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6 publications


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Les IF indiqués ont été collectés par le Web of Sciences en Juin 2021

23/03/2021 | hepatology   IF 17.4
Proteomic profiling of hepatocellular adenomas paves the way to new diagnostic and prognostic approaches.
Dourthe C, Julien C, Di Tommaso S, Dupuy JW, Dugot-Senant N, Brochard A, Le Bail B, Blanc JF, Chiche L, Balabaud C, Bioulac-Sage P, Saltel F, Raymond AA
doi: 10.1002/hep.31826

Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Through an exploratory proteomic approach based on typical hepatocellular adenomas (HCA), we previously identified a new diagnostic biomarker for a distinctive subtype of HCA with high risk of bleeding, already validated on a multicenter cohort. We hypothesized that the whole protein expression deregulation profile could deliver much more informative data for tumors characterization. Therefore, we pursued our analysis with the characterization of HCAs proteomic profiles, evaluating their correspondence with the established genotype/phenotype classification and assessing whether they could provide added diagnosis and prognosis values. APPROACH & RESULTS: From a collection of 260 cases, we selected 52 typical cases of all different subgroups on which we built the first HCA proteomics database. Combining laser microdissection and mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis, we compared the relative protein abundances between tumoral (T) and non-tumoral (NT) liver tissues from each patient and we defined specific proteomic profile of each HCA sub-groups. Next, we built a matching algorithm comparing proteomic profile extracted from a patient with our reference HCA database. Proteomic profiles allowed HCA classification and made diagnosis possible, even for complexes cases with immunohistological or genomic analysis that did not lead to a formal conclusion. Despite a well-established pathomolecular classification, clinical practices have not substantially changed and HCA management link to the assessment of the malignant transformation risk remains delicate for many surgeons. That's why we also identified and validated a proteomic profile that directly evaluate malignant transformation risk regardless of HCA subtype. CONCLUSIONS: This pioneering work proposes a proteomic-based machine learning tool, operational on fixed biopsies, that can improve diagnosis and prognosis and therefore patient management for HCA.







08/09/2017 | Sci Rep   IF 4.3
Spinal miRNA-124 regulates synaptopodin and nociception in an animal model of bone cancer pain.
Elramah S, Lopez-Gonzalez MJ, Bastide M, Dixmerias F, Roca-Lapirot O, Wielanek-Bachelet AC, Vital A, Leste-Lasserre T, Brochard A, Landry M, Favereaux A
doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-10224-1

Abstract:
Strong breakthrough pain is one of the most disabling symptoms of cancer since it affects up to 90% of cancer patients and is often refractory to treatments. Alteration in gene expression is a known mechanism of cancer pain in which microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs, play a crucial role. Here, in a mouse model of cancer pain, we show that miR-124 is down-regulated in the spinal cord, the first relay of the pain signal to the brain. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that miR-124 is an endogenous and specific inhibitor of synaptopodin (Synpo), a key protein for synaptic transmission. In addition, we demonstrate that Synpo is a key component of the nociceptive pathways. Interestingly, miR-124 was down-regulated in the spinal cord in cancer pain conditions, leading to an up-regulation of Synpo. Furthermore, intrathecal injections of miR-124 mimics in cancerous mice normalized Synpo expression and completely alleviated cancer pain in the early phase of the cancer. Finally, miR-124 was also down-regulated in the cerebrospinal fluid of cancer patients who developed pain, suggesting that miR-124 could be an efficient analgesic drug to treat cancer pain patients.







25/07/2013 | Obesity (Silver Spring)
Leucine supplementation modulates fuel substrates utilization and glucose metabolism in previously obese mice.
Binder E, Bermudez-Silva FJ, Elie M, Leste-Lasserre T, Belluomo I, Clark S, Duchampt A, Mithieux G, Cota D
doi: 10.1002/oby.20578

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: High-protein diets favor weight loss and its maintenance. Whether these effects might be recapitulated by certain amino acids is unknown. Therefore, the impact of leucine supplementation on energy balance and associated metabolic changes in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice during and after weight loss was investigated. DESIGN AND METHODS: DIO C57BL/6J mice were fed a normocaloric diet to induce weight loss while receiving or not the amino acid leucine in drinking water. Body weight, food intake, body composition, energy expenditure, glucose tolerance, insulin, and leptin sensitivity were evaluated. Q-PCR analysis was performed on muscle, brown and white adipose tissues. RESULTS: DIO mice decreased body weight and fat mass in response to chow, but supplementation with leucine did not affect these parameters. During weight maintenance, mice supplemented with leucine had improved glucose tolerance, increased leptin sensitivity, and lower respiratory quotient. The latter was associated with changes in the expression of several genes modulating fatty acid metabolism and mitochondrial activity in the epididymal white and the brown adipose tissues, but not muscle. CONCLUSIONS: Leucine supplementation might represent an adjuvant beneficial nutritional therapy during weight loss and maintenance, because it improves lipid and glucose metabolism and restores leptin sensitivity in previously obese animals.







