Neurocentre Magendie


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4 publications


* equal contribution
Les IF indiqués ont été collectés par le Web of Sciences en Juin 2016

25/07/2013 | Obesity (Silver Spring)   IF 3.4
Leucine supplementation modulates fuel substrates utilization and glucose metabolism in previously obese mice.
Binder E, Bermudez-Silva FJ, Elie M, Leste-Lasserre T, Belluomo I, Clark S, Duchampt A, Mithieux G, Cota D

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: High-protein diets favor weight loss and its maintenance. Whether these effects might be recapitulated by certain amino acids is unknown. Therefore, the impact of leucine supplementation on energy balance and associated metabolic changes in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice during and after weight loss was investigated. DESIGN AND METHODS: DIO C57BL/6J mice were fed a normocaloric diet to induce weight loss while receiving or not the amino acid leucine in drinking water. Body weight, food intake, body composition, energy expenditure, glucose tolerance, insulin, and leptin sensitivity were evaluated. Q-PCR analysis was performed on muscle, brown and white adipose tissues. RESULTS: DIO mice decreased body weight and fat mass in response to chow, but supplementation with leucine did not affect these parameters. During weight maintenance, mice supplemented with leucine had improved glucose tolerance, increased leptin sensitivity, and lower respiratory quotient. The latter was associated with changes in the expression of several genes modulating fatty acid metabolism and mitochondrial activity in the epididymal white and the brown adipose tissues, but not muscle. CONCLUSIONS: Leucine supplementation might represent an adjuvant beneficial nutritional therapy during weight loss and maintenance, because it improves lipid and glucose metabolism and restores leptin sensitivity in previously obese animals.







2013 | PLoS ONE   IF 3.1
Leucine supplementation protects from insulin resistance by regulating adiposity levels.
Binder E, Bermudez-Silva FJ, Andre C, Elie M, Romero-Zerbo SY, Leste-Lasserre T, Belluomo L, Duchampt A, Clark S, Aubert A, Mezzullo M, Fanelli F, Pagotto U, Laye S, Mithieux G, Cota D

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Leucine supplementation might have therapeutic potential in preventing diet-induced obesity and improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying mechanisms are at present unclear. Additionally, it is unclear whether leucine supplementation might be equally efficacious once obesity has developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed chow or a high-fat diet (HFD), supplemented or not with leucine for 17 weeks. Another group of HFD-fed mice (HFD-pairfat group) was food restricted in order to reach an adiposity level comparable to that of HFD-Leu mice. Finally, a third group of mice was exposed to HFD for 12 weeks before being chronically supplemented with leucine. Leucine supplementation in HFD-fed mice decreased body weight and fat mass by increasing energy expenditure, fatty acid oxidation and locomotor activity in vivo. The decreased adiposity in HFD-Leu mice was associated with increased expression of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP-3) in the brown adipose tissue, better insulin sensitivity, increased intestinal gluconeogenesis and preservation of islets of Langerhans histomorphology and function. HFD-pairfat mice had a comparable improvement in insulin sensitivity, without changes in islets physiology or intestinal gluconeogenesis. Remarkably, both HFD-Leu and HFD-pairfat mice had decreased hepatic lipid content, which likely helped improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, when leucine was supplemented to already obese animals, no changes in body weight, body composition or glucose metabolism were observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that leucine improves insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed mice by primarily decreasing adiposity, rather than directly acting on peripheral target organs. However, beneficial effects of leucine on intestinal gluconeogenesis and islets of Langerhans's physiology might help prevent type 2 diabetes development. Differently, metabolic benefit of leucine supplementation is lacking in already obese animals, a phenomenon possibly related to the extent of the obesity before starting the supplementation.







11/2012 | J Clin Invest   IF 12.6
PSD-95 expression controls L-DOPA dyskinesia through dopamine D1 receptor trafficking.
Porras G, Berthet A, Dehay B, Li Q, Ladepeche L, Normand E, Dovero S, Martinez A, Doudnikoff E, Martin-Negrier ML, Chuan Q, Bloch B, Choquet D, Boue-Grabot E, Groc L, Bezard E

Abstract:
L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), a detrimental consequence of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease, is associated with an alteration in dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and glutamate receptor interactions. We hypothesized that the synaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 plays a pivotal role in this process, as it interacts with D1R, regulates its trafficking and function, and is overexpressed in LID. Here, we demonstrate in rat and macaque models that disrupting the interaction between D1R and PSD-95 in the striatum reduces LID development and severity. Single quantum dot imaging revealed that this benefit was achieved primarily by destabilizing D1R localization, via increased lateral diffusion followed by increased internalization and diminished surface expression. These findings indicate that altering D1R trafficking via synapse-associated scaffolding proteins may be useful in the treatment of dyskinesia in Parkinson's patients.







16/11/2011 | J Neurosci   IF 5.9
State-dependent, bidirectional modulation of neural network activity by endocannabinoids.
Piet R, Garenne A, Farrugia F, Le Masson G, Marsicano G, Chavis P, Manzoni OJ

Abstract:
The endocannabinoid (eCB) system and the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) play key roles in the modulation of brain functions. Although actions of eCBs and CB1Rs are well described at the synaptic level, little is known of their modulation of neural activity at the network level. Using microelectrode arrays, we have examined the role of CB1R activation in the modulation of the electrical activity of rat and mice cortical neural networks in vitro. We find that exogenous activation of CB1Rs expressed on glutamatergic neurons decreases the spontaneous activity of cortical neural networks. Moreover, we observe that the net effect of the CB1R antagonist AM251 inversely correlates with the initial level of activity in the network: blocking CB1Rs increases network activity when basal network activity is low, whereas it depresses spontaneous activity when its initial level is high. Our results reveal a complex role of CB1Rs in shaping spontaneous network activity, and suggest that the outcome of endogenous neuromodulation on network function might be state dependent.