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Fanny MUNSCH




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10 publication(s) depuis Janvier 2016:


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15/02/2018 | J Neurol Sci   IF 2.4
Preliminary evidence of the cerebellar role on cognitive performances in clinically isolated syndrome.
Moroso A, Ruet A, Lamargue-Hamel D, Munsch F, Deloire M, Ouallet JC, Cubizolle S, Charre-Morin J, Saubusse A, Tourdias T, Dousset V, Brochet B

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Cerebellar and cognitive dysfunction can occur early in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). Eye tracking is a reliable tool for the evaluation of both subtle cerebellar symptoms and cognitive impairment. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the early cognitive profile using neuropsychological and ocular motor (OM) testing in CIS with and without cerebellar dysfunction with OM testing compared to healthy subjects (HS). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients and 12 HC underwent OM and neuropsychological testing. Cerebellar impairment was defined by the registration of saccadic intrusions and/or at least 10% of dysmetria during ocular motor recording. Visually guided saccade (VGS), memory-guided saccade (MGS) and antisaccade (AS) paradigms were compared to neuropsychological assessments. RESULTS: The group of patients with cerebellar dysfunction (n=16) performed worse on MGS latencies and error rates, and had worse working memory, executive function and information processing speed (IPS) z scores than patients without cerebellar dysfunction. IPS was correlated with the AS error rate in all patients and with the VGS error rate and the MGS final eye position ratio in cerebellar patients. CONCLUSION: Eye tracking is a sensitive tool to assess cognitive and cerebellar dysfunctions in CIS. In CIS patients, cerebellar impairment is associated with working memory, executive functions and IPS slowness.




08/2017 | Stroke   IF 6.2
Admission Brain Cortical Volume: An Independent Determinant of Poststroke Cognitive Vulnerability.
Sagnier S, Catheline G, Dilharreguy B, Munsch F, Bigourdan A, Poli M, Debruxelles S, Olindo S, Renou P, Rouanet F, Dousset V, Tourdias T, Sibon I

Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Several markers of poststroke cognitive impairment have been reported. The role of brain cortical volume remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of brain cortical volume on cognitive outcomes using a voxel-based morphometry approach in subjects without prestroke dementia. METHODS: Ischemic stroke patients were prospectively recruited 24 to 72 hours post stroke (M0). Cognition was evaluated at M0, 3 months, and 1 year (M12) using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, the Isaacs set test, and the Zazzo's cancellation task. A 3-T brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed at M0. Grey matter (GM) was segmented using Statistical Parametric Mapping 12 software. Association between global GM volume and cognitive score slopes between M0 and M12 was evaluated using a linear mixed model. Correlations between focal GM volumes and changes in cognitive performance were evaluated using Statistical Parametric Mapping 12. RESULTS: Two-hundred forty-eight patients were included (mean age 65+/-SD 14 years old, 66% men). Global GM volume was significantly associated with changes in Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores (beta=0.01; P=0.04) and in the number of errors on the Zazzo's cancellation task (beta=-0.02; P=0.04) independently of other clinical/radiological confounders. Subjects with lower GM volumes in the left fronto-temporo-insular cortex were more vulnerable to transient Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Isaacs set test impairment. Subjects with lower GM volumes in right temporo-insular cortex, together with basal ganglia, were more vulnerable to transient cognitive impairment on the Zazzo's cancellation task. CONCLUSIONS: Smaller cortical volumes in fronto-temporo-insular areas measured 24 to 72 hours post stroke are associated with cognitive vulnerability in the subacute stroke phase.




01/07/2017 | Brain   IF 10.8
Thalamic alterations remote to infarct appear as focal iron accumulation and impact clinical outcome.
Kuchcinski G, Munsch F, Lopes R, Bigourdan A, Su J, Sagnier S, Renou P, Pruvo JP, Rutt BK, Dousset V, Sibon I, Tourdias T

