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Mireille MONTCOUQUIOL




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Cursus:
PhD Université Montpellier II (1997)
Postdoctoral Research Associate, UVA, Charlottesville, USA (1997-2002)
NIH Postdoctoral fellow, MD, USA (2002-2005)
CR1 INSERM (2007)
DR2 INSERM (2014)

Expertise: cell biology, development, neuroscience, imaging



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47 publication(s) depuis Novembre 1997:


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* equal contribution
Les IF indiqués ont été collectés par le Web of Sciences en




29/07/2014 | Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A   IF 9.5
A dual role for planar cell polarity genes in ciliated cells.
Boutin C, Labedan P, Dimidschstein J, Richard F, Cremer H, Andre P, Yang Y, Montcouquiol M, Goffinet AM, Tissir F

Abstract:
In the nervous system, cilia dysfunction perturbs the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid, thus affecting neurogenesis and brain homeostasis. A role for planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling in the orientation of cilia (rotational polarity) and ciliogenesis is established. However, whether and how PCP regulates cilia positioning in the apical domain (translational polarity) in radial progenitors and ependymal cells remain unclear. By analysis of a large panel of mutant mice, we show that two PCP signals are operating in ciliated cells. The first signal, controlled by cadherin, EGF-like, laminin G-like, seven-pass, G-type receptor (Celsr) 2, Celsr3, Frizzled3 (Fzd3) and Van Gogh like2 (Vangl2) organizes multicilia in individual cells (single-cell polarity), whereas the second signal, governed by Celsr1, Fzd3, and Vangl2, coordinates polarity between cells in both radial progenitors and ependymal cells (tissue polarity). Loss of either of these signals is associated with specific defects in the cytoskeleton. Our data reveal unreported functions of PCP and provide an integrated view of planar polarization of the brain ciliated cells.




09/2013 | Nat Cell Biol   IF 19.1
Primary cilium migration depends on G-protein signalling control of subapical cytoskeleton.
Ezan J , Lasvaux L , Gezer A , Novakovic A , May-Simera H , Belotti E , Lhoumeau AC , Birnbaumer L , Beer-Hammer S , Borg JP , Le Bivic A , Nurnberg B , Sans N , Montcouquiol M

Abstract:
In ciliated mammalian cells, the precise migration of the primary cilium at the apical surface of the cells, also referred to as translational polarity, defines planar cell polarity (PCP) in very early stages. Recent research has revealed a co-dependence between planar polarization of some cell types and cilium positioning at the surface of cells. This important role of the primary cilium in mammalian cells is in contrast with its absence from Drosophila melanogaster PCP establishment. Here, we show that deletion of GTP-binding protein alpha-i subunit 3 (Galphai3) and mammalian Partner of inscuteable (mPins) disrupts the migration of the kinocilium at the surface of cochlear hair cells and affects hair bundle orientation and shape. Inhibition of G-protein function in vitro leads to kinocilium migration defects, PCP phenotype and abnormal hair bundle morphology. We show that Galphai3/mPins are expressed in an apical and distal asymmetrical domain, which is opposite and complementary to an aPKC/Par-3/Par-6b expression domain, and non-overlapping with the core PCP protein Vangl2. Thus G-protein-dependent signalling controls the migration of the cilium cell autonomously, whereas core PCP signalling controls long-range tissue PCP.




09/2013 | Mol Cell Proteomics   IF 5.2
The Human PDZome: A Gateway to PSD95-Disc Large-Zonula Occludens (PDZ)-mediated Functions.
Belotti E, Polanowska J , Daulat AM , Audebert S , Thome V , Lissitzky JC , Lembo F , Blibek K , Omi S , Lenfant N , Gangar A , Montcouquiol M , Santoni MJ , Sebbagh M , Aurrand-Lions M , Angers S , Kodjabachian L , Reboul J , Borg JP

Abstract:
Protein-protein interactions organize the localization, clustering, signal transduction, and degradation of cellular proteins and are therefore implicated in numerous biological functions. These interactions are mediated by specialized domains able to bind to modified or unmodified peptides present in binding partners. Among the most broadly distributed protein interaction domains, PSD95-disc large-zonula occludens (PDZ) domains are usually able to bind carboxy-terminal sequences of their partners. In an effort to accelerate the discovery of PDZ domain interactions, we have constructed an array displaying 96% of the human PDZ domains that is amenable to rapid two-hybrid screens in yeast. We have demonstrated that this array can efficiently identify interactions using carboxy-terminal sequences of PDZ domain binders such as the E6 oncoviral protein and protein kinases (PDGFRbeta, BRSK2, PCTK1, ACVR2B, and HER4); this has been validated via mass spectrometry analysis. Taking advantage of this array, we show that PDZ domains of Scrib and SNX27 bind to the carboxy-terminal region of the planar cell polarity receptor Vangl2. We also have demonstrated the requirement of Scrib for the promigratory function of Vangl2 and described the morphogenetic function of SNX27 in the early Xenopus embryo. The resource presented here is thus adapted for the screen of PDZ interactors and, furthermore, should facilitate the understanding of PDZ-mediated functions.




