News & Events






Seminars
23/01/2020 18h30
Conférence : « Déséquilibre alimentaire : quelles conséquences »

Lieu: Médiathèque Jacques Ellul de Pessac


Par Véronique Pallet (NutriNeuro) et Blandine Cherifi (Neurocentre Magendie)

Animé par Thierry Amédée (IINS)




Press review
14/01/2020
Carvalho et al in Elife - January 2020

Vangl2 acts at the interface between actin and N-cadherin to modulate mammalian neuronal outgrowth. Steve Dos-Santos Carvalho, Maite M Moreau, Yeri Esther Hien, Michael Garcia, Nathalie Aubailly, Deborah J Henderson, Vincent Studer, Nathalie Sans, Olivier Thoumine, Mireille Montcouquiol. eLife. 2020-01-07. 9.

Here, we show that an early deletion of vangl2 in neuronal progenitors of the forebrain leads to the spatially restricted deficit of only two commissural axon bundles. Mechanistically, we show that the absence of vangl2 leads to an increase in axonal outgrowth due to a reduced turnover of N-cadherin, and a better coupling between the adhesion molecule and the dynamic actin flow in the growth cone. Our results support a model in which Vangl2 acts as a regulator of membrane protein endocytosis and junctional remodeling during growth cone exploration, thereby modulating its outgrowth.

This study benefited from a close collaboration between the groups of Montcouquiol/Sans (Neurocentre Magendie), O. Thoumine (IINS), and V. Studer (IINS), funded by the Labex BRAIN (project PCP Compass).

https://www.bordeaux-neurocampus.fr/steve-dos-santos-carvalho-et-al-in-elife/
https://elifesciences.org/articles/51822





Job offers
19/12/2019
Postdoc Position in sensory information processing and perception

The Cortical Plasticity group at the Neurocentre Magendie (Bordeaux, France) is seeking to recruit a postdoctoral researcher to join their group in 2020.

We are interested in the function of neocortical circuits and their pathophysiological modification in neurodevelopmental disorders. In particular, we study sensory information processing and perception. To address this, we will use in vivo calcium imaging (two-photon/miniscope) and electrophysiological approaches (multi-electrode/whole-cell) in behaving mice.
We are looking for a highly motivated and proactive candidate with experience in in vivo electrophysiology and/or calcium imaging and analysis of this data. The successful candidate is expected to make significant contributions to the direction and conceptualization of the project. The appointee must have a PhD or equivalent qualification in either neuroscience, life sciences, medicine, or physics. The candidate should also have a good level of proficiency in English.

The team is based at the Neurocentre Magendie, an INSERM research institute, and a member of the Bordeaux Neurocampus — a center of excellence for neuroscience research in France. The day-to-day language is English, but support would be provided for learning French if the candidate so wishes.

The project is funded for three years.

Interested applicants should send a cv, brief statement of research experience and interests, and names of 2-3 references to Dr. Andreas Frick: andreas.frick@inserm.fr





Hottopic
18/12/2019 10h00
Noémie DEPRET from Montcouquiol-Sans's lab will give a presentation entitled "Planar cell polarity protein Vangl2 : a key player in the morphofonctional development of hippocampal network"

Hottopic
18/12/2019 10h45
Sourav GHOSH from Frick's lab will give a presentation entitled 'A common excitability phenotype of neocortical neurons in genetic forms of autism'

PhD/HDR defense
09/12/2019 14h00
Zhe ZHAO from Marsicano's lab will give a presentation entitled 'Role of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor in the control of water intake.' Role of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor in the control of water intake

Role of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor in the control of water intake
Thesis supervisor: Giovanni MARSICANO PhD

Water intake is crucial for maintaining body fluid homeostasis and animals’ survival. Complex brain processes trigger thirst, which arises upon losing blood volume (i.e. extracellular dehydration) or increasing blood osmolality (i.e. intracellular dehydration), to replenish water for fluid balance. The brain plays a key role in modulating these processes, but the central mechanisms regulating water intake are not fully understood. Type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) are widely and abundantly expressed in the central nervous system where they modulate a variety of functions, such as memory, anxiety and feeding behavior. However, the role of CB1 receptors in the control of water intake is still a matter of debate, since pharmacological activation or blockade of CB1 receptors produced contradictory results in drinking behavior experiments.
My thesis work focuses on the role of CB1 receptors in the control of water intake. By using genetic, pharmacological, anatomical, imaging, and behavioral approaches, I examined the involvement of CB1 receptors in the control of water intake induced by different physiological conditions of extracellular or intracellular dehydration. The results showed that CB1 receptor signaling is required to promote water intake. In particular, global deletion of CB1 receptors does not change plasma osmolality and body water composition, but it decreases water intake induced by water deprivation, systemic or intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of sodium chloride, or ICV injection of the peptide hormone angiotensin II. In the attempt to better detail the neuronal mechanisms of this function, I discovered that the presence of CB1 receptors in cortical glutamatergic neurons, particularly the ones located in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) glutamatergic neurons promote drinking behavior. CB1 receptors are abundantly expressed in axon terminal of ACC glutamatergic neurons projecting to the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and selective expression of CB1 receptors in this circuit is sufficient to guarantee proper drinking behavior in mice. Altogether, these data reveal that CB1 receptors are necessary to promote water intake, and that their presence in the ACC-BLA circuit is sufficient for the top-down control of drinking behavior.
Furthermore, I also provided evidence that CB1 controls water intake in different conditions at other levels, e.g. insular cortex, cholinergic cells, and mitochondria.
In summary, my thesis work analyzed the role of CB1 receptors in distinct cell populations/neuronal circuits for the control of water intake. These results will help further understanding the functions of the ECS and the brain regulation of thirst.

Date de la soutenance: 09/12/2019 - 14h00
Lieu: NeuroCentre Magendie conference room 



On 3 December 2019, Andreas Frick received the Marcel Dassault Award for his work on the processing of sensory information in the ASD.




Hottopic
27/11/2019 10h00
Valentine LE GALL from Herry's lab will give a presentation entitled "What is the role of the prefrontal cortex in the selection of innate fear responses ?".

Hottopic
27/11/2019 10h30
Ismail KOUBIYR from Oliet's lab will give a presentation entitled ' The reorganization of human brain networks in the early stage of multiple sclerosis.'