Vincent SIMON




ITA

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4 publication(s) since Février 2017:


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The indicated IF have been collected by the Web of Sciences in


19/04/2021 | Cell Metab   IF 21.6
Hypothalamic bile acid-TGR5 signaling protects from obesity.
Castellanos-Jankiewicz A, Guzman-Quevedo O, Fenelon VS, Zizzari P, Quarta C, Bellocchio L, Tailleux A, Charton J, Fernandois D, Henricsson M, Piveteau C, Simon V, Allard C, Quemener S, Guinot V, Hennuyer N, Perino A, Duveau A, Maitre M, Leste-Lasserre T, Clark S, Dupuy N, Cannich A, Gonzales D, Deprez B, Mithieux G, Dombrowicz D, Backhed F, Prevot V, Marsicano G, Staels B, Schoonjans K, Cota D

Abstract:
Bile acids (BAs) improve metabolism and exert anti-obesity effects through the activation of the Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) in peripheral tissues. TGR5 is also found in the brain hypothalamus, but whether hypothalamic BA signaling is implicated in body weight control and obesity pathophysiology remains unknown. Here we show that hypothalamic BA content is reduced in diet-induced obese mice. Central administration of BAs or a specific TGR5 agonist in these animals decreases body weight and fat mass by activating the sympathetic nervous system, thereby promoting negative energy balance. Conversely, genetic downregulation of hypothalamic TGR5 expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus favors the development of obesity and worsens established obesity by blunting sympathetic activity. Lastly, hypothalamic TGR5 signaling is required for the anti-obesity action of dietary BA supplementation. Together, these findings identify hypothalamic TGR5 signaling as a key mediator of a top-down neural mechanism that counteracts diet-induced obesity.




Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is a key target of the melanocortin system, which orchestrates behavioral and metabolic responses depending on energy availability. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and the endocannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) pathways are two key signaling systems involved in the regulation of energy balance whose activity closely depends upon energy availability. Here we tested the hypothesis that modulation of mTORC1 and CB1R signaling regulates excitatory glutamatergic inputs onto the PVN. METHODS: Patch-clamp recordings in C57BL/6J mice, in mice lacking the mTORC1 component Rptor or CB1R in pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) neurons, combined with pharmacology targeting mTORC1, the melanocortin receptor type 4 (MC4R), or the endocannabinoid system under chow or a hypercaloric diet. RESULTS: Acute pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 in C57BL/6J mice decreased glutamatergic inputs onto the PVN via a mechanism requiring modulation of MC4R, endocannabinoid 2-AG mobilization by PVN parvocellular neurons, and retrograde activation of presynaptic CB1R. Further electrophysiology studies using mice lacking mTORC1 activity or CB1R in POMC neurons indicated that the observed effects involved mTORC1 and CB1R-dependent regulation of glutamate release from POMC neurons. Finally, energy surfeit caused by hypercaloric high-fat diet feeding, rapidly and time-dependently altered the glutamatergic inputs onto parvocellular neurons and the ability of mTORC1 and CB1R signaling to modulate such excitatory activity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings pinpoint the relationship between mTORC1 and endocannabinoid-CB1R signaling in the regulation of the POMC-mediated glutamatergic inputs onto PVN parvocellular neurons and its rapid alteration in conditions favoring the development of obesity.




13/04/2018 | Mol Metab   IF 6.3
mTORC1-dependent increase in oxidative metabolism in POMC neurons regulates food intake and action of leptin.
Haissaguerre M, Ferriere A, Simon V, Saucisse N, Dupuy N, Andre C, Clark S, Guzman-Quevedo O, Tabarin A, Cota D

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Nutrient availability modulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the hypothalamus. In turn, ROS regulate hypothalamic neuronal activity and feeding behavior. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is an important cellular integrator of the action of nutrients and hormones. Here we tested the hypothesis that modulation of mTORC1 activity, particularly in Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, mediates the cellular and behavioral effects of ROS. METHODS: C57BL/6J mice or controls and their knockout (KO) littermates deficient either for the mTORC1 downstream target 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) or for the mTORC1 component Rptor specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-rptor-KO) were treated with an intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or the ROS scavenger honokiol, alone or, respectively, in combination with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin or the mTORC1 activator leptin. Oxidant-related signal in POMC neurons was assessed using dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence. RESULTS: Icv administration of H2O2 decreased food intake, while co-administration of rapamycin, whole-body deletion of S6K1, or deletion of rptor in POMC neurons impeded the anorectic action of H2O2. H2O2 also increased oxidant levels in POMC neurons, an effect that hinged on functional mTORC1 in these neurons. Finally, scavenging ROS prevented the hypophagic action of leptin, which in turn required mTORC1 to increase oxidant levels in POMC neurons and to inhibit food intake. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that ROS and leptin require mTORC1 pathway activity in POMC neurons to increase oxidant levels in POMC neurons and consequently decrease food intake.




Abstract:
The endocannabinoid system (ECS), including cannabinoid type 1 and type 2 receptors (CB1R and CB2R), endogenous ligands called endocannabinoids and their related enzymatic machinery, is known to have a role in the regulation of energy balance. Past information generated on the ECS, mainly focused on the involvement of this system in the central nervous system regulation of food intake, while at the same time clinical studies pointed out the therapeutic efficacy of brain-penetrant CB1R antagonists like rimonabant for obesity and metabolic disorders. Rimonabant was removed from the market in 2009 and its obituary written due to its psychiatric side effects. However, in the meanwhile a number of investigations had started to highlight the roles of the peripheral ECS in the regulation of metabolism, bringing up new hope that the ECS might still represent target for treatment. Accordingly, peripherally-restricted CB1R antagonists or inverse agonists have shown to effectively reduce body weight, adiposity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in obese animal models. Very recent investigations have further expanded the possible toolbox for the modulation of the ECS, by demonstrating the existence of endogenous allosteric inhibitors of CB1R, the characterization of the structure of the human CB1R, and the likely involvement of CB2R in metabolic disorders. Here we give an overview of these findings, discussing what the future may hold in the context of strategies targeting the ECS in metabolic disease.