Abstract:
See Duering and Schmidt (doi:10.1093/awx135) for a scientific commentary on this article.Thalamic alterations have been observed in infarcts initially sparing the thalamus but interrupting thalamo-cortical or cortico-thalamic projections. We aimed at extending this knowledge by demonstrating with in vivo imaging sensitive to iron accumulation, one marker of neurodegeneration, that (i) secondary thalamic alterations are focally located in specific thalamic nuclei depending on the initial infarct location; and (ii) such secondary alterations can contribute independently to the long-term outcome. To tackle this issue, 172 patients with an infarct initially sparing the thalamus were prospectively evaluated clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging to quantify iron through R2* map at 24-72 h and at 1-year follow-up. An asymmetry index was used to compare R2* within the thalamus ipsilateral versus contralateral to infarct and we focused on the 95th percentile of R2* as a metric of high iron content. Spatial distribution within the thalamus was analysed on an average R2* map from the entire cohort. The asymmetry index of the 95th percentile within individual nuclei (medio-dorsal, pulvinar, lateral group) were compared according to the initial infarct location in simple and multiple regression analyses and using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. Associations between the asymmetry index of the 95th percentile and functional, cognitive and emotional outcome were calculated in multiple regression models. We showed that R2* was not modified at 24-72 h but showed heterogeneous increase at 1 year mainly within the medio-dorsal and pulvinar nuclei. The asymmetry index of the 95th percentile within the medio-dorsal nucleus was significantly associated with infarcts involving anterior areas (frontal P = 0.05, temporal P = 0.02, lenticular P = 0.01) while the asymmetry index of the 95th percentile within the pulvinar nucleus was significantly associated with infarcts involving posterior areas (parietal P = 0.046, temporal P < 0.001) independently of age, gender and infarct volume, which was confirmed by voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. The asymmetry index of the 95th percentile within the entire thalamus at 1 year was independently associated with poor functional outcome (P = 0.04), poor cognitive outcome (P = 0.03), post-stroke anxiety (P = 0.04) and post-stroke depression (P = 0.02). We have therefore identified that iron accumulates within the thalamus ipsilateral to infarct after a delay with a focal distribution that is strongly linked to the initial infarct location (in relation with the pattern of connectivity between thalamic nuclei and cortical areas or deep nuclei), which independently contributes to functional, cognitive and emotional outcome.




2017 | PLoS ONE   IF 2.8
Microstructural analyses of the posterior cerebellar lobules in relapsing-onset multiple sclerosis and their implication in cognitive impairment.
Moroso A, Ruet A, Lamargue-Hamel D, Munsch F, Deloire M, Coupe P, Charre-Morin J, Saubusse A, Ouallet JC, Planche V, Tourdias T, Dousset V, Brochet B

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The posterior cerebellar lobules seem to be the anatomical substrate of cognitive cerebellar processes, but their microstructural alterations in multiple sclerosis (MS) remain unclear. OBJECTIVES: To correlate diffusion metrics in lobules VI to VIIIb in persons with clinically isolated syndrome (PwCIS) and in cognitively impaired persons with MS (CIPwMS) with their cognitive performances. METHODS: Sixty-nine patients (37 PwCIS, 32 CIPwMS) and 36 matched healthy subjects (HS) underwent 3T magnetic resonance imaging, including 3D T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated within each lobule and in the cerebellar peduncles. We investigated the correlations between cognitive outcomes and the diffusion parameters of cerebellar sub-structures and performed multiple linear regression analysis to predict cognitive disability. RESULTS: FA was generally lower and MD was higher in the cerebellum and specifically in the vermis Crus II, lobules VIIb and VIIIb in CIPwMS compared with PwCIS and HS. In hierarchical regression analyses, 31% of the working memory z score variance was explained by FA in the left lobule VI and in the left superior peduncle. Working memory was also associated with MD in the vermis Crus II. FA in the left lobule VI and right VIIIa predicted part of the information processing speed (IPS) z scores. CONCLUSION: DTI indicators of cerebellar microstructural damage were associated with cognitive deficits in MS. Our results suggested that cerebellar lobular alterations have an impact on attention, working memory and IPS.




2017 | Front Aging Neurosci   IF 3.6
Gait Change Is Associated with Cognitive Outcome after an Acute Ischemic Stroke.
Sagnier S, Renou P, Olindo S, Debruxelles S, Poli M, Rouanet F, Munsch F, Tourdias T, Sibon I

Abstract:
Background: Cognition and gait have often been studied separately after stroke whereas it has been suggested that these two domains could interact through a cognitive-motor interference. Objective: To evaluate the influence of gait changes on cognitive outcome after an ischemic stroke (IS). Methods: We conducted a prospective and monocentric study including patients admitted for an acute supratentorial IS with a National Institute of Health Stroke Score



01/12/2016 | Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci   IF 3.4
Optic Radiations Microstructural Changes in Glaucoma and Association With Severity: A Study Using 3Tesla-Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging.
Tellouck L, Durieux M, Coupe P, Cougnard-Gregoire A, Tellouck J, Tourdias T, Munsch F, Garrigues A, Helmer C, Malet F, Dartigues JF, Dousset V, Delcourt C, Schweitzer C