05/2013 | Semin Cell Dev Biol   IF 6.1
Revisiting planar cell polarity in the inner ear.
Ezan J, Montcouquiol M

Abstract:
Since the first implication of the core planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway in stereocilia orientation of sensory hair cells in the mammalian cochlea, much has been written about this subject, in terms of understanding how this pathway can shape the mammalian hair cells and using the inner ear as a model system to understand mammalian PCP signaling. However, many conflicting results have arisen, leading to puzzling questions regarding the actual mechanism and roles of core PCP signaling in mammals and invertebrates. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge on the establishment of PCP during inner ear development and revisit the contrast between wing epithelial cells in Drosophila melanogaster and sensory epithelia in the mammalian cochlea. Notably, we focus on similarities and differences in the asymmetric distribution of core PCP proteins in the context of cell autonomous versus non-autonomous role of PCP signaling in the two systems. Additionally, we address the relationship between the kinocilium position and PCP in cochlear hair cells and increasing results suggest an alternate cell autonomous pathway in regulating PCP in sensory hair cells.




10/2012 | Development   IF 5.4
Gipc1 has a dual role in Vangl2 trafficking and hair bundle integrity in the inner ear.
Giese AP*, Ezan J*, Wang L, Lasvaux L, Lembo F, Mazzocco C, Richard E, Reboul J, Borg JP, Kelley MW, Sans N, Brigande J, Montcouquiol M

Abstract:
Vangl2 is one of the central proteins controlling the establishment of planar cell polarity in multiple tissues of different species. Previous studies suggest that the localization of the Vangl2 protein to specific intracellular microdomains is crucial for its function. However, the molecular mechanisms that control Vangl2 trafficking within a cell are largely unknown. Here, we identify Gipc1 (GAIP C-terminus interacting protein 1) as a new interactor for Vangl2, and we show that a myosin VI-Gipc1 protein complex can regulate Vangl2 traffic in heterologous cells. Furthermore, we show that in the cochlea of MyoVI mutant mice, Vangl2 presence at the membrane is increased, and that a disruption of Gipc1 function in hair cells leads to maturation defects, including defects in hair bundle orientation and integrity. Finally, stimulated emission depletion microscopy and overexpression of GFP-Vangl2 show an enrichment of Vangl2 on the supporting cell side, adjacent to the proximal membrane of hair cells. Altogether, these results indicate a broad role for Gipc1 in the development of both stereociliary bundles and cell polarization, and suggest that the strong asymmetry of Vangl2 observed in early postnatal cochlear epithelium is mostly a 'tissue' polarity readout.




03/09/2012 | J Cell Biol   IF 8.8
Dishevelled stabilization by the ciliopathy protein Rpgrip1l is essential for planar cell polarity.
Mahuzier A , Gaude HM , Grampa V , Anselme I , Silbermann F , Leroux-Berger M , Delacour D , Ezan J , Montcouquiol M , Saunier S , Schneider-Maunoury S , Vesque C

Abstract:
Cilia are at the core of planar polarity cellular events in many systems. However, the molecular mechanisms by which they influence the polarization process are unclear. Here, we identify the function of the ciliopathy protein Rpgrip1l in planar polarity. In the mouse cochlea and in the zebrafish floor plate, Rpgrip1l was required for positioning the basal body along the planar polarity axis. Rpgrip1l was also essential for stabilizing dishevelled at the cilium base in the zebrafish floor plate and in mammalian renal cells. In rescue experiments, we showed that in the zebrafish floor plate the function of Rpgrip1l in planar polarity was mediated by dishevelled stabilization. In cultured cells, Rpgrip1l participated in a complex with inversin and nephrocystin-4, two ciliopathy proteins known to target dishevelled to the proteasome, and, in this complex, Rpgrip1l prevented dishevelled degradation. We thus uncover a ciliopathy protein complex that finely tunes dishevelled levels, thereby modulating planar cell polarity processes.




