Daniela COTA




Principal Investigator

Phone : 33(0)5 57 57 37 05
Send an email



Cursus:
Médecine, Univ. Bologne, Italie (1999)
Postdoc Institut Max-Planck, Munich (2001–2003)
Postdoc Univ. Cincinnati, USA (2004-2007)
CR1 à l'Inserm (2008-2018)
DR2 à l'Inserm (2018)




Degrees:
Oct 1999: Degree in Medicine and Surgery (M.D., Magna cum Laude), University of Bologna, Italy
May 2000: Medical license

Career:

Since 2018: DR2 INSERM

Since 2008: Team Leader, Team: “Régulation de l'équilibre énergétique et obésité” (physiopathology of energy balance and obesity), NeuroCentre Magendie, Bordeaux, France

2008-2018: CR1 INSERM

2004– 2007: Postdoctoral Fellow with Profs. R. J. Seeley and S. C. Woods, Obesity Research Center, University of Cincinnati, USA

2001–2003: Postdoctoral Fellow with Profs. G. K. Stalla and U. Pagotto, Clinical Neuroendocrinology Group, Max-Planck institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany

2001–2003: Medical School of Specialization in Endocrinology and Metabolic Disorders, Director Prof. Renato Pasquali, University of Bologna, Italy

 



81 publication(s) since Juin 2000:


Sort by

* equal contribution
The indicated IF have been collected by the Web of Sciences in


19/04/2021 | Cell Metab   IF 21.6
Hypothalamic bile acid-TGR5 signaling protects from obesity.
Castellanos-Jankiewicz A, Guzman-Quevedo O, Fenelon VS, Zizzari P, Quarta C, Bellocchio L, Tailleux A, Charton J, Fernandois D, Henricsson M, Piveteau C, Simon V, Allard C, Quemener S, Guinot V, Hennuyer N, Perino A, Duveau A, Maitre M, Leste-Lasserre T, Clark S, Dupuy N, Cannich A, Gonzales D, Deprez B, Mithieux G, Dombrowicz D, Backhed F, Prevot V, Marsicano G, Staels B, Schoonjans K, Cota D

Abstract:
Bile acids (BAs) improve metabolism and exert anti-obesity effects through the activation of the Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) in peripheral tissues. TGR5 is also found in the brain hypothalamus, but whether hypothalamic BA signaling is implicated in body weight control and obesity pathophysiology remains unknown. Here we show that hypothalamic BA content is reduced in diet-induced obese mice. Central administration of BAs or a specific TGR5 agonist in these animals decreases body weight and fat mass by activating the sympathetic nervous system, thereby promoting negative energy balance. Conversely, genetic downregulation of hypothalamic TGR5 expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus favors the development of obesity and worsens established obesity by blunting sympathetic activity. Lastly, hypothalamic TGR5 signaling is required for the anti-obesity action of dietary BA supplementation. Together, these findings identify hypothalamic TGR5 signaling as a key mediator of a top-down neural mechanism that counteracts diet-induced obesity.




19/03/2021 | Nat Commun   IF 12.1
Adult-born neurons immature during learning are necessary for remote memory reconsolidation in rats.
Lods M, Pacary E, Mazier W, Farrugia F, Mortessagne P, Masachs N, Charrier V, Massa F, Cota D, Ferreira G, Abrous DN, Tronel S

Abstract:
Memory reconsolidation, the process by which memories are again stabilized after being reactivated, has strengthened the idea that memory stabilization is a highly plastic process. To date, the molecular and cellular bases of reconsolidation have been extensively investigated particularly within the hippocampus. However, the role of adult neurogenesis in memory reconsolidation is unclear. Here, we combined functional imaging, retroviral and chemogenetic approaches in rats to tag and manipulate different populations of rat adult-born neurons. We find that both mature and immature adult-born neurons are activated by remote memory retrieval. However, only specific silencing of the adult-born neurons immature during learning impairs remote memory retrieval-induced reconsolidation. Hence, our findings show that adult-born neurons immature during learning are required for the maintenance and update of remote memory reconsolidation.