Abstract:
Purpose: To compare microstructural changes along the optical radiations and brain structure volumes between glaucoma and control subjects using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and to analyze their association with severity of the disease. Methods: A total of 50 open-angle glaucoma subjects and 50 healthy age- and sex-matched controls underwent detailed ophthalmologic examinations (including visual field testing [VF], funduscopy, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography) as well as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD) were quantified semiautomatically along the optical radiations. DTI parameters and volumes of specific brain structures were compared between cases and controls using conditional logistic regression. Association between DTI metrics and the severity of the disease was studied using linear mixed regression analyses. Results: In glaucoma subjects, optic radiations FA was significantly lower (0.57 vs. 0.59; P = 0.02) and RD was significantly higher (52.78 10-5 mm2/s vs. 49.74 10-5 mm2/s; P = 0.03) than in controls. Optic radiations FA was significantly correlated with homolateral functional and structural damage of glaucoma (mean deviation of VF [P = 0.03], retinal nerve fiber layer thickness [P = 0.03], vertical cup to disc ratio [P = 0.0007]). Volume and DTI parameters of other brain structures (including hippocampus) were not significantly different between glaucoma patients and controls. Conclusions: We evidenced microstructural modifications along visual pathways of glaucoma patients and these alterations were correlated with disease severity. The association of glaucoma with other neurodegenerative alterations would need further exploration and a prospective follow-up of our cohort of subjects. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01621841).




27/10/2016 | J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry   IF 7.1
Posterior lobules of the cerebellum and information processing speed at various stages of multiple sclerosis.
Moroso A, Ruet A, Lamargue-Hamel D, Munsch F, Deloire M, Coupe P, Ouallet JC, Planche V, Moscufo N, Meier DS, Tourdias T, Guttmann CR, Dousset V, Brochet B

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Cerebellar damage has been implicated in information processing speed (IPS) impairment associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) that might result from functional disconnection in the frontocerebellar loop. Structural alterations in individual posterior lobules, in which cognitive functioning seems preponderant, are still unknown. Our aim was to investigate the impact of grey matter (GM) volume alterations in lobules VI to VIIIb on IPS in persons with clinically isolated syndrome (PwCIS), MS (PwMS) and healthy subjects (HS). METHODS: 69 patients (37 PwCIS, 32 PwMS) and 36 HS underwent 3 T MRI including 3-dimensional T1-weighted MRIs. Cerebellum lobules were segmented using SUIT V.3.0 to estimate their normalised GM volume. Neuropsychological testing was performed to assess IPS and main cognitive functions. RESULTS: Normalised GM volumes were significantly different between PwMS and HS for the right (p<0.001) and left lobule VI (p<0.01), left crus I, right VIIb and entire cerebellum (p<0.05 for each comparison) and between PwMS and PwCIS for all lobules in subregions VI and left crus I (p<0.05). IPS, attention and working memory were impaired in PwMS compared with PwCIS. In the whole population of patients (PwMS and PwCIS), GM loss in vermis VI (R2=0.36; p<0.05 when considering age and T2 lesion volume as covariates) were associated with IPS impairment. CONCLUSIONS: GM volume decrease in posterior lobules (especially vermis VI) was associated with reduced IPS. Our results suggest a significant impact of posterior lobules pathology in corticocerebellar loop disruption resulting in automation and cognitive optimisation lack in MS. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrail NCT01207856, NCT01865357; Pre-results.




25/10/2016 | Mult Scler   IF 5.3
Hippocampal microstructural damage correlates with memory impairment in clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of multiple sclerosis.
Planche V, Ruet A, Coupe P, Lamargue-Hamel D, Deloire M, Pereira B, Manjon JV, Munsch F, Moscufo N, Meier DS, Guttmann CR, Dousset V, Brochet B, Tourdias T