01/2012 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 11.6
SHANK3 mutations identified in autism lead to modification of dendritic spine morphology via an actin-dependent mechanism.
Durand CM, Perroy J, Loll F, Perrais D, Fagni L, Bourgeron T, Montcouquiol M, Sans N

Abstract:
Genetic mutations of SHANK3 have been reported in patients with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. At the synapse, Shank3/ProSAP2 is a scaffolding protein that connects glutamate receptors to the actin cytoskeleton via a chain of intermediary elements. Although genetic studies have repeatedly confirmed the association of SHANK3 mutations with susceptibility to psychiatric disorders, very little is known about the neuronal consequences of these mutations. Here, we report the functional effects of two de novo mutations (STOP and Q321R) and two inherited variations (R12C and R300C) identified in patients with ASD. We show that Shank3 is located at the tip of actin filaments and enhances its polymerization. Shank3 also participates in growth cone motility in developing neurons. The truncating mutation (STOP) strongly affects the development and morphology of dendritic spines, reduces synaptic transmission in mature neurons and also inhibits the effect of Shank3 on growth cone motility. The de novo mutation in the ankyrin domain (Q321R) modifies the roles of Shank3 in spine induction and morphology, and actin accumulation in spines and affects growth cone motility. Finally, the two inherited mutations (R12C and R300C) have intermediate effects on spine density and synaptic transmission. Therefore, although inherited by healthy parents, the functional effects of these mutations strongly suggest that they could represent risk factors for ASD. Altogether, these data provide new insights into the synaptic alterations caused by SHANK3 mutations in humans and provide a robust cellular readout for the development of knowledge-based therapies.




2012 | PLoS ONE   IF 2.8
Molecular characterisation of endogenous Vangl2/Vangl1 heteromeric protein complexes.
Belotti E, Puvirajesinghe TM , Audebert S , Baudelet E , Camoin L , Pierres M , Lasvaux L , Ferracci G , Montcouquiol M , Borg JP

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Mutations in the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) core gene Vangl2 cause the most severe neural tube defects (NTD) in mice and humans. Genetic studies show that the Vangl2 gene genetically interacts with a close homologue Vangl1. How precisely Vangl2 and Vangl1 proteins interact and crosstalk has remained a difficult issue to address, with the main obstacle being the accurate discrimination of the two proteins, which share close sequence homology. Experimental evidence previously presented has been sparse and addressed with ectopically expressed proteins or with antibodies unable to biochemically discriminate Vangl1 from Vangl2, therefore giving rise to unclear results. METHODOLOGY AND MAIN FINDINGS: A highly specific monoclonal anti-Vangl2 antibody was generated and rigorously tested on both recombinant and extracted Vangl2 using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, western blot, and immunoprecipitation experiments. This antibody efficiently affinity-purified Vangl2 from cell lysates and allowed the unambiguous identification of endogenous Vangl2 by proteomic analysis. Vangl1 was also present in Vangl2 immunoprecipitates, establishing the first biochemical evidence for the existence of Vangl2/Vangl1 heterodimers at an endogenous level. Epitope-tagged Vangl2 and Vangl1 confirmed that both proteins interact and colocalize at the plasma membrane. The Vangl2 antibody is able to acutely assess differential expression levels of Vangl2 protein in culture cell lines, as corroborated with gene expression analysis. We characterised Vangl2 expression in the cochlea of homozygous and heterozygous Lp mutant mice bearing a point mutation within the C-terminal Vangl2 region that leads to profound PCP defects. Our antibody could detect much lower levels of Vangl2(Lp) protein in mutant mice compared to the wild type mice. CONCLUSION: Our results provide an in-depth biochemical characterisation of the interaction observed between Vangl paralogues.




Abstract:
The avian inner ear possesses a remarkable ability to regenerate sensory hair cells after ototoxic injury. Regenerated hair cells possess phenotypes and innervation that are similar to those found in the undamaged ear, but little is known about the signaling pathways that guide hair cell differentiation during the regenerative process. The aim of the present study was to examine the factors that specify the orientation of hair cell stereocilia bundles during regeneration. Using organ cultures of the chick utricle, we show that hair cells are properly oriented after having regenerated entirely in vitro and that orientation is not affected by surgical removal of the striolar reversal zone. These results suggest that the orientation of regenerating stereocilia is not guided by the release of a diffusible morphogen from the striolar reversal zone but is specified locally within the regenerating sensory organ. In order to determine the nature of the reorientation cues, we examined the expression patterns of the core planar cell polarity molecule Vangl2 in the normal and regenerating utricle. We found that Vangl2 is asymmetrically expressed on cells within the sensory epithelium and that this expression pattern is maintained after ototoxic injury and throughout regeneration. Notably, treatment with a small molecule inhibitor of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase disrupted the orientation of regenerated hair cells. Both of these results are consistent with the hypothesis that noncanonical Wnt signaling guides hair cell orientation during regeneration.