15/03/2021 | Transl Psychiatry   IF 5.3
Inhibition of mTOR signaling by genetic removal of p70 S6 kinase 1 increases anxiety-like behavior in mice.
Koehl M, Ladeveze E, Catania C, Cota D, Abrous DN

Abstract:
The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a ubiquitously expressed kinase that acts through two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, to regulate protein homeostasis, as well as long lasting forms of synaptic and behavioral plasticity. Alteration of the mTOR pathway is classically involved in neurodegenerative disorders, and it has been linked to dysregulation of cognitive functions and affective states. However, information concerning the specific involvement of the p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), a downstream target of the mTORC1 pathway, in learning and memory processes and in the regulation of affective states remains scant. To fill this gap, we exposed adult male mice lacking S6K1 to a battery of behavioral tests aimed at measuring their learning and memory capabilities by evaluating reference memory and flexibility with the Morris water maze, and associative memory using the contextual fear conditioning task. We also studied their anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors by, respectively, performing elevated plus maze, open field, light-dark emergence tests, and sucrose preference and forced swim tests. We found that deleting S6K1 leads to a robust anxious phenotype concomitant with associative learning deficits; these symptoms are associated with a reduction of adult neurogenesis and neuronal atrophy in the hippocampus. Collectively, these results provide grounds for the understanding of anxiety reports after treatments with mTOR inhibitors and will be critical for developing novel compounds targeting anxiety.




25/02/2021 | nat metab
POMC neuronal heterogeneity in energy balance and beyond: an integrated view.
Quarta C, Claret M, Zeltser LM, Williams KW, Yeo GSH, Tschop MH, Diano S, Bruning JC, Cota D

Abstract:
Hypothalamic AgRP and POMC neurons are conventionally viewed as the yin and yang of the body's energy status, since they act in an opposite manner to modulate appetite and systemic energy metabolism. However, although AgRP neurons' functions are comparatively well understood, a unifying theory of how POMC neuronal cells operate has remained elusive, probably due to their high level of heterogeneity, which suggests that their physiological roles might be more complex than initially thought. In this Perspective, we propose a conceptual framework that integrates POMC neuronal heterogeneity with appetite regulation, whole-body metabolic physiology and the development of obesity. We highlight emerging evidence indicating that POMC neurons respond to distinct combinations of interoceptive signals and food-related cues to fine-tune divergent metabolic pathways and behaviours necessary for survival. The new framework we propose reflects the high degree of developmental plasticity of this neuronal population and may enable progress towards understanding of both the aetiology and treatment of metabolic disorders.




03/11/2020 | Diabetes   IF 7.7
CB1 and GLP-1 Receptors Cross-Talk Provides New Therapies for Obesity.
Zizzari P, He R, Falk S, Bellocchio L, Allard C, Clark S, Lest, Quarta C

Abstract:
GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists effectively improve glycemia and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity, but have limited weight-lowering efficacy and minimal insulin sensitizing action. In preclinical models, peripherally-restricted cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) inhibitors, which are devoid of the neuropsychiatric side-effects observed with brain-penetrant CB1R blockers, ameliorate obesity and its multiple metabolic complications. Using mouse models with genetic loss of CB1R or GLP-1R, we demonstrate that these two metabolic receptors modulate food intake and body weight via reciprocal functional interactions. In diet-induced obese mice, the co-administration of a peripheral CB1R inhibitor with long-acting GLP-1R agonists achieves greater reduction in body weight and fat mass than monotherapies, by promoting negative energy balance. This co-treatment also results in larger improvements in systemic and hepatic insulin action, systemic dyslipidemia, and reduction of hepatic steatosis. Thus, peripheral CB1R blockade may allow safely potentiating the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects of currently available GLP-1R agonists.