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) could reveal early hippocampal damage and clinically relevant correlates of memory impairment in persons with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: A total of 37 persons with CIS, 32 with MS and 36 controls prospectively included from 2011 to 2014 were tested for cognitive performances and scanned with 3T-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess volumetric and DTI changes within the hippocampus, whole brain volume and T2-lesion load. RESULTS: While there was no hippocampal atrophy in the CIS group, hippocampal fractional anisotropy (FA) was significantly decreased compared to controls. Decrease in hippocampal FA together with increased mean diffusivity (MD) was even more prominent in MS patients. In CIS, hippocampal MD was correlated with episodic verbal memory performance (r = -0.57, p = 0.0002 and odds ratio (OR) = 0.058, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.0057-0.59, p = 0.016 adjusted for age, gender, depression and T2-lesion load), but not with cognitive tasks unrelated to hippocampal functions. Hippocampal MD was the only variable discriminating memory-impaired from memory-preserved persons with CIS (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.77, sensitivity = 90.0%, specificity = 70.3%, positive predictive value (PPV) = 52.9%, negative predictive value (NPV) = 95.0%). CONCLUSION: DTI alterations within the hippocampus might reflect early neurodegenerative processes that are correlated with episodic memory performance, discriminating persons with CIS according to their memory status.




04/2016 | Stroke   IF 6.2
Early Fiber Number Ratio Is a Surrogate of Corticospinal Tract Integrity and Predicts Motor Recovery After Stroke.
Bigourdan A, Munsch F, Coupe P, Guttmann CR, Sagnier S, Renou P, Debruxelles S, Poli M, Dousset V, Sibon I, Tourdias T

Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The contribution of imaging metrics to predict poststroke motor recovery needs to be clarified. We tested the added value of early diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the corticospinal tract toward predicting long-term motor recovery. METHODS: One hundred seventeen patients were prospectively assessed at 24 to 72 hours and 1 year after ischemic stroke with diffusion tensor imaging and motor scores (Fugl-Meyer). The initial fiber number ratio (iFNr) and final fiber number ratio were computed as the number of streamlines along the affected corticospinal tract normalized to the unaffected side and were compared with each other. The prediction of motor recovery (DeltaFugl-Meyer) was first modeled using initial Fugl-Meyer and iFNr. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models were also used to study the association of iFNr, initial Fugl-Meyer, age, and stroke volume with Fugl-Meyer at 1 year. RESULTS: The iFNr correlated with the final fiber number ratio at 1 year (r=0.70; P<0.0001). The initial Fugl-Meyer strongly predicted motor recovery ( approximately 73% of initial impairment) for all patients except those with initial severe stroke (Fugl-Meyer<50). For these severe patients (n=26), initial Fugl-Meyer was not correlated with motor recovery (R(2)=0.13; p=ns), whereas iFNr showed strong correlation (R(2)=0.56; P<0.0001). In multivariate analysis, the iFNr was an independent predictor of motor outcome (beta=2.601; 95% confidence interval=0.304-5.110; P=0.031), improving prediction compared with using only initial Fugl-Meyer, age, and stroke volume (P=0.026). CONCLUSIONS: Early measurement of FNr at 24 to 72 hours poststroke is a surrogate marker of corticospinal tract integrity and provides independent prediction of motor outcome at 1 year especially for patients with severe initial impairment.




01/2016 | Stroke   IF 6.2
Stroke Location Is an Independent Predictor of Cognitive Outcome.
Munsch F, Sagnier S, Asselineau J, Bigourdan A, Guttmann CR, Debruxelles S, Poli M, Renou P, Perez P, Dousset V, Sibon I, Tourdias T

Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: On top of functional outcome, accurate prediction of cognitive outcome for stroke patients is an unmet need with major implications for clinical management. We investigated whether stroke location may contribute independent prognostic value to multifactorial predictive models of functional and cognitive outcomes. METHODS: Four hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were prospectively assessed with magnetic resonance imaging at 24 to 72 hours and at 3 months for functional outcome using the modified Rankin Scale and cognitive outcome using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Statistical maps of functional and cognitive eloquent regions were derived from the first 215 patients (development sample) using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. We used multivariate logistic regression models to study the influence of stroke location (number of eloquent voxels from voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping maps), age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and stroke volume on modified Rankin Scale and MoCA. The second part of our cohort was used as an independent replication sample. RESULTS: In univariate analyses, stroke location, age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and stroke volume were all predictive of poor modified Rankin Scale and MoCA. In multivariable analyses, stroke location remained the strongest independent predictor of MoCA and significantly improved the prediction compared with using only age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and stroke volume (area under the curve increased from 0.697-0.771; difference=0.073; 95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.155). In contrast, stroke location did not persist as independent predictor of modified Rankin Scale that was mainly driven by initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (area under the curve going from 0.840 to 0.835). Similar results were obtained in the replication sample. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke location is an independent predictor of cognitive outcome (MoCA) at 3 months post stroke.