Neurocentre Magendie

Maïté MOREAU




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Cursus:
PhD Université Bordeaux II (2006)
Post-Doc Neurocentre Magendie (2007-2013)
Ingénieur Neurocentre Magendie - depuis 2013

Expertise: Social behavior, Golgi staining, Polarity proteins



dans " The Journal of Infectious Diseases " ... 2005


 

Coloration de Golgi (cortex de souris)




7 publication(s) depuis Août 2005:


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* equal contribution
Les IF indiqués ont été collectés par le Web of Sciences en


23/10/2014 | Cell Rep   IF 7.9
Scribble1/AP2 complex coordinates NMDA receptor endocytic recycling.
Piguel NH, Fievre S, Blanc JM, Carta M, Moreau MM, Moutin E, Pinheiro VL, Medina C, Ezan J, Lasvaux L, Loll F, Durand CM, Chang K, Petralia RS, Wenthold RJ, Stephenson FA, Vuillard L, Darbon H, Perroy J, Mulle C, Montcouquiol M, Racca C, Sans N

Abstract:
The appropriate trafficking of glutamate receptors to synapses is crucial for basic synaptic function and synaptic plasticity. It is now accepted that NMDA receptors (NMDARs) internalize and are recycled at the plasma membrane but also exchange between synaptic and extrasynaptic pools; these NMDAR properties are also key to governing synaptic plasticity. Scribble1 is a large PDZ protein required for synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Herein, we show that the level of Scribble1 is regulated in an activity-dependent manner and that Scribble1 controls the number of NMDARs at the plasma membrane. Notably, Scribble1 prevents GluN2A subunits from undergoing lysosomal trafficking and degradation by increasing their recycling to the plasma membrane following NMDAR activation. Finally, we show that a specific YxxR motif on Scribble1 controls these mechanisms through a direct interaction with AP2. Altogether, our findings define a molecular mechanism to control the levels of synaptic NMDARs via Scribble1 complex signaling.




21/07/2010 | J Neurosci   IF 5.9
The planar polarity protein Scribble1 is essential for neuronal plasticity and brain function.
Moreau MM, Piguel N, Papouin T, Koehl M, Durand CM, Rubio ME, Loll F, Richard EM, Mazzocco C, Racca C, Oliet SH, Abrous DN, Montcouquiol M, Sans N

Abstract:
Scribble (Scrib) is a key regulator of apicobasal polarity, presynaptic architecture, and short-term synaptic plasticity in Drosophila. In mammals, its homolog Scrib1 has been implicated in cancer, neural tube closure, and planar cell polarity (PCP), but its specific role in the developing and adult nervous system is unclear. Here, we used the circletail mutant, a mouse model for PCP defects, to show that Scrib1 is located in spines where it influences actin cytoskeleton and spine morphing. In the hippocampus of these mutants, we observed an increased synapse pruning associated with an increased number of enlarged spines and postsynaptic density, and a decreased number of perforated synapses. This phenotype was associated with a mislocalization of the signaling pathway downstream of Scrib1, leading to an overall activation of Rac1 and defects in actin dynamic reorganization. Finally, Scrib1-deficient mice exhibit enhanced learning and memory abilities and impaired social behavior, two features relevant to autistic spectrum disorders. Our data identify Scrib1 as a crucial regulator of brain development and spine morphology, and suggest that Scrib1(crc/+) mice might be a model for studying synaptic dysfunction and human psychiatric disorders.




05/2009 | Mol Psychiatry   IF 15
Lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior is mediated by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation in mice
O'Connor JC, Lawson MA, Andre C, Moreau M, Lestage J, Castanon N, Kelley KW, Dantzer R

Abstract:
Although elevated activity of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been proposed to mediate comorbid depression in inflammatory disorders, its causative role has never been tested. We report that peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates IDO and culminates in a distinct depressive-like behavioral syndrome, measured by increased duration of immobility in both the forced-swim and tail suspension tests. Blockade of IDO activation either indirectly with the anti-inflammatory tetracycline derivative minocycline, that attenuates LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines, or directly with the IDO antagonist 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), prevents development of depressive-like behavior. Both minocycline and 1-MT normalize the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the plasma and brain of LPS-treated mice without changing the LPS-induced increase in turnover of brain serotonin. Administration of L-kynurenine, a metabolite of tryptophan that is generated by IDO, to naive mice dose dependently induces depressive-like behavior. These results implicate IDO as a critical molecular mediator of inflammation-induced depressive-like behavior, probably through the catabolism of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway.




10/2008 | Brain Behav Immun   IF 5.9
Inoculation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin to mice induces an acute episode of sickness behavior followed by chronic depressive-like behavior.
Moreau M, Andre C, O'Connor JC, Dumich SA, Woods JA, Kelley KW, Dantzer R, Lestage J, Castanon N

Abstract:
Although cytokine-induced sickness behavior is now well-established, the mechanisms by which chronic inflammation and depression are linked still remain elusive. Therefore this study aimed to develop a suitable model to identify the neurobiological basis of depressive-like behavior induced by chronic inflammation, independently of sickness behavior. We chose to measure the behavioral consequences of chronic inoculation of mice with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), which has been shown to chronically activate both lung and brain indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme that mediates the occurrence of depressive-like behavior following acute innate immune system activation. BCG inoculation induced an acute episode of sickness (approximately 5 days) that was followed by development of delayed depressive-like behaviors lasting over several weeks. Transient body weight loss, reduction of motor activity and the febrile response to BCG were dissociated temporarily from a sustained increase in the duration of immobility in both forced swim and tail suspension tests, reduced voluntary wheel running and decreased preference for sucrose (a test of anhedonia). Moreover, we show that a distinct pattern of cytokine production and IDO activation parallels the transition from sickness to depression. Protracted depressive-like behavior, but not sickness behavior, was associated with sustained increase in plasma interferon-gamma and TNF-alpha concentrations and peripheral IDO activation. Together, these promising new data establish BCG inoculation of mice as a reliable rodent model of chronic inflammation-induced depressive-like behaviors that recapitulate many clinical observations and provide important clues about the neurobiological basis through which cytokines may have an impact on affective behaviors.