30/09/2020 | Curr Biol   IF 9.6
A Novel Cortical Mechanism for Top-Down Control of Water Intake.
Zhao Z, Soria-Gomez E, Varilh M, Covelo A, Julio-Kalajzic F, Cannich A, Castiglione A, Vanhoutte L, Duveau A, Zizzari P, Beyeler A, Cota D, Bellocchio L, Busquets-Garcia A, Marsicano G

Abstract:
Water intake is crucial for maintaining body fluid homeostasis and animals' survival [1-4]. In the brain, complex processes trigger thirst and drinking behavior [1-5]. The anterior wall of the third ventricle formed by the subfornical organ (SFO), the median preoptic nucleus, and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT) constitute the primary structures sensing thirst signals and modulating water intake [6-10]. These subcortical regions are connected with the neocortex [11]. In particular, insular and anterior cingulate cortices (IC and ACC, respectively) have been shown to receive indirect innervations from the SFO and OVLT in rats [11] and to be involved in the control of water intake [12-15]. Type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) modulate consummatory behaviors, such as feeding [16-26]. However, the role of CB1 receptors in the control of water intake is still a matter of debate [27-31]. Here, we show that endogenous activation of CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons of the ACC promotes water intake. Notably, presynaptic CB1 receptors of ACC glutamatergic neurons are abundantly located in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a key area in the regulation of water intake. The selective expression of CB1 receptors in the ACC-to-BLA-projecting neurons is sufficient to stimulate drinking behavior. Moreover, chemogenetic stimulation of these projecting neurons suppresses drinking behavior, further supporting the role of this neuronal population in the control of water intake. Altogether, these data reveal a novel cortico-amygdalar mechanism involved in the regulation of drinking behavior.




09/06/2020 | Neuroendocrinology   IF 4.3
Calcitonin gene-related peptide-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 in arcuate neurons is a link in the metabolic benefits of portal glucose.
Soty M, Vily-Petit J, Castellanos-Jankiewicz A, Guzman-Quevedo O, Raffin M, Clark S, Silva M, Gautier-Stein A, Cota D, Mithieux G

Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: Intestinal gluconeogenesis exerts metabolic benefits in energy homeostasis via the neural sensing of portal glucose. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to determine central mechanisms involved in the effects of intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) on the control of energy homeostasis. METHODS: We investigated the effects of glucose infusion into the portal vein, at a rate that mimics IGN, in conscious wild-type, leptin-deficient ob/ob and CGRP-/- mice. RESULTS: We report that portal glucose infusion decreases food intake and plasma glucose and induces in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) the phosphorylation of STAT3, the classic intracellular messenger of leptin signaling. This notably takes place in POMC-expressing neurons. STAT3-phosphorylation does not require leptin, since portal glucose effects are observed in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice. We hypothesized that the portal glucose effects could require calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuromediator previously suggested to suppress hunger. In line with this hypothesis, neither the metabolic benefits nor the phosphorylation of STAT3 in the ARC take place upon portal glucose infusion in CGRP-deficient mice. Moreover, intracerebroventricular injection of CGRP activates hypothalamic phosphorylation of STAT3 in mice, and CGRP does the same in hypothalamic cells. Finally, no metabolic benefit of dietary fibers (known to depend on the induction of IGN), takes place in CGRP deficient mice. CONCLUSIONS: CGRP-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 in the ARC is part of the neural chain determining the hunger-modulating and glucose-lowering effects of IGN/portal glucose. CONCLUSIONS: CGRP-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 in the ARC is part of the neural chain determining the hunger-modulating and glucose-lowering effects of IGN/portal glucose.




22/05/2020 | Nutrients   IF 4.5
Effects of a High-Protein Diet on Cardiometabolic Health, Vascular Function, and Endocannabinoids-A PREVIEW Study.
Tischmann L, Drummen M, Joris PJ, Gatta-Cherifi B, Raben A, Fogelholm M, Matias I, Cota D, Mensink RP, Westerterp-Plantenga MS, Adam TC

