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Sophie TRONEL




Post Doc

Phone : 33(0)5 57 57 36 65
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Expertise: memory, consolidation, reconsolidation, neurogenesis, hippocampus, amygdala



I am working in the field of Learning and Memory since my PhD that I obtained in 2003 under the supervision of Susan SARA at University Paris VI. I then moved to New York (NY, USA) where I did a postdoctoral fellowship in the lab of Cristina Alberini at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. There I worked on the molecular basis of memory reconsolidation.

 In 2007, I came back to France to join the team of Nora Abrous in Bordeaux. I switched to the field of adult neurogenesis. I got my tenure position at the CNRS in 2011. Since then, My research is focused on the role of adult hippocampal neurons in the stabilisation of memory, in particular in the process of reconsolidation.



16 publication(s) since Mai 2002:


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The indicated IF have been collected by the Web of Sciences in


05/2006 | Cell Mol Life Sci   IF 7
Mechanisms of memory stabilization and de-stabilization.
Alberini CM , Milekic MH , Tronel S

Abstract:
Memories become stabilized through a time-dependent process that requires gene




09/2005 | PLoS Biol   IF 8.4
Linking new information to a reactivated memory requires consolidation and not
Tronel S , Milekic MH , Alberini CM

Abstract:
A new memory is initially labile and becomes stabilized through a process of




01/2005 | Learn Mem   IF 2.4
Reconsolidation after remembering an odor-reward association requires NMDA
Torras-Garcia M , Lelong J , Tronel S , Sara SJ

Abstract:
A rapidly learned odor discrimination task based on spontaneous foraging behavior




07/2004 | Learn Mem   IF 2.4
Noradrenergic action in prefrontal cortex in the late stage of memory
Tronel S , Feenstra MG , Sara SJ

Abstract:
These experiments investigated the role of the noradrenergic system in the late




Abstract:
The competitive antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonoeptanoic acid (APV) was injected




Abstract:
Although there is growing knowledge about intracellular mechanisms underlying