09/2008 | Neuropsychopharmacology   IF 7.8
Aging exacerbates depressive-like behavior in mice in response to activation of the peripheral innate immune system
Godbout J P, Moreau M, Lestage J, Chen J, Sparkman N L, J O' Connor, Castanon N, Kelley K W, Dantzer R, Johnson R W

Abstract:
Exposure to peripheral infections may be permissive to cognitive and behavioral complications in the elderly. We have reported that peripheral stimulation of the innate immune system with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes an exaggerated neuroinflammatory response and prolonged sickness behavior in aged BALB/c mice. Because LPS also causes depressive behavior, the purpose of this study was to determine whether aging is associated with an exacerbated depressive-like response. We confirmed that LPS (0.33 mg/kg intraperitoneal) induced a protracted sickness response in aged mice with reductions in locomotor and feeding activities 24 and 48 h postinjection, when young adults had fully recovered. When submitted to the forced swim test 24 h post-LPS, both young adult and aged mice exhibited an increased duration of immobility. However, when submitted to either the forced swim test or the tail suspension test 72 h post-LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in aged mice. This prolonged depressive-like behavior in aged LPS-treated mice was associated with a more pronounced induction of peripheral and brain indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and a markedly higher turnover rate of brain serotonin (as measured by the ratio of 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid over 5-hydroxy-tryptamine) compared to young adult mice at 24 post-LPS injection. These results provide the first evidence that age-associated reactivity of the brain cytokine system could play a pathophysiological role in the increased prevalence of depression observed in the elderly.




06/2007 | Psychoneuroendocrinology   IF 4.2
Lipopolysaccharide induces delayed FosB/DeltaFosB immunostaining within the mouse extended amygdala, hippocampus and hypothalamus, that parallel the expression of depressive-like behavior
Frenois F, Moreau M, O'Connor J, Lawson M, Micon C, Lestage J, Kelley K W, Dantzer R, Castanon N

Abstract:
Proinflammatory cytokines induce both sickness behavior and depression, but their respective neurobiological correlates are still poorly understood. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify in mice the neural substrates of sickness and depressive-like behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 830 microg/kg, intraperitoneal). LPS-induced depressive-like behavior was dissociated from LPS-induced sickness by testing mice either at 6 h (at which time sickness was expected to be maximal) or at 24 h post-LPS (at which time sickness was expected to be minimal and not to bias the measurement of depressive-like behavior). Concurrently, the expression of acute and chronic cellular reactivity markers (c-Fos and FosB/DeltaFosB, respectively) was mapped by immunohistochemistry at these two time points. In comparison to saline, LPS decreased motor activity in a new cage at 6 h but not at 24 h. In contrast, the duration of immobility in the tail suspension test was increased at both 6 and 24 h. This dissociation between decreased motor activity and depressive-like behavior was confirmed at 24 h post-LPS in the forced swim test. LPS also decreased sucrose consumption at 24 and 48 h, despite normal food and water consumption by that time. At 24 h post-LPS, LPS-induced depressive-like behavior was associated with a delayed cellular activity (as assessed by FosB/DeltaFosB immunostaining) in specific brain structures, particularly within the extended amygdala, hippocampus and hypothalamus, whereas c-Fos labeling was markedly decreased by that time in all the brain areas at 6 h post-LPS. These results provide the first evidence in favor of a functional dissociation between the brain structures that underlie cytokine-induced sickness behavior and cytokine-induced depressive-like behavior, and provide important cues about the neuroanatomical brain circuits through which cytokines could have an impact on affect.




01/08/2005 | J Infect Dis   IF 6.3
Bacille Calmette-Guerin inoculation induces chronic activation of peripheral and brain indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in mice
Moreau M, Lestage J, Verrier D, Mormede C, Kelley K W, Dantzer R, Castanon N

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Activation of the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme and the resulting decrease in plasma tryptophan (TRP) levels appears to be a crucial link in the relationship between cytokines and depression. We aimed to develop an experimental model of chronic IDO activation based on bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infection that elicits a robust increase in levels of interferon (IFN)- gamma, a key cytokine in the activation of IDO. METHODS: Mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with BCG (10(7) cfu/mouse). Lung and brain IDO activity was measured over time, together with plasma levels of TRP and IFN- gamma. RESULTS: BCG induced, over the course of several weeks, a chronic increase in serum IFN- gamma levels that was associated with a sustained enhancement of lung and brain IDO activity and with decreases in peripheral (serum and lungs) and brain concentrations of TRP, with different time courses between tissues. CONCLUSIONS: The model of BCG-induced IDO activation will be useful for the study of the consequences of peripheral immune activation in the brain and the role of TRP metabolism in cytokine-induced mood alteration.