Abstract:
An unfavorable lipid profile and being overweight are known mediators in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The effect of diet, particularly high in protein, remains under discussion. Therefore, this study examines the effects of a high-protein (HP) diet on cardiometabolic health and vascular function (i.e., endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and retinal microvascular structure), and the possible association with plasma endocannabinoids and endocannabinoid-related compounds in overweight participants. Thirty-eight participants (64.5 +/- 5.9 (mean +/- SD) years; body mass index (BMI) 28.9 +/- 4.0 kg/m(2)) were measured for 48 h in a respiration chamber after body-weight maintenance for approximately 34 months following weight reduction. Diets with either a HP (n = 20) or moderate protein (MP; n = 18) content (25%/45%/30% vs. 15%/55%/30% protein/carbohydrate/fat) were provided in energy balance. Validated markers for cardiometabolic health (i.e., office blood pressure (BP) and serum lipoprotein concentrations) and vascular function (i.e., brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation, pulse wave analysis and velocity, and retinal microvascular calibers) were measured before and after those 48 h. Additionally, 24 h ambulatory BP, plasma anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), and pregnenolone (PREG) were analyzed throughout the day. Office and ambulatory BP, serum lipoprotein concentrations, and vascular function markers were not different between the groups. Only heart rate (HR) was higher in the HP group. HR was positively associated with OEA, while OEA and PEA were also positively associated with total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. Vascular function markers were not associated with endocannabinoids (or endocannabinoid-related substances). In conclusion, the HP diet did not affect cardiometabolic health and vascular function in overweight participants after completing a weight-loss intervention. Furthermore, our data indicate a possible association between OEA and PEA with TC and LDL cholesterol.




25/04/2020 | J Clin Endocrinol Metab   IF 5.4
Role of endocannabinoids in energy balance regulation in participants in the post-obese state - a PREVIEW study.
Drummen M, Tischmann L, Gatta-Cherifi B, Cota D, Matias I, Raben A, Adam T, Westerterp-Plantenga M

Abstract:
CONTEXT: Endocannabinoids are suggested to play a role in energy balance regulation. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate associations of endocannabinoid concentrations during the day with energy balance and adiposity and interactions with 2 diets differing in protein content in participants in the post-obese phase with pre-diabetes. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants (n=38) were individually fed in energy balance with a medium protein (MP: 15:55:30% of energy from Protein:Carbohydrate:Fat) or high protein diet (HP: 25:45:30% energy from P:C:F) for 48-hours in a respiration chamber. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Associations between energy balance, energy expenditure, RQ and endocannabinoid concentrations during the day were assessed. RESULTS: Plasma-concentrations of anandamide (AEA), oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoyethanolamide (PEA), and pregnenolone (PREG) significantly decreased during the day. This decrease was inversely related to BMI (AEA) or body-fat (%) (PEA; OEA). The lowest RQ value, before lunch, was inversely associated with concentrations of AEA and PEA before lunch. AUC of concentrations of AEA, 2-AG, PEA, and OEA were positively related to body-fat% (p<0.05). The HP and MP groups showed no differences in concentrations of AEA, OEA, PEA, and PREG, but the AUC of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) was significantly higher in the HP vs. the MP group. CONCLUSIONS: In energy balance, only the endocannabinoid 2-AG changed in relation to protein level of the diet, while the endocannabinoid AEA, and endocannabinoid-related compounds OEA and PEA reflected the gradual energy intake matching energy expenditure over the day.




21/04/2020 | Int J Obes (Lond)   IF 4.4
Anti-obesity therapy with peripheral CB1 blockers: from promise to safe(?) practice.
Quarta C, Cota D

Abstract:
Pharmacological blockers of the cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) have been considered for a long time as the holy grail of obesity pharmacotherapy. These agents were hastily released in the clinical setting, due to their clear-cut therapeutic efficacy. However, the first generation of these drugs, which were able to target both the brain and peripheral tissues, had serious neuropsychiatric effects, leading authorities to ban their clinical use. New peripherally restricted CB1 blockers, characterized by low brain penetrance, have been developed over the past 10 years. In preclinical studies, these molecules seem to overcome the neuropsychiatric negative effects previously observed with brain-penetrant CB1 inhibitors, while retaining or even outperforming their efficacy. The mechanisms of action of these peripherally restricted compounds are only beginning to emerge, and a balanced discussion of the risk/benefits ratio associated to their possible clinical use is urgently needed, in order to avoid repeating past mistakes. Here, we will critically discuss the advantages and the possible hidden threats associated with the use of peripheral CB1 blockers for the pharmacotherapy of obesity and its associated metabolic complications. We will address whether this novel pharmacological approach might 'compete' with current pharmacotherapies for obesity and diabetes, while also conceptualizing future CB1-based pharmacological trends that may significantly lower the risk/benefits ratio associated with the use of these drugs.