavioral analyses may reveal subtypes of defensive behaviors that represent the principle factor governing coding selection.





23/09/2018 | Exp Neurol   IF 4.5
Serotonin2B receptors in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus exert a GABA-mediated tonic inhibitory control on serotonin neurons.
Cathala A, Devroye C, Drutel G, Revest JM, Artigas F, Spampinato U

Abstract:
The central serotonin2B receptor (5-HT2BR) is a well-established modulator of dopamine (DA) neuron activity in the rodent brain. Recent studies in rats have shown that the effect of 5-HT2BR antagonists on accumbal and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) DA outflow results from a primary action in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), where they activate 5-HT neurons innervating the mPFC. Although the mechanisms underlying this interaction remain largely unknown, data in the literature suggest the involvement of DRN GABAergic interneurons in the control of 5-HT activity. The present study examined this hypothesis using in vivo (intracerebral microdialysis) and in vitro (immunohistochemistry coupled to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) experimental approaches in rats. Intraperitoneal (0.16mg/kg) or intra-DRN (1muM) administration of the selective 5-HT2BR antagonist RS 127445 increased 5-HT outflow in both the DRN and the mPFC, these effects being prevented by the intra-DRN perfusion of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (100muM), as well as by the subcutaneous (0.16mg/kg) or the intra-DRN (0.1muM) administration of the selective 5-HT1AR antagonist WAY 100635. The increase in DRN 5-HT outflow induced by the intra-DRN administration of the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram (0.1muM) was potentiated by the intra-DRN administration (0.5muM) of RS 127445 only in the absence of bicuculline perfusion. Finally, in vitro experiments revealed the presence of the 5-HT2BR mRNA on DRN GABAergic interneurons. Altogether, these results show that, in the rat DRN, 5-HT2BRs are located on GABAergic interneurons, and exert a tonic inhibitory control on 5-HT neurons innervating the mPFC.