2013 | PLoS ONE   IF 3.7
Leucine supplementation protects from insulin resistance by regulating adiposity levels.
Binder E, Bermudez-Silva FJ, Andre C, Elie M, Romero-Zerbo SY, Leste-Lasserre T, Belluomo L, Duchampt A, Clark S, Aubert A, Mezzullo M, Fanelli F, Pagotto U, Laye S, Mithieux G, Cota D
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0074705

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Leucine supplementation might have therapeutic potential in preventing diet-induced obesity and improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanisms are at present unclear. Additionally, it is unclear whether leucine supplementation might be equally efficacious once obesity has developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed chow or a high-fat diet (HFD), supplemented or not with leucine for 17 weeks. Another group of HFD-fed mice (HFD-pairfat group) was food restricted in order to reach an adiposity level comparable to that of HFD-Leu mice. Finally, a third group of mice was exposed to HFD for 12 weeks before being chronically supplemented with leucine. Leucine supplementation in HFD-fed mice decreased body weight and fat mass by increasing energy expenditure, fatty acid oxidation and locomotor activity in vivo. The decreased adiposity in HFD-Leu mice was associated with increased expression of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP-3) in the brown adipose tissue, better insulin sensitivity, increased intestinal gluconeogenesis and preservation of islets of Langerhans histomorphology and function. HFD-pairfat mice had a comparable improvement in insulin sensitivity, without changes in islets physiology or intestinal gluconeogenesis. Remarkably, both HFD-Leu and HFD-pairfat mice had decreased hepatic lipid content, which likely helped improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, when leucine was supplemented to already obese animals, no changes in body weight, body composition or glucose metabolism were observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that leucine improves insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed mice by primarily decreasing adiposity, rather than directly acting on peripheral target organs. However, beneficial effects of leucine on intestinal gluconeogenesis and islets of Langerhans's physiology might help prevent type 2 diabetes development. Differently, metabolic benefit of leucine supplementation is lacking in already obese animals, a phenomenon possibly related to the extent of the obesity before starting the supplementation.







11/2012 | J Clin Invest   IF 12.8
PSD-95 expression controls L-DOPA dyskinesia through dopamine D1 receptor trafficking.
Porras G, Berthet A, Dehay B, Li Q, Ladepeche L, Normand E, Dovero S, Martinez A, Doudnikoff E, Martin-Negrier ML, Chuan Q, Bloch B, Choquet D, Boue-Grabot E, Groc L, Bezard E
doi: 10.1172/JCI59426

Abstract:
L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), a detrimental consequence of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease, is associated with an alteration in dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and glutamate receptor interactions. We hypothesized that the synaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 plays a pivotal role in this process, as it interacts with D1R, regulates its trafficking and function, and is overexpressed in LID. Here, we demonstrate in rat and macaque models that disrupting the interaction between D1R and PSD-95 in the striatum reduces LID development and severity. Single quantum dot imaging revealed that this benefit was achieved primarily by destabilizing D1R localization, via increased lateral diffusion followed by increased internalization and diminished surface expression. These findings indicate that altering D1R trafficking via synapse-associated scaffolding proteins may be useful in the treatment of dyskinesia in Parkinson's patients.







16/11/2011 | J Neurosci   IF 7.1
State-dependent, bidirectional modulation of neural network activity by endocannabinoids.
Piet R, Garenne A, Farrugia F, Le Masson G, Marsicano G, Chavis P, Manzoni OJ
doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4297-11.2011

Abstract:
The endocannabinoid (eCB) system and the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) play key roles in the modulation of brain functions. Although actions of eCBs and CB1Rs are well described at the synaptic level, little is known of their modulation of neural activity at the network level. Using microelectrode arrays, we have examined the role of CB1R activation in the modulation of the electrical activity of rat and mice cortical neural networks in vitro. We find that exogenous activation of CB1Rs expressed on glutamatergic neurons decreases the spontaneous activity of cortical neural networks. Moreover, we observe that the net effect of the CB1R antagonist AM251 inversely correlates with the initial level of activity in the network: blocking CB1Rs increases network activity when basal network activity is low, whereas it depresses spontaneous activity when its initial level is high. Our results reveal a complex role of CB1Rs in shaping spontaneous network activity, and suggest that the outcome of endogenous neuromodulation on network function might be